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Wrong John Hart?

John Hart

Scientific Director

Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation Inc

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation Inc

129 Pinckney Street

Circleville, Ohio,43113

United States

Company Description

The acronym "Lukuru" is derived from the names of the two major water routes within the original Lukuru Project (see Our Projects page) zone, the Lukuru and the SankuruRiver. It was born in 1992 through the ideology of the ethnic groups living within the Lukur...more

Background Information

Employment History

Finance Manager

Cornell University


Course Operations Coordinator

Tough Mudder


Plant Breeder

EarthWork Seeds


Lessonopolis

www.lessonopolis.com


New York University

New York Ciity


Postdoctoral Research Geneticist

U.S. Department of Agriculture


President

Western Connecticut State University


Scientific Director Lukuru Foundation

WCS (Computers)


Head Photographer

Brown Harris Stevens/Real Estate


Affiliations

Center for Forest Conservation and Research

Founder


Education

Bachelor's degree

Carleton College


Doctorate degree

Michigan State University


Master's degree

Michigan State University


Ph.D.

Cornell University


Web References(163 Total References)


Our People - Blank Title

lukuru.org [cached]

John Hart, PhD Directeur Scientifique et Technique
John brought more than three decades of central African field conservation experience when he joined the Lukuru Foundation in 2006. Having led research in the Salonga NP, Kahuzi-Biega NP, Itombwe, and the TL2 forest blocks, he contributes vast expertise in methodology, research, analysis, and evaluation covering both plant ecology, animal life, and the indigenous community interface. he first came to DRCongo in 1973 to live with and document the ecology of the Mbuti Pygmies in the southern Ituri Forest. In 1980 John and Terese Hart began a rigorous study of the Okapi which led to a pivotal position with the Wildlife Conservation Society. John received both his Doctorate degree and Master's degree from Michigan State University; and his Bachelor's degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. His extensive achievements have earned him multiple honors, including the 2010 Parker Gentry Award for Conservation from the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois; the 1997 Distinguished Achievement Award from the Carleton College Alumni Association; the 1996 Presidential Award from the Chicago Zoological Society. he is a contributing author to several books and has published articles in peer-reviewed and popular wildlife and conservation journals and magazines.


New monkey species discovered in Africa | Great News Network

www.greatnewsnetwork.org [cached]

- Dr John Hart of the Lukuru Foundation, who led the project
A new species of monkey has been identified in Africa, the first one in 28 years, say scientists.


FAU first to video newly discovered population of monkeys thought to be nearing extinction | EurekAlert! Science News

www.eurekalert.org [cached]

Detwiler jumped at the opportunity to bring the dryas project to her lab when her collaborator John Hart, Ph.D., scientific director of the Lukuru Foundation, revealed the discovery.


Research | News Channel - Mind Processors

news.mindprocessors.com [cached]

"When I first saw it, I immediately knew it was something new and different - I just didn't know how significant it was," said John Hart, a veteran Congo researcher who is scientific director for the Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation, based in Kinshasa.
In fact, the find was something of a happy accident. Hart first spied the suspect monkey in 2007 while sifting through photographs brought back from a recently concluded field expedition to a remote region of the central Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly known as Zaire). It was a gorgeous animal, Hart said, with a blond mane and upper chest, and a bright red patch on the lower back. "I'd never seen that on any animal in the area, so right away I said, 'Hmmm,'" he told OurAmazingPlanet.


news.mindprocessors.com

"When I first saw it, I immediately knew it was something new and different - I just didn't know how significant it was," said John Hart, a veteran Congo researcher who is scientific director for the Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation, based in Kinshasa.
In fact, the find was something of a happy accident. Hart first spied the suspect monkey in 2007 while sifting through photographs brought back from a recently concluded field expedition to a remote region of the central Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly known as Zaire). It was a gorgeous animal, Hart said, with a blond mane and upper chest, and a bright red patch on the lower back. "I'd never seen that on any animal in the area, so right away I said, 'Hmmm,'" he told OurAmazingPlanet. Hart decided to get to the bottom of the mystery. Fast forward through five years of field work, genetic research and anatomical study, and on Wednesday, Hart and a list of collaborators formally introduced to the world a new primate species, dubbed Cercopithecus lomamiensis, and known locally as the lesula. "They have giant blue backsides," Hart said. "Bright aquamarine buttocks and testicles. What a signal! Now that the new species has been formally identified, Hart said, the next task is to save it. Although the lesula is new to science, it is a well-established sight on the dinner table. What's for dinner There's a thriving market for bush meat, particularly in urban areas, Hart said, and the monkeys are just one of dozens of species, from snakes to elephants to apes, that are targeted. "People have disposable income, and this is the cheapest meat," he said. "Bush meat is a go-to item because it's less expensive than chicken or beef. This is not a new problem, but it's a problem that doesn't have a solution yet." Hart and his wife, Terese, are partnering with local people to try to set up a national park in the lesulas' territory, but it's still a work in progress. In the meantime, researchers have set up camera traps in the dense forest to try to better understand the habits of the shy animals. Georgette, the girl whose lesula companion started it all, is now 18. "The animal was very attached to her," Hart said. But one day the monkey disappeared. "It was suspected that somebody in town had taken it in," Hart said.


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