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This profile was last updated on 11/11/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. John W. Henney Jr.

Wrong John W. Henney Jr.?

Superintendent

Local Address: Kansas City, Missouri, United States
Wiley Carriage Shop
 
Background

Employment History

  • Superintendent of the Plant

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Secretary
    Gold and Copper Mining Co.
13 Total References
Web References
This item has the signatures of ...
scripophily.net, 11 Nov 2012 [cached]
This item has the signatures of the Company's President, Jerome H. Remick and Secretary, John W. Henney and is over 113 years old.
...
The certificate was issued to John W. Henney and was signed on the back in 1927 by John W. Henney, Jr., as Executor of John W. Henney, Sr.'s Estate.
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST! Certificate Vignette
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST! John W. Henney's Signature as Secretary
...
John W. Henney, Jr.'s Signature on Back
...
John W. Henney
The secretary of the company was John W. Henney.
...
In 1929 Henney produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis-and in 1930-1931 came the Henney passenger car piece-de-resistance. It happened principally because John W. Henney, Jr. - who had followed in his father's footsteps in the family business in 1912 - was a good friend of Errett Lobban Cord's and was challenged to come up with a car equally as classy as those Cord was purveying in Indiana. The convertible sedan that resulted was a handsome thing, powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on a 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis, just like the new L-29 Cord. Only four examples were built and sold to friends or undertaking clients of Henney's.
...
John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay. He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop. He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City. In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years. He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.
In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities. The first Freeport plant was at South Chicago Avenue and West Jackson Street. John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the plant in 1912, when he was 29. Mr. Henney's nephew, John Henney Smithe, recalled when the first plant was torn down to make way for a new building to fill the east half of the block between Chicago, Jackson, Van Buren and Spring Streets.
...
John W. Henney, Jr. went back into business as the John W. Henney Co. in 1917, building truck bodies in the Maurer building on the railroad and the river bank. He also used the old Lena Casket Company building nearby (in East Freeport) to make walnut gun stocks for the government.
When the Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, the Henney Company moved back into the building. The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and its business was making motor hearses and later, ambulances.
John W. Henney, Jr. sold out in 1928 before the stock market crash. He bought back in later and in 1931 was again head of the company, continuing until 1946, the year of his death.
...
In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29. A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end. Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915. Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River. Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine. Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
Big Four Gold and Copper Mining (Signed by Car Maker John W. Henney and Remick Music Corporation Founder, Jerome H. Remick) , Colorado 1899
www.wallstreetarchives.com, 21 Oct 2008 [cached]
This item has the signatures of the Company's President, Jerome H. Remick and Secretary, John W. Henney and is over 107 years old.
...
The certificate was issued to John W. Henney and was signed on the back in 1927 by John W. Henney, Jr., as Executor of John W. Henney, Sr.'s Estate.
...
John W. Henney, Jr.'s Signature on Back
...
John W. Henney
The secretary of the company was John W. Henney.
...
In 1929 Henney produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis—and in 1930-1931 came the Henney passenger car piece-de-resistance. It happened principally because John W. Henney, Jr. — who had followed in his father's footsteps in the family business in 1912 — was a good friend of Errett Lobban Cord's and was challenged to come up with a car equally as classy as those Cord was purveying in Indiana. The convertible sedan that resulted was a handsome thing, powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on a 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis, just like the new L-29 Cord. Only four examples were built and sold to friends or undertaking clients of Henney's.
...
John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay. He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop. He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City. In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years. He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.
In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities. The first Freeport plant was at South Chicago Avenue and West Jackson Street. John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the plant in 1912, when he was 29. Mr. Henney's nephew, John Henney Smithe, recalled when the first plant was torn down to make way for a new building to fill the east half of the block between Chicago, Jackson, Van Buren and Spring Streets.
...
John W. Henney, Jr. went back into business as the John W. Henney Co. in 1917, building truck bodies in the Maurer building on the railroad and the river bank. He also used the old Lena Casket Company building nearby (in East Freeport) to make walnut gun stocks for the government.
When the Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, the Henney Company moved back into the building. The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and its business was making motor hearses and later, ambulances.
John W. Henney, Jr. sold out in 1928 before the stock market crash. He bought back in later and in 1931 was again head of the company, continuing until 1946, the year of his death.
...
In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29. A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end. Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915. Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River. Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine. Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
Big Four Gold and Copper Mining (Signed by Car Maker John W. Henney and Remick Music Corporation Founder, Jerome H. Remick) , Colorado 1899
www.robinsoft.com, 24 Sept 2008 [cached]
This item has the signatures of the Company's President, Jerome H. Remick and Secretary, John W. Henney and is over 107 years old.
...
The certificate was issued to John W. Henney and was signed on the back in 1927 by John W. Henney, Jr., as Executor of John W. Henney, Sr.'s Estate.
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!Certificate Vignette
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!John W. Henney's Signature as Secretary
...
John W. Henney, Jr.'s Signature on Back
...
John W. Henney
The secretary of the company was John W. Henney.
...
In 1929 Henney produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis—and in 1930-1931 came the Henney passenger car piece-de-resistance.It happened principally because John W. Henney, Jr. — who had followed in his father's footsteps in the family business in 1912 — was a good friend of Errett Lobban Cord's and was challenged to come up with a car equally as classy as those Cord was purveying in Indiana.The convertible sedan that resulted was a handsome thing, powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on a 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis, just like the new L-29 Cord.Only four examples were built and sold to friends or undertaking clients of Henney's.
