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Wrong John Henney?

Mr. John W. Henney Jr.

Owner

Henney Buggy Company

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Henney Buggy Company

Background Information

Affiliations

Secretary
Gold and Copper Mining Co.

Web References (14 Total References)


Featured Items | Professionalcar.org

www.professionalcar.org [cached]

Building on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine, Henney was located in Freeport, Illinois.

...
The funeral coaches built by Henney in 1926 coaches included stylish cycle fenders and shortened running boards with integral step plates beneath each door. Options included a choice of a single side-entrance attendant's door or an extra-wide double side door that allowed easy access for a gurney or casket. More expensive coaches featured landau-bars, spot-lights and stylish Gordon spare tire covers and offered customers the choice of a Meritas-covered body or an all metal-skin body sprayed with Dupont's new DUCO lacquer. The 1926 catalog displayed Henney's popular 7-passenger landau sedan-ambulance as well as their new Light Six line which was designed to compete with the Mort and other low-priced coaches.
The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and shortly thereafter John W. Henney Jr. sold his interest in the firm roughly a year before the stock market crash in 1929. During his absence, the Henney Motor Co. produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis as well as their normal professional car line. They also supplied 3-piece ash roof rails to Ford, who used the sub-assemblies on the 1929 Model A Fordor body framework.
From the late twenties until the adoption of the Packard chassis in 1937, Henney frequently mixed-n-matched chassis and engines from different manufacturers. Chassis used in varying amounts during this period included Stephens (one assembled in their factory using a Continental motor); Velie/Buick/Auburn (using Lycoming motors); Pierce Arrow/Reo (a special car marketed by National Casket); Pontiac economy model and the Oldsmobile Progress Model. In addition, they occasionally built a hearse or an ambulance on a chassis specified and/or supplied by the customer. This could have been a Cadillac, LaSalle, Rolls Royce, Lincoln, Cord and others.
In 1927, Henney introduced the NU-3-Way coach, a funeral car equipped with a three-way casket table patented by Los Angeles inventor, William H. Heise.
...
A bronze Heise tag can be found on the table framework of Henney's 3-way coaches.
Mr. Henney was repelled by the way hearses had to be backed up to the curb for loading, which he thought was very undignified.
...
The 3-way feature added about $100.00 to the price of the car but Henney did very well with it. Henney was soon selling more than half the 3-ways in the industry, and they sold side-servicing equipment, including the mound, track and carrier to some of their competitors.
The Henney Deluxe line continued mostly unchanged as did their lower-priced Light-Six models which were easily distinguishable by their old-fashioned artillery wheels. Henney coaches were offered with either a leather-back landau roof or a plain painted metal roof treatment. As always, plain, frosted, leaded or combination frosted/leaded windows were available on all of their coaches.
In 1928 Henney was awarded a government contract to supply 23 ambulances to the United States Veterans Bureau (now the Veterans Administration) for use at their medical facilities. In the same year, the NU-3-Way funeral coach featured prominently in their print advertising.
...
Henney claimed that the wide pillar-less door opening could support over 1500 lbs. at its center. Heavy wrought-iron bracing placed within the strong ash-framing made it possible.
During that year, Henney launched what amounted to a smear campaign against Eureka, Sayers & Scovill, Meteor and Silver-Knightstown falsely accusing them of marketing side-servicing coaches built with bootleg casket tables. Ads that appeared in the nations funeral and mortuary magazines falsely stated that Henney was the exclusive licensee of the patented Heise casket table. In 1930 Eureka, Meteor and Sayers & Scovill filed suit against Henney and eventually won an injunction against them. In a year when they could ill afford it, Henney's victims' business suffered, while Henney's prospered.
As a direct result of their attack on Eureka, Henney won a contract to supply REO-chassised coaches to the National Casket Company who had just canceled their contract with Kissel because Eureka supplied Kissel with their funeral coach bodies.
Having survived the stock market crash of 1929 with his cash reserves intact, John W. Henney Jr. easily regained control of the company in 1930 and soon conceived a high-priced luxury car similar to the L-29 of his good friend, Errett Lobban Cord. The magnificent convertible sedan that resulted was powered by a Lycoming straight-eight engine and set on Henney's 137 wheelbase chassis. Only four examples were built and all were sold to Henney's friends and large customers. 1930 and 1931 Henneys rode on a purpose-built chassis that closely resembled that of the auto industry's style leader, Cadillac. Their ambulances were advertised as being completely equipped, and their NU-3-Way side-loading coaches were racking up sales at the expense of their competition. In addition to the frosted/leaded/beveled or plain rear quarter-window options, new interior window treatments were avail-able as well and included wicker window inserts, mini-blinds or airline-style draperies.
