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This profile was last updated on 12/2/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Mr. John R. Stokes Jr.

Wrong John R. Stokes Jr.?
 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

13 Total References
Web References
JJT Inc. - Making History Digital - About JJT - Who We Are
www.studioprotocol.com [cached]
Profile: John R. Stokes
JJT's prominence in the digital imaging industry began in the mid-80s during John R. Stokes' work with the National Geographic society, the Library of Medicine and the Library of Congress.It was during these projects that his research and development background, expansive knowledge of photography and early videodisc technologies broke new ground in digital imaging and ultimately proved invaluable to these institutions.
John R. Stokes was the chief scientist and primary architect of JJT's industry leading technology and processes, His high standards, spirit of innovation and thoughtful counsel continue to guide the organization growth and success.
Following is a profile of Mr. John R. Stokes.
John R.'s educational background in Physics set the stage for his innovation-focused approach to problem solving:
1953 BS, Math and Physics, East Texas State University1956 MA, Physics, The University of Texas1958-64 Physics and Technical Writing from the Texas Christian University1975 Graduate Courses in Educational Psychology and Communications, University of Texas
In 1957, John R. became the first person to measure the neutron spectrum from a portable nuclear reactor and was also instrumental in designing the experiment.John R. performed pre- and post-analysis for numerous nuclear shielding experiments between 1958 and 1964 and served as scientific advisor on radiation shielding experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Tower Shielding Facility from January through June 1958.From 1963 through 1965, Mr. Stokes supervised the technical activities of 35 engineers, physicists, and mathematicians during one of the last above ground nuclear-weapons tests in Nevada in 1962.Mr. Stokes has authored, or co-authored, 19 publications on nuclear shielding between 1958 and 1971.
The genesis of JJT, Inc. occurred when John R. founded Stokes Imaging Services in 1971, and served as its president until1994.Stokes became the largest duplicator of slides in the United States during its first 12 years, and became a leader in electronic imaging during its last ten years.John R. became a member of the Association for Multi-Image in 1978, served as president of the Association during 1981-82, and was awarded life membership in 1993.
John R. created the conceptual design, and directed the development of, animation cameras, film transports, and precision light sources to improve the accuracy and efficiency of slide duplication and systems for the conversion of photographic images to analog and digital formats.He was responsible for the conceptual design and implementation of the Digital Imaging System still being used for digitizing some upwards of a million prints and photographs for the Library of Congress.This long-term, durable relationship began with John R.'s breakthrough work in providing conversion of images to videodisks.John R. was using digital images in the 80's as an intermediate to the videodisks and, in many ways, pioneered this field.
During 1986 through 1998, John R. wrote several technical proposals that resulted in Stokes being awarded contracts for image conversion services from major clients.During the same period, Stokes was awarded a contract for capturing and transferring images for the National Geographic Society.
John R. Stokes ...
www.studioprotocol.com [cached]
John R. Stokes
JJT's prominence in the digital imaging industry began in the late-80s during John R. Stokes' work with the National Geographic society, the Library of Medicine and the Library of Congress.It was during these projects that his research and development background, expansive knowledge of photography and early videodisc technologies broke new ground in digital imaging and ultimately proved invaluable to these institutions.
John R. Stokes was the primary architect and founder of JJT, Inc.It is his high standards, spirit of innovation and thoughtful counsel that continue to guide the organization growth and success.
To read a detailed Professional Profile of Mr. Stokes please click here.
Arkansas History Commission Spotlight [OCLC Digital and Preservation Outreach Services]
digitalcooperative.oclc.org [cached]
The bid process resulted in the selection of a top quality vendor, John R. Stokes, Jr. of JJT, Inc., Austin, Texas, whose impressive client list includes the Library of Congress American Memory project, National Geographic, and the New York Public Library.
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SOD went live at a formal opening in June 2001 attended by key project participants, digital vendor John R. Stokes, Jr., Tom Clareson (then manager of Amigos Imaging and Preservation Service) and other guests.
JJT Inc. - Making History Digital - About JJT - Who We Are
www.jjt.com [cached]
Leadership Team | Advisory Board | Profile: John R. Stokes
JJT's prominence in the digital imaging industry began in the mid-80s during John R. Stokes' work with the National Geographic society, the Library of Medicine and the Library of Congress.It was during these projects that his research and development background, expansive knowledge of photography and early videodisc technologies broke new ground in digital imaging and ultimately proved invaluable to these institutions.
John R. Stokes was the chief scientist and primary architect of JJT's industry leading technology and processes.His high standards, spirit of innovation and thoughtful counsel continue to guide the organization growth and success.
Following is a profile of Mr. John R. Stokes.
John R.'s educational background in Physics set the stage for his innovation-focused approach to problem solving:
1953 BS, Math and Physics, East Texas State University1956 MA, Physics, The University of Texas1958-64 Physics and Technical Writing from the Texas Christian University1975 Graduate Courses in Educational Psychology and Communications, University of Texas
In 1957, John R. became the first person to measure the neutron spectrum from a portable nuclear reactor and was also instrumental in designing the experiment.John R. performed pre- and post-analysis for numerous nuclear shielding experiments between 1958 and 1964 and served as scientific advisor on radiation shielding experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Tower Shielding Facility from January through June 1958.From 1963 through 1965, Mr. Stokes supervised the technical activities of 35 engineers, physicists, and mathematicians during one of the last above ground nuclear-weapons tests in Nevada in 1962.Mr. Stokes has authored, or co-authored, 19 publications on nuclear shielding between 1958 and 1971.
