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Wrong John Hart?

John Hart

Wildlife Biologist

U.S. Department of Agriculture

HQ Phone:  (202) 720-2791

Direct Phone: (218) ***-****direct phone

Email: j***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20250

United States

Company Description

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Bestselling Novelist

The New York Times Company


Scientific Director

Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation Inc


Senior Conservation Zoologist

Wildlife Conservation Society


Finance Manager

Cornell University


Course Operations Coordinator

Tough Mudder LLC


Postdoctoral Research Geneticist

USDA


Plant Breeder

EarthWork Seeds Inc.


Professor and Adjunct. Photography and Storyboards.

New York University


Lessonopolis

www.lessonopolis.com


New York University

New York Ciity


Head Photographer

BROWN HARRIS STEVENS LLC


Scientific Director Lukuru Foundation

WCS (Computers)


President

Western Connecticut State University


Affiliations

Center for Forest Conservation and Research

Founder


Education

Bachelor's degree

Carleton College


Doctorate degree

Michigan State University


Master's degree

Michigan State University


Web References(163 Total References)


MN Teams with USDA Sharpshooters to Contain CWD, on the DeerWire from BuckBreeders.com

buckbreeders.com [cached]

"Right now, it looks like we're on the front end of this," USDA District Supervisor and Wildlife Biologist John Hart said about the 2016 discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease in Southeastern Minnesota.
Hart is heading up the USDA sharpshooters in the Fillmore County area. "We mostly do wildlife damage and work from a disease surveillance standpoint," he explained. For example, the Wildlife Services department of the USDA has dealt with beavers building dams that caused damage to water and roadways and wolves attacking livestock and pets. "My sense is that this is the only thing that could be done at this point to get a handle on it," Hart said concerning the DNR's plan of action for containing and eliminating CWD. "The concern is that if this waited another year or two, the Chronic Wasting Disease could expand out of the concentrated area it's in right now." Seven deer tested positive for CWD during the special hunt, bringing the total of infected deer in the area to nine. The USDA sharpshooters have harvested just over 100 deer since they began their contract on February 20. So far, none have tested positive for CWD, but as Hart pointed out, many of the samples are still pending results. "That ratchets up our concern where that dead deer was found, so we're really focusing our attention there," Hart explained. "There's a lot of logistics involved to move people and equipment 300 miles," Hart commented. The sharpshooters are only allowed to work on state property or on private property if they have the landowner's permission. So far, about 25 area landowners have allowed the sharpshooters to shoot deer on their land. Baits are put down to concentrate the number of deer in an area and put the deer in a safe shooting environment, which allows the sharpshooters to better accomplish their job. "We try to be as low-key as possble," Hart said. Most of the harvesting is done at night or in the late afternoon. The sharpshooters use thermal imaging, which allows them to see the deer's heat signature. "It's a good way to find deer to target and adds an element of safety because we can see better at night with it," Hart explained. "The DNR has told us for sure to go through the 10th or 11th of March and potentially through the 19th," Hart said. "It depends on a lot of factors, but mostly on deer numbers like if we collect enough deer to make it worthwhile to have us here." "I've really been impressed with the people in the area," Hart noted. "We've had good cooperation from the landowners, business owners, and the people in the community. It's really an unfortunate situation that CWD was found here, but you have a really sensible local population that understands the need for this project and has been supporting it." "Because there's CWD in Iowa and Wisconsin, I think Southeast Minnesota will always be a focal point for surveillance for the DNR, but whether our (USDA Wildlife Services) participation is required again or not really remains to be seen," Hart said. Hart expressed his appreciation of the local communities for allowing his team to their work. "I want to remind folks that they can play a big part of this next fall during hunting season," he added, explaining that the DNR will want to continue to take samples to ensure that CWD has been eliminated from the area. People with questions about the DNR's CWD plan are encouraged to call (651) 895-7434. Specific questions regarding the USDA shooting project can be directed to John Hart at (218) 244-4651.


Pigeons Cause Destruction - Intrusion Pest Control

intrusionpest.com [cached]

Keeping pigeons off bridges usually requires a multi-pronged strategy that can include netting to block holes and surfaces, spikes to keep them from landing, and sometimes poisoning, shooting or trapping the birds, said John Hart, a Grand Rapids, Minn.-based wildlife biologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


www.buckbreeders.com

"Right now, it looks like we're on the front end of this," USDA District Supervisor and Wildlife Biologist John Hart said about the 2016 discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease in Southeastern Minnesota.
Hart is heading up the USDA sharpshooters in the Fillmore County area. "We mostly do wildlife damage and work from a disease surveillance standpoint," he explained. For example, the Wildlife Services department of the USDA has dealt with beavers building dams that caused damage to water and roadways and wolves attacking livestock and pets. "My sense is that this is the only thing that could be done at this point to get a handle on it," Hart said concerning the DNR's plan of action for containing and eliminating CWD. "The concern is that if this waited another year or two, the Chronic Wasting Disease could expand out of the concentrated area it's in right now." Seven deer tested positive for CWD during the special hunt, bringing the total of infected deer in the area to nine. The USDA sharpshooters have harvested just over 100 deer since they began their contract on February 20. So far, none have tested positive for CWD, but as Hart pointed out, many of the samples are still pending results. "That ratchets up our concern where that dead deer was found, so we're really focusing our attention there," Hart explained. "There's a lot of logistics involved to move people and equipment 300 miles," Hart commented. The sharpshooters are only allowed to work on state property or on private property if they have the landowner's permission. So far, about 25 area landowners have allowed the sharpshooters to shoot deer on their land. Baits are put down to concentrate the number of deer in an area and put the deer in a safe shooting environment, which allows the sharpshooters to better accomplish their job. "We try to be as low-key as possble," Hart said. Most of the harvesting is done at night or in the late afternoon. The sharpshooters use thermal imaging, which allows them to see the deer's heat signature. "It's a good way to find deer to target and adds an element of safety because we can see better at night with it," Hart explained. "The DNR has told us for sure to go through the 10th or 11th of March and potentially through the 19th," Hart said. "It depends on a lot of factors, but mostly on deer numbers like if we collect enough deer to make it worthwhile to have us here." "I've really been impressed with the people in the area," Hart noted. "We've had good cooperation from the landowners, business owners, and the people in the community. It's really an unfortunate situation that CWD was found here, but you have a really sensible local population that understands the need for this project and has been supporting it." "Because there's CWD in Iowa and Wisconsin, I think Southeast Minnesota will always be a focal point for surveillance for the DNR, but whether our (USDA Wildlife Services) participation is required again or not really remains to be seen," Hart said. Hart expressed his appreciation of the local communities for allowing his team to their work. "I want to remind folks that they can play a big part of this next fall during hunting season," he added, explaining that the DNR will want to continue to take samples to ensure that CWD has been eliminated from the area. People with questions about the DNR's CWD plan are encouraged to call (651) 895-7434. Specific questions regarding the USDA shooting project can be directed to John Hart at (218) 244-4651.


www.wolf.org

Keeping the Wolf from the Door, by John Hart, wildlife biologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Wildlife Services program in Minnesota


www.wolf.org

By John Hart, Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Wildlife Services, Minnesota


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