Henney offered the industry's first electric-powered casket table in 1932 which was designed by William H. Heise, the designer of the original 3-way table.
...
Unfortunately, Pierce-Arrow went bankrupt during the 1937-1938 model year, so Henney looked to Packard to furnish chassis for their high-priced coaches. By the end of 1935 Henney introduced the popular Henney 800 series that was built on a Packard 120A chassis.
The Funeral Auto Company of Louisville, Kentucky purchased eight identical Arrowline funeral coaches during 1936. Funeral Auto Co. were just one of the many funeral livery services across the country that rented out hearses and limousines to metropolitan funeral directors who either couldn't afford to own one, or didn't have the room to park these huge coaches at their place of business. As it is today, hearses are an extra-cost item in most funeral services and can be rented as needed by smaller funeral homes. In large cities like New York City, the cost of parking a large coach can quickly exceed its cost, so funeral and limousine livery services remain popular to this day. Henney also built a handful of 1935 and 1936 coaches on stretched Auburn chassis. Henny Arrowlines were built from 1934 to 1937.
By 1936 both Packard and General Motors were offering extended-wheelbase commercial chassis to the professional car industry. The Packard chassis was based on their successful 120 Series while General Motor's were offered by their Buick, Cadillac, LaSalle and Oldsmobile divisions. Consequently all Henney coaches were built on purpose-built Oldsmobile and Packard commercial chassis from 1936 onward. 1937 was the final year for Henney Progress Oldsmobile coaches as Henney made a permanent switch to the Packard chassis in 1938 and would remain with them until their demise in 1954.
At the 1937 National Funeral Director's Convention, Henney introduced a stream-lined flower car as well as a self-leveling suspension system that they called the Leveldraulic.
...
Late in 1939, Henney proclaimed that the current years production of 1200 vehicles was the largest number of funeral cars and ambulances ever produced by one company in a single year.
...
Long wheel-base airport limousines were in great demand during the late 1930s and Henney built a number of 8-door (4-doors per side) using extended-wheelbase Packard chassis.
...
Henney also manufactured a small number of sedan-ambulances using standard Packard limousines with a removable B-pillar that could accept a gurney through the passenger-side doors as well as a few multi-door airport limousines built using stretched sedan chassis.
...
Henney was the largest professional car builder in the country yet only managed to produce 300 vehicles before the firm turned to war production work early in the year. Civil Defense vehicles were in short supply at the start of the war and Henney filled the void with a number of attractive vehicles purpose-built for domestic service. Henney deserves credit for being the first professional-car manufacturer to produce a modern modular-styled ambulance body. Built on a Packard chassis, the extra-wide box-back ambulance included room for four patients and was painted with an art-deco paint scheme that integrated beautifully with the cross-shaped windows. Later versions included black-out trim and just like today's retired modular ambulances, the boxy Civil Defense Henneys were popular as used work-trucks during the late Forties and early Fifties.
John W. Henney, owner of the Henney Motor Company, son and namesake of the firms founder, died in Freeport, Illinois on November 26, 1946 and the family sold the firm to C. Russell Feldmann, a millionaire businessman whose original claim to fame was 1927s Transitone radio, one of the first units designed for mobile use exclusively for installation in an automobile.
...
Production finally exceeded demand in mid-1947 and Henney re-tooled in preparation for production of their brand-new 1948 coaches that were unveile


Henney, Henney Motor Co., John W. Henney, C. Russell Feldmann, Henney Coach, Packard-Henney, Freeport - Coachbuilt.com

www.coachbuilt.com [cached]

His son, John W. Henney, born in 1842 learned the carriage building trade under his father's watchful eye and left the firm to apprentice with several regional firms before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop of Kansas City, Missouri. John returned to Cedarville in 1868 and assumed control of his father's shop, modernizing it with steam power and modern milling machinery, being one of the first builders in the nation to utilize it. His business and reputation grew and in 1879 he moved the business to Freeport naming it, John W. Henney & Company. The first Henney plant was located adjacent to Freeport's main rail line on South Chicago Ave and West Jackson St. Most of their early business was focused on fine carriages and buggies, but they also offered a line of commercial vehicles and funeral coaches starting in the late 1890s.