The genesis of JJT, Inc. occurred when John R. founded Stokes Imaging Services in 1971, and served as its president until1994.Stokes became the largest duplicator of slides in the United States during its first 12 years, and became a leader in electronic imaging during its last ten years.John R. became a member of the Association for Multi-Image in 1978, served as president of the Association during 1981-82, and was awarded life membership in 1993.
John R. created the conceptual design, and directed the development of, animation cameras, film transports, and precision light sources to improve the accuracy and efficiency of slide duplication and systems for the conversion of photographic images to analog and digital formats.He was responsible for the conceptual design and implementation of the Digital Imaging System still being used for digitizing some upwards of a million prints and photographs for the Library of Congress.This long-term, durable relationship began with John R.'s breakthrough work in providing conversion of images to videodisks.John R. was using digital images in the 80's as an intermediate to the videodisks and, in many ways, pioneered this field.
During 1986 through 1998, John R. wrote several technical proposals that resulted in Stokes being awarded contracts for image conversion services from major clients.During the same period, Stokes was awarded a contract for capturing and transferring images for the National Geographic Society.
Creating a Storied History
www.digitaloutput.net [cached]
The company dates back to 1971, when John R. Stokes, current head of JJT's digital imaging group, and his wife lay the foundation for what would become JJT.
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Business continued at a relatively slow pace until 1989, when Stokes' company picked up three very significant customers: the Library of Medicine, which asked Stokes to convert its History of Medicine collection to videodisk; the National Geographic Society, which wanted
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"They wanted to digitize some 300,000 photographs from their collections using better technology," John R. says.
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So, John R. decided to go to the source: Udo and Reimar Lenz, the Munich designers of the Kontron Eyelike.
"The Kontron digital camera had a unique method of scanning that gave users the ability to take a small chip in low resolution and create high-resolution images that went up to 3,000 pixels in the long dimension," Stokes says."The Lenz brothers' Marc project, which was undertaken by several museums in Europe, demonstrated that you could digitize digital museum paintings directly and go to print to produce a quality equivalent of what you could get if you used a film intermediate.
"When we heard this was being done, and knowing what the Library of Congress expected us to do, I went to Germany and went to the designers directly to ask if they would design what we were looking for, which was something similar to the Marc [and would allow for 10,000 pixels in the long dimension]," Stokes adds.
Eventually, the brothers agreed to build three Marc II cameras for a total cost of $140,000 (not including the lens or bellows), Stokes says.
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According to Stokes, each scan done by the Marc II cameras takes into account individual focus, lighting and color.Once the image is captured, it is written to a file as a raw image.It also is scaled to 1K along the long dimension to produce an "evaluation" image, which also is written to file.
With the Marc IIs in hand, JJT then sent in its response to the request for proposal (RFP) to the Library of Congress, noting that they would need approximately six months to build the new cameras, software and tracking system to handle 300,000 images the Library wanted digitized.The Library accepted it.
"The government has two criteria for awarding contracts," John R. says.
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In the end, JJT created a production-based system that allows the company "to spread out the digitizing process like Henry Ford did in developing the Model T," John R. says.
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"This gives us more efficiency than you could ever get by doing one image at a time," John R. says.
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"We're not perfect, and we'll make mistakes, but we'll deliver as perfect a product as is possible in the end," John R. says."I'm open and honest with clients, and that's why we have good relationships," he says.
For example, while in the last stages of a project for the New York Public Library, John R. says one of the pixels on their camera died."We did not catch it in our inspection process, but the client did, so we had to go back and spot out that dead pixel in every image.It was something we would never have seen in print, but the people we deal with will take their images, enlarge them by two or more to inspect them, and their quality control people caught it.
"We wanted to create a satisfactory project for the client and the client was patient with us," John R. continues."If a client finds a problem with our work, we will correct it in every case."
Building on this reputation, and with newfound resources because of Dallas-based Piranha Inc.'s recent purchase of the company, JJT hopes to expand its business."We don't have a large client basis - only about half a dozen significant institutional customers.We also were a small company with somewhat limited resources to expand," says John R., noting that there are only eight people to the digitizing staff, including the three in Washington, D.C., who work on the Library of Congress project.
"I think our new resources will allow us to use our technology and expand on our capabilities, not just for the institutional business, but for the commercial market as well," John R. adds."The commercial market, in terms of the publication industry, is just at the threshold for using digital."
He notes that for the commercial market, digital cameras have got to compete with drum scanners.Nevertheless, JJT is committed to reaching that level."We want to take our technology to the next level to create high-quality imaging for the commercial market," John R. says, noting he will continue to "live and breathe digital imaging."It's not a reality yet," he says, "but it will be."
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JJT has focused on institutional clients because John R. Stokes, head of the company's imaging division, knew that they had large collections and were relatively easy clients to find.However, working for such customers, whose collections typically are older, means learning special handling procedures.
"For the New York Historical Society, Northwestern and the Library of Congress when we've gone onsite, their staff took our people through a training session," Stokes says."In the past 10 years, we've gone through this review process several times and have developed our own process."
This helps, Stokes says, when JJT winds up scanning images at its headquarters.
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According to Stokes, the company specializes in SAS software from the SAS Institute in North Carolina.But the software group also provides support for the company's imaging division.
"The software group does two things," Stokes explains."It provides software support for our imaging group, and it provides software support for outside companies."
For example, the company's software division helped develop the software necessary to automate the digitizing process for the Library of Congress project, Stokes says.Additionally, Stokes says, "JJT is constantly improving on this imaging software, which affects many clients in terms of the company's capabilities."He notes that the two divisions often work in tandem "to provide new functionality in servicing clients."Nevertheless, Stokes says that either business could be self-sufficient.
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