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Wrong John McGreevy?

John T. McGreevy

Dean, College of Arts and Letters

University of Notre Dame

HQ Phone:  (574) 631-6000

Direct Phone: (574) ***-****direct phone

Email: j***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Notre Dame

100 Eck Visitors Center

Notre Dame, Indiana,46556

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1842, the University of Notre Dame provides a distinctive voice in higher education that is at once rigorously intellectual, unapologetically moral in orientation, and firmly embracing of a service ethos. The nation's pre-eminent Catholic university...more

Background Information

Employment History

Member, Faculty

University of Notre Dame


Affiliations

Notre Dame

Historian


Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies

Board Member


U.S. Catholicism

Historian


St. Joseph's House

Founder


Education

B.A.

University of Notre Dame


Ph.D.

ND


Ph.D.

Stanford University


Web References(121 Total References)


Religion and American Culture : University of California Press | Journals + Digital Publishing

www.ucpressjournals.com [cached]

John T. McGreevy, University of Notre Dame


distributistreview.com

There is a fascinating article co-authored by Christopher Hamlin and John T. McGreevy, both of the University of Notre Dame, entitled, "The Greening of America, Catholic Style: 1930-1950."1 It chronicles the rise and fall of the "green revolution" philosophy advocated by the National Catholic Rural Life Conference during much of its peak years.2 It is a compelling narrative, both for its depth and comprehensiveness, and is an impressive display of historical analysis.
Hamlin and McGreevy are among the few in contemporary Catholic intellectual circles who seemed to have noticed that there was, in fact, a robust effort on the part of many to bring Catholic intellectual tradition, specifically the social tradition, to bear upon the circumstances of Catholic rural life. What occupies Hamlin and McGreevy, in other words, was not so much the movement's rise and demise as the remarkable invisibility of the organization, dead or alive, among Catholic social historians. Or as Hamline and McGreevy put it, stewardship was an extension of cosmology. In conclusion, if I have one reservation about Hamlin and McGreevy's overall work, it would concern their predilection for eulogy.


Events | The Catholic Beat

thecatholicbeat.sacredheartradio.com [cached]

Professor John McGreevy, Professor of History and Dean, College of Arts & Letters, University of Notre Dame will deliver the College's annual public lecture, which will focus on the curious story of an exiled Swiss Jesuit tarred and feathered by a Protestant mob in New England, and what it says about both the Catholic Church and Democracy in America.


www.catholicworldreport.com

—John T. McGreevy, American Jesuits and the World , 2016. [2]
Professor McGreevy, the chairman of the history department at the University of Notre Dame, takes up this same theme only now as it directly affects the United States in the 19th and early 20th centuries. McGreevys book is a thorough work of historical reflection, a delight to read. His approach is, as it were, from the particular to the universal. That is, he selects some five places and individual Jesuits associated with each to illustrate his overall thesis about the world coming to Jesuits and Jesuits going out into the world. One place that McGreevy describes is in Maine, another in Missouri, one in Louisiana, one in Philadelphia, and, finally, one in Manila. In the context of the history of these places, McGreevy supports and illustrates his observations about the Jesuit connection to world Catholicism and world problems. He is also mindful of the universal academic tradition that Jesuits brought with them wherever they went. But the sites that McGreevy does choose are vivid instances of his general thesis—Jesuits learn about the world because the world first came to them. McGreevy often cites a 19th-century Jesuit journal in New Mexico called Revista Catolica . Until current persecutions and civil unrest there, aside from some Lebanese immigrants, few non-Jews came from the Middle East. The slave economy had assured that we would have people from Africa as part of our national experience from early years. The Jesuits relation to this issue, which McGreevy touches on, remains a lively controversy even today. From the time of the French Jesuit missions in Canada and the northern United States, Jesuit relations with the American Indians have been and still are an abiding concern in Jesuit missionary activity and thinking. [4] McGreevy pays a good deal of attention to the various Indian tribes and issues. He even notes the tension that arouse at times in the Order over its most important goals. Were they education or missionary work among the Indians? McGreevy recounts the saga of American and foreign-born American Jesuits as they try to assimilate and eventually justify this new doctrine that, in effect, mostly aided them in their work in spite of the bigotry they often encountered. In the beginning of these comments, I cited a passage from Robert Gannon and another from John McGreevy. I think McGreevy is probably right in this interpretation. All the careful spiritual and philosophic works of the past seem irrelevant in comparison of the drama of ever-changing world issues—the theological road leading to the 1960s, as McGreevy put it. But I am also impressed that McGreevy sensed, though fleetingly, that suddenly all the work comprising the global Church notion is back-firing in the light of more current events. McGreevy does not develop these last points. But his noting them in the light of his own thesis is both welcome and insightful. The same John told us that the Word was made flesh and dwelt amongst us. [2] John T. McGreevy, American Jesuits  and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton: Princeton University Press 2016). 216.


NCRLC - "A Response to 'The Greening of America, Catholic Style'" by Dr. Christopher Thompson

www.ncrlc.com [cached]

There is a fascinating article co-authored by Christopher Hamlin and John T. McGreevy, both of the University of Notre Dame, entitled, "The Greening of America, Catholic Style: 1930-1950.
Hamlin and McGreevy are among the few in contemporary Catholic intellectual circles who seemed to have noticed that there was, in fact, a robust effort on the part of many to bring Catholic intellectual tradition, specifically the social tradition, to bear upon of the circumstances of Catholic rural life. What occupies Hamlin and McGreevy, in other words, was not so much the movement's rise and demise as the remarkable invisibility of the organization, dead or alive, among Catholic social historians. Or as Hamline and McGreevy put it, stewardship was an extension of cosmology. In conclusion, if I have one reservation about Hamlin and McGreevy's overall work, it would concern their predilection for eulogy.


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