In 1912 Henney's son and namesake, John W. Henney, Jr. became superintendent of the busy plant at the age of 29. A new larger plant was constructed that totally filled half of a city block, but his timing was unfortunate as the golden age of carriage building was coming to an end. Now called the Henney Buggy Company, the firm was eventually liquidated and the modern factory sold to the Moline Plow Company in 1915. Moline enlarged the plant and built the Stephens Salient Six automobile there from 1916 to 1924.
With plenty of cash in hand, young John W. Henney, Jr. was soon back in business as the John W. Henney Co. after purchasing the former Maurer building which was conveniently located between the Illinois Central Railroad lines and the Pacotonica River. Early production consisted of truck bodies and a motorized Henney funeral coach was added late in 1916, built on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine. Henney also purchased the building now known as the Lena Casket Company in East Freeport to make wooden frames for the coach bodies as well as walnut gun stocks for the US Army.
...
In a speech given to the Professional Car Society in 1978, H. Reid Horner, Henney's director of personnel from June 1928 through November 1954 recalled that the firm utilized Dodge Brothers chassis in the period immediately following World War I.
...
The Moline Plow Company liquidated the Stephens car operations in 1924, and Henney moved back into their old building offering a full line of limousine-style coaches on their own assembled chassis which included a 70hp Continental six-cylinder engine. In addition to their distinctive cycle-style front fenders (Henney's resembled the popular Kissel Kar), these unusual coaches were now available with imitation leather - called Meritas fabric, a nitrile-coated imitation leather similar to Zapon - stretched over an ash frame. Like a Weymann, the body was incredibly light and the heavy Meritas fabric prevented the drumming frequently heard in other coachbuilt metal-bodied vehicles. Meritas-covered bodies were anywhere from 300 to 500 lbs lighter than a comparable metal-clad body.
A new funeral coach for 1924 was the landau-limousine, a Meritas-bodied coach which featured a Meritas-covered top with nickel-plated landau bars on the very attractive rounded rear quarters. Henney also offered a Meritas-clad short-wheelbase combination sedan-ambulance that also featured the increasingly popular landau bars.
...
The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and shortly thereafter John W. Henney Jr. sold his interest in the firm roughly a year before the stock market crash in 1929. During his absence the Henney Motor Co. produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis as well as their normal professional car line. They also supplied 3-piece ash roof rails to Ford who used the sub-assemblies on the 1929 Model A Fordor body framework.
According to H. Reid Horner, from the late twenties until the adoption of the Packard chassis in 1937, Henney frequently mixed-n-matched chassis and engines from different manufacturers.
...
In 1927 Henney introduced the NU-3-Way coach, a funeral car equipped with a three-way casket table patented by a Los Angeles inventor, William H. Heise.
...
A bronze Heise tag can be found on the table framework of Henney's 3-way coaches.
Horner recalled:
"Mr. Henney was repelled at the way hearses had to be backed up to the curb for loading, which he thought was very undignified.
...
The 3-way feature added about $100.00 to the price of the car but Henney did very well with it. Henney was soon selling more than half the 3-ways in the industry, and we sold side-servicing equipment, including the mound, track and carrier to some of our competitors."
The Henney Deluxe line continued mostly unchanged as did their lower-priced Light-Six models which were easily distinguishable by their old-fashioned artillery wheels. Henney coaches were offered with either a leather-back landau roof or a plain painted-metal roof treatment. As always, plain, frosted, leaded or combination frosted/leaded windows were available on all of their coaches.
