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2016-05-14T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong John Prins?

Prof. John Prins

Chief Executive Officer and Director

Mater Medical Research Institute

HQ Phone: +61 7 3163 2555

Email: j***@***.au

Mater Medical Research Institute

Level 3 Aubigny Place Raymond Terrace

South Brisbane, Queensland 4101

Australia

Company Description

Mater Medical Research Institute (MMRI) is a world class institute that is committed to academic medicine and aims to discover, develop, translate, and commercialise medical research that integrates with relevant areas of excellence within clinical practi ... more

Find other employees at this company (33)

Background Information

Employment History

Professor of Endocrinology
The University of Queensland

Senior Endocrinologist
Princess Alexandra Hospital

Chief Executive Officer Professor
Mater Children's Hospital

Manager, Active Research Group Investigating the Relationship
Brisbane

Affiliations

Numerous National and International Scientific, Clinical and Educational Committees
National Health and Medical Research Council

Board Member
Mater Foundation

Team Member
Translational Research Institute

Numerous Grant Review and Advisory Committees
Health Translation Advisory Committee

Numerous Grant Review and Advisory Committees
NHMRC , NGOs and Industry

Founder
Diamantina Institute

Education

PhD
adipose tissue biology
The University of Queensland

PhD
adipose tissue biology
University of Cambridge , UK

PhD
adipose tissue biology
University of Qld.

PhDs

Web References (187 Total References)


Mater Foundation - Who we are - Our People - Board

materfoundation.org.au [cached]

John Prins

...
John Prins
...
John is Director/CEO of the Mater Research Institute-UQ, Senior Endocrinologist at Princess Alexandra Hospital and Profession of Endocrinology at The University of Queensland. He is also a Director of the Metro South Hospital and Health Service which has a budget of $2b and provides health care to more than one million people.
He undertook clinical training in Endocrinology and his PhD in adipose tissue biology in Australia. He then undertook a four year post-doctoral appointment at The University of Cambridge, UK. In 1998 he returned to Brisbane where he established an active research program undertaking clinical trials in obesity and diabetes.
John has published more than 140 research publications with a total of 10,000+ citations. He has significant commercialisation experience and sits on numerous grant review and advisory committees for NHMRC, NGOs and industry.


Governance (mater.org.au)

www.mater.org.au [cached]

Professor John Prins is an active clinician-scientist, a key opinion leader in diabetes and endocrinology in Australia and sits on numerous national and international scientific, clinical and educational committees and boards.

Professor Prins undertook his clinical training in endocrinology in Brisbane and then completed a PhD in adipose tissue biology at The University of Queensland (UQ). His first postdoctoral research appointment was at the University of Cambridge, UK, based at Addenbrooke's Hospital.
In 2004 he was Founder/Director of the UQ Centre for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, which merged with the UQ Centre for Immunology and Cancer Research (CICR) in January 2007 to form the Diamantina Institute.
Professor Prins was appointed CEO/Director of Mater Research in 2009, and he remains actively involved in undergraduate and post-graduate teaching and training and has ongoing research interests in obesity and diabetes.


Mater Foundation - Who we are - Our People - Board

www.materfoundation.org.au [cached]

John Prins

...
John Prins
...
John is Director/CEO of the Mater Research Institute-UQ, Senior Endocrinologist at Princess Alexandra Hospital and Profession of Endocrinology at The University of Queensland. He is also a Director of the Metro South Hospital and Health Service which has a budget of $2b and provides health care to more than one million people.
He undertook clinical training in Endocrinology and his PhD in adipose tissue biology in Australia. He then undertook a four year post-doctoral appointment at The University of Cambridge, UK. In 1998 he returned to Brisbane where he established an active research program undertaking clinical trials in obesity and diabetes.
John has published more than 140 research publications with a total of 10,000+ citations. He has significant commercialisation experience and sits on numerous grant review and advisory committees for NHMRC, NGOs and industry.


Speakers ยป ANZOS 2015

www.anzos2015.org [cached]

John Prins

Professor John Prins Mater Medical Research Institute
Professor John Prins is an active clinician-scientist, a key opinion leader in diabetes and endocrinology in Australia and sits on numerous national and international scientific, clinical and educational committees and boards for the National Health and M Read More...


At face value it seems we ...

alumni.uq.edu.au [cached]

At face value it seems we have everything we need, suggests Professor John Prins, Director of Mater Research Institute and final commentator for the 2015 Global Leadership Series (GLS).

His GLS presentation on the obesity epidemic was a sell out, and offered some thought-provoking, evidence-based and sometimes controversial (despite its scientific roots) information.
"We have ready access to healthy, nutritious food; there are multiple gyms in most suburbs," said Professor Prins.
"At face value it seems we have everything we need to live a healthy and active life, yet we have never been larger and less active as a nation, and indeed as a global population, than we are now."
On what then has caused the obesity epidemic, Professor Prins said it was a million dollar question, being researched in universities and organisations the world over.
...
Professor Prins also suggested longer working hours were also contributing to expanding waistlines and decreasing activity levels.
On the positive side, however the trend of decreased structured physical education classes and sports programs in schools is now being reversed, with the education system placing greater value on sports, and particularly, participation.
"The great news is that in children and young Australians, obesity rates have actually plateaued and for optimistic researchers, actually appear to be going down," said Professor Prins.
"The same is being seen in the US, where obesity rates have actually fallen in the last ten years.
"The great indication is that we can actually turn this around."
Professor Prins said the key to this is early education.
"The time to educate around food and exercise is absolutely in youth," he said.
"There are great programs now in the US where kids are learning the right information in schools and are then going home and educating the older members of their family.
"These children are learning to regulate their eating and exercise which was the intended benefit, however the flow on effect has been increased knowledge in the families of these students."
Professor Prins also noted that it was key to source information on diet and exercise from reputable sources, particularly given the wealth and variety of information accessible on the internet
"There are thousands of different websites on health and each is going to present information in different ways," he said.
"For example The Cancer Council and The Heart Foundation have competing ideas on healthy eating when compared to Diabetes Australia.
"When we looked at it closely, the differences were really only very minor and what was found was that 80% of the advice from one organisation was consistent with other organisations, so we're now being encouraged to focus on that 80% that is the same across the board and throughout the world."
Ultimately, Professor Prins concluded the most effective way to lose weight was simply to lessen calorie intake.
"The single best way to lose weight is changing food intake," he said.
"It's a very simple equation: to lose half a kilo per week, you need to eat 500 calories less each day than you actually require; and obviously, to lose a kilo per week, you need to eat 1000 calories less."
Professor Prins also suggested relying on exercise alone to lose weight was ineffective.
"If you do a combination of food and exercise, your diet becomes much more effective, but exercise should not be used to lose weight, it should be used to maintain health and fitness," he said.

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