...
John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay.He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop.He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City.In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years.He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.
In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities.The first Freeport plant was at South Chicago Avenue and West Jackson Street.John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the plant in 1912, when he was 29.Mr. Henney's nephew, John Henney Smithe, recalled when the first plant was torn down to make way for a new building to fill the east half of the block between Chicago, Jackson, Van Buren and Spring Streets.
...
John W. Henney, Jr. went back into business as the John W. Henney Co. in 1917, building truck bodies in the Maurer building on the railroad and the river bank.He also used the old Lena Casket Company building nearby (in East Freeport) to make walnut gun stocks for the government.
When the Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, the Henney Company moved back into the building.The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and its business was making motor hearses and later, ambulances.
John W. Henney, Jr. sold out in 1928 before the stock market crash.He bought back in later and in 1931 was again head of the company, continuing until 1946, the year of his death.
...
In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29.A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end.Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915.Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River.Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine.Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
Big Four Gold and Copper Mining (Signed by Car Maker John W. Henney and Remick Music Corporation Founder, Jerome H. Remick) , Colorado 1899
www.geotek.com, 6 Dec 2007 [cached]
This item has the signatures of the Company's President, Jerome H. Remick and Secretary, John W. Henney and is over 107 years old.
...
The certificate was issued to John W. Henney and was signed on the back in 1927 by John W. Henney, Jr., as Executor of John W. Henney, Sr.'s Estate.
...
John W. Henney, Jr.'s Signature on Back
...
John W. Henney
The secretary of the company was John W. Henney.
...
In 1929 Henney produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis-and in 1930-1931 came the Henney passenger car piece-de-resistance.It happened principally because John W. Henney, Jr. - who had followed in his father's footsteps in the family business in 1912 - was a good friend of Errett Lobban Cord's and was challenged to come up with a car equally as classy as those Cord was purveying in Indiana.The convertible sedan that resulted was a handsome thing, powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on a 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis, just like the new L-29 Cord.Only four examples were built and sold to friends or undertaking clients of Henney's.
...
John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay.He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop.He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City.In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years.He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.
In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities.The first Freeport plant was at South Chicago Avenue and West Jackson Street.John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the plant in 1912, when he was 29.Mr. Henney's nephew, John Henney Smithe, recalled when the first plant was torn down to make way for a new building to fill the east half of the block between Chicago, Jackson, Van Buren and Spring Streets.
...
John W. Henney, Jr. went back into business as the John W. Henney Co. in 1917, building truck bodies in the Maurer building on the railroad and the river bank.He also used the old Lena Casket Company building nearby (in East Freeport) to make walnut gun stocks for the government.
When the Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, the Henney Company moved back into the building.The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and its business was making motor hearses and later, ambulances.
John W. Henney, Jr. sold out in 1928 before the stock market crash.He bought back in later and in 1931 was again head of the company, continuing until 1946, the year of his death.
...
In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29.A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end.Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915.Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River.Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine.Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
Big Four Gold and Copper Mining (Signed by Car Maker John W. Henney and Remick Music Corporation Founder, Jerome H. Remick) , Colorado 1899
www.giftofhistory.com, 15 Oct 2006 [cached]
This item has the signatures of the Company's President, Jerome H. Remick and Secretary, John W. Henney and is over 107 years old.
...
The certificate was issued to John W. Henney and was signed on the back in 1927 by John W. Henney, Jr., as Executor of John W. Henney, Sr.'s Estate.
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!Certificate Vignette
Scripophily.com is a name you can TRUST!John W. Henney's Signature as Secretary
...
John W. Henney, Jr.'s Signature on Back
...
John W. Henney
The secretary of the company was John W. Henney.
...
In 1929 Henney produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis-and in 1930-1931 came the Henney passenger car piece-de-resistance.It happened principally because John W. Henney, Jr. - who had followed in his father's footsteps in the family business in 1912 - was a good friend of Errett Lobban Cord's and was challenged to come up with a car equally as classy as those Cord was purveying in Indiana.The convertible sedan that resulted was a handsome thing, powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on a 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis, just like the new L-29 Cord.Only four examples were built and sold to friends or undertaking clients of Henney's.
...
John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay.He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop.He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City.In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years.He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.
In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities.The first Freeport plant was at South Chicago Avenue and West Jackson Street.John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the plant in 1912, when he was 29.Mr. Henney's nephew, John Henney Smithe, recalled when the first plant was torn down to make way for a new building to fill the east half of the block between Chicago, Jackson, Van Buren and Spring Streets.
...
John W. Henney, Jr. went back into business as the John W. Henney Co. in 1917, building truck bodies in the Maurer building on the railroad and the river bank.He also used the old Lena Casket Company building nearby (in East Freeport) to make walnut gun stocks for the government.
When the Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, the Henney Company moved back into the building.The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and its business was making motor hearses and later, ambulances.
John W. Henney, Jr. sold out in 1928 before the stock market crash.He bought back in later and in 1931 was again head of the company, continuing until 1946, the year of his death.
...
In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29.A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end.Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915.Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River.Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine.Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
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