In 1928 Henney was awarded a government contract to supply 23 ambulances to the United States Veterans Bureau (now the Veterans Administration) for use at their medical facilities. The NU-3-Way funeral coach featured prominently in their print advertising.
...
Henney claimed that the wide pillarless door opening could support over 1500 lbs. at its center. Heavy wrought-iron bracing placed within the strong ash-framing made it possible.
During the year, Henney launched what amounted to a smear campaign against Eureka, Sayers & Scovill, Meteor and Silver-Knightstown falsely accusing them of marketing side-servicing coaches built with bootleg casket tables. Ads that appeared in the nations funeral and mortuary magazines falsely stated that Henney was the exclusive licensee of the patented Heise casket table. In 1930 Eureka, Meteor and Sayers & Scovill filed suit against Henney and eventually won an injunction against them. In a year when they could ill afford it, Henney's victims' business suffered, while Henney's prospered.
As a direct result of their attack on Eureka, Henney won a contract to supply REO-chassised coaches to the National Casket Company who had just canceled their contract with Kissel because Eureka supplied Kissel with their funeral coach bodies.
Having survived the crash with his cash reserves, John W. Henney Jr. easily regained control of the company in 1930 and soon conceived a high-priced luxury car similar to the L-29 of his good friend, Errett Lobban Cord. The magnificent convertible sedan that resulted was powered by a Lycoming straight-eight and set on Henney's 137-1/2-inch wheelbase chassis. Only four examples were built and all were sold to Henney's friends and large customers.
1930 and 1931 Henney's rode on a purpose-built chassis that closely resembled that of the auto industry's style leader, Cadillac. Their ambulances were advertised as being completely equipped, and their NU-3-Way side-loading coaches were racking up sales at the expense of their competition. In addition to the frosted/leaded/beveled or plain rear quarter-window options, new interior window treatments were available as well and included wicker window inserts, mini-blinds or airline-style draperies.
Henney offered the industry's first electric-powered casket table in 1932 which was designed by William H. Heise, the designer of the original 3-way table.
...
Henney introduced beaver-tail styling to their coach bodies in 1933. By 1934 they had abandoned assembly of their own chassis and were building on Cadillac, Lincoln, Oldsmobile, Packard and Pierce-Arrow chassis. Less expensive models were built primarily on Oldsmobile chassis during the mid-Thirties and were designated as Henney Progress coaches. Heise's electric 3-way casket table was marketed as the "Elecdraulic" and was standard equipment on a few high-priced NU-3-Way coaches. The Henny Arrowline was introduced in 1934 and was built exclusively on Pierce-Arrow chassis. Unfortunately, Pierce-Arrow went bankrupt during 1937-8, so Henney looked to Packard to furnish chassis for their high-priced coaches. By the end of 1935 Henney introduced the popular Henney 800 series that was built on a Packard 120A chassis. The Funeral Auto Company of Louisville, Kentucky purchased eight identical Arrowline funeral coaches during 1936. Funeral Auto Co. were just one of the many funeral livery services across the country that rented out hearses and limousines to metropolitan funeral directors who either couldn't afford to own one, or didn't have the room to park these huge coaches at their place of business. As today, hearses are an extra-cost item in most funeral services and can be rented as needed by smaller funeral homes. In large cities like New York City, the cost of parking a large coach can quickly exceed its cost, so funeral and limousine livery services remain popular to this day. Henney also built a handful of 1935-36 coaches on stretched Auburn chassis. Henny Arrowlines were built from 1934-1937.
...
1937 was the final year for Oldsmobile-chassised Henney-Progress coaches


Features | Professionalcar.org

www.professionalcar.org [cached]

Building on an assembled chassis with a six-cylinder Continental engine, Henney was located in Freeport, Illinois.

...
The funeral coaches built by Henney in 1926 coaches included stylish cycle fenders and shortened running boards with integral step plates beneath each door. Options included a choice of a single side-entrance attendant's door or an extra-wide double side door that allowed easy access for a gurney or casket. More expensive coaches featured landau-bars, spot-lights and stylish Gordon spare tire covers and offered customers the choice of a Meritas-covered body or an all metal-skin body sprayed with Dupont's new DUCO lacquer. The 1926 catalog displayed Henney's popular 7-passenger landau sedan-ambulance as well as their new Light Six line which was designed to compete with the Mort and other low-priced coaches.
The name of the business was changed to the Henney Motor Company in 1927 and shortly thereafter John W. Henney Jr. sold his interest in the firm roughly a year before the stock market crash in 1929. During his absence, the Henney Motor Co. produced 100 taxicabs on stretched Model A Ford chassis as well as their normal professional car line. They also supplied 3-piece ash roof rails to Ford, who used the sub-assemblies on the 1929 Model A Fordor body framework.
From the late twenties until the adoption of the Packard chassis in 1937, Henney frequently mixed-n-matched chassis and engines from different manufacturers.
...
In 1927, Henney introduced the NU-3-Way coach, a funeral car equipped with a three-way casket table patented by Los Angeles inventor, William H. Heise.
...
A bronze Heise tag can be found on the table framework of Henney's 3-way coaches.
Mr. Henney was repelled by the way hearses had to be backed up to the curb for loading, which he thought was very undignified.
...
The 3-way feature added about $100.00 to the price of the car but Henney did very well with it. Henney was soon selling more than half the 3-ways in the industry, and they sold side-servicing equipment, including the mound, track and carrier to some of their competitors.
The Henney Deluxe line continued mostly unchanged as did their lower-priced Light-Six models which were easily distinguishable by their old-fashioned artillery wheels. Henney coaches were offered with either a leather-back landau roof or a plain painted metal roof treatment. As always, plain, frosted, leaded or combination frosted/leaded windows were available on all of their coaches.
In 1928 Henney was awarded a government contract to supply 23 ambulances to the United States Veterans Bureau (now the Veterans Administration) for use at their medical facilities. In the same year, the NU-3-Way funeral coach featured prominently in their print advertising.
...
Henney claimed that the wide pillar-less door opening could support over 1500 lbs. at its center. Heavy wrought-iron bracing placed within the strong ash-framing made it possible.
During that year, Henney launched what amounted to a smear campaign against Eureka, Sayers & Scovill, Meteor and Silver-Knightstown falsely accusing them of marketing side-servicing coaches built with bootleg casket tables. Ads that appeared in the nations funeral and mortuary magazines falsely stated that Henney was the exclusive licensee of the patented Heise casket table. In 1930 Eureka, Meteor and Sayers & Scovill filed suit against Henney and eventually won an injunction against them. In a year when they could ill afford it, Henney's victims' business suffered, while Henney's prospered.
As a direct result of their attack on Eureka, Henney won a contract to supply REO-chassised coaches to the National Casket Company who had just canceled their contract with Kissel because Eureka supplied Kissel with their funeral coach bodies.
Having survived the stock market crash of 1929 with his cash reserves intact, John W. Henney Jr. easily regained control of the company in 1930 and soon conceived a high-priced luxury car similar to the L-29 of his good friend, Errett Lobban Cord. The magnificent convertible sedan that resulted was powered by a Lycoming straight-eight engine and set on Henney's 137 wheelbase chassis. Only four examples were built and all were sold to Henney's friends and large customers. 1930 and 1931 Henneys rode on a purpose-built chassis that closely resembled that of the auto industry's style leader, Cadillac. Their ambulances were advertised as being completely equipped, and their NU-3-Way side-loading coaches were racking up sales at the expense of their competition. In addition to the frosted/leaded/beveled or plain rear quarter-window options, new interior window treatments were avail-able as well and included wicker window inserts, mini-blinds or airline-style draperies.
Henney offered the industry's first electric-powered casket table in 1932 which was designed by William H. Heise, the designer of the original 3-way table.
...
Unfortunately, Pierce-Arrow went bankrupt during the 1937-1938 model year, so Henney looked to Packard to furnish chassis for their high-priced coaches. By the end of 1935 Henney introduced the popular Henney 800 series that was built on a Packard 120A chassis.
The Funeral Auto Company of Louisville, Kentucky purchased eight identical Arrowline funeral coaches during 1936. Funeral Auto Co. were just one of the many funeral livery services across the country that rented out hearses and limousines to metropolitan funeral directors who either couldn't afford to own one, or didn't have the room to park these huge coaches at their place of business. As it is today, hearses are an extra-cost item in most funeral services and can be rented as needed by smaller funeral homes. In large cities like New York City, the cost of parking a large coach can quickly exceed its cost, so funeral and limousine livery services remain popular to this day. Henney also built a handful of 1935 and 1936 coaches on stretched Auburn chassis. Henny Arrowlines were built from 1934 to 1937.
By 1936 both Packard and General Motors were offering extended-wheelbase commercial chassis to the professional car industry. The Packard chassis was based on their successful 120 Series while General Motor's were offered by their Buick, Cadillac, LaSalle and Oldsmobile divisions. Consequently all Henney coaches were built on purpose-built Oldsmobile and Packard commercial chassis from 1936 onward. 1937 was the final year for Henney Progress Oldsmobile coaches as Henney made a permanent switch to the Packard chassis in 1938 and would remain with them until their demise in 1954.
At the 1937 National Funeral Director's Convention, Henney introduced a stream-lined flower car as well as a self-leveling suspension system that they called the Leveldraulic.
...
Late in 1939, Henney proclaimed that the current years production of 1200 vehicles was the largest number of funeral cars and ambulances ever produced by one company in a single year.
...
Long wheel-base airport limousines were in great demand during the late 1930s and Henney built a number of 8-door (4-doors per side) using extended-wheelbase Packard chassis.
...
Henney also manufactured a small number of sedan-ambulances using standard Packard limousines with a removable B-pillar that could accept a gurney through the passenger-side doors as well as a few multi-door airport limousines built using stretched sedan chassis.
...
Henney was the largest professional car builder in the country yet only managed to produce 300 vehicles before the firm turned to war production work early in the year. Civil Defense vehicles were in short supply at the start of the war and Henney filled the void with a number of attractive vehicles purpose-built for domestic service. Henney deserves credit for being the first professional-car manufacturer to produce a modern modular-styled ambulance body. Built on a Packard chassis, the extra-wide box-back ambulance included room for four patients and was painted with an art-deco paint scheme that integrated beautifully with the cross-shaped windows. Later versions included black-out trim and just like today's retired modular ambulances, the boxy Civil Defense Henneys were popular as used work-trucks during the late Forties and early Fifties.
John W. Henney, owner of the Henney Motor Company, son and namesake of the firms founder, died in Freeport, Illinois on November 26, 1946 and the family sold the firm to C. Russell Feldmann, a millionaire businessman whose original claim to fame was 1927s Transitone radio, one of the first units designed for mobile use exclusively for installation in an automobile.
...
Production finally exceeded demand in mid-1947 and Henney re-tooled in preparation for production of their brand-new 1948 coaches that were unveiled at the 1947 National Funeral Director's Convention. Contrary to popular belief, Henney only built Packard limousines for the 1946-47 model year. 1948-50 Packard limousines were built by Briggs as Henney was too busy building hearses and ambulances to do any extra contract work, even for Packard, an important business partner.
...
In order to provide adequate interior headroom and maneuverability for the casket and gurne


Bank History -

$reference.hostName [cached]

Lalon Farwell was the first president and John Henney, President of Henney Buggy Company was the vice president. The first location for the main office was opposite the courthouse in what was then known as Maynards's Block in Freeport, Illinois.  An interesting fact about the association was that four times a year, they issued shares of stock for $100 each.  This was considered a large sum of money, so payment plans were offered to small investors with a monthly payment of just $0.25!  Union Loan and Building Association continued on a steady growth pattern and eventually changed the bank name to our current name of UNION Savings BANK.


Stephenson County Historical Society: Changing Exhibit

www.stephcohs.org [cached]

John W. Henney, his son, was a boy of 12 when the family returned to stay. He learned the woodworker's trade, and carriage building and painting in his father's shop. He worked in several cities in the Midwest before becoming superintendent of the Wiley Carriage Shop in Kansas City. In 1868 he returned to Cedarville and took over the family shop, forerunner of the large business he was to develop over the years. He equipped it with the steam power and modern machinery, and the Henney vehicles soon established their reputation.

In 1879 he reorganized the business as John W. Henney & Company and moved it to Freeport where there were railroad shipping facilities.

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