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Wrong John Caruso?

John H. Caruso

Senior Professor of the Practice Emeritus

Tulane University

HQ Phone:  (504) 865-5000

Direct Phone: (504) ***-****direct phone

Email: j***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Tulane University

1430 Tulane Avenue

New Orleans, Louisiana,70122

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1834, Tulane is one of the most highly regarded and selective independent research universities in the United States. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, we take pride in being a part of this select group of 63 universi...more

Background Information

Web References(10 Total References)


GOMAEEN: All News Page

www.gulfallianceeducation.org [cached]

The names will be revealed in print and officially recognized at that time, said John H. Caruso, a deep-sea biologist at Tulane University.
Caruso, along with others, has been reviewing Chakrabarty's work. Still, the discovery is not exactly a novelty, Caruso said, since such announcements are regularly made. But it does shed further light on just how much more there is to learn, he added. "Especially in the deeper waters," Caruso said.


pdx2gulfcoast.com

More Alternative Energy, Less Dispersants: Meeting With Professor John Caruso
Alternative energies according to John Caruso, Professor of Ecology and Evolution at Tulane University. Caruso's specialty is marine ichthyology and some of our group met Caruso and his wife, Pamela, for a lovely brunch meeting this past Sunday.


www.infoyu.net

If the phytoplankton and zooplankton are killed, it's curtains," said John Caruso, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor at Tulane University.


www.livescience.com

"The greatest threat is to the whole food chain, and the base of the food chain, said John Caruso, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor at Tulane University.
"People see the big impressive animals like pelicans and the other sea birds. It's a devastating sight, it tears you up when you see those poor birds covered in oil, but the real damage to our coastal ecosystem here will come from destruction of the cord grasses." In particular, the cord and Spartina grasses that grow on the coast of Louisiana are crucial to the ecosystem and especially sensitive to the oil leak, Caruso said. These grasses form the foundation of the local food chain, and their root systems lessen the erosion of the small islands that protect inland Louisiana from hurricanes, Caruso said. The oil kills the grass both with its poisonous chemicals and by simply coating the plants, which suffocates them, Caruso said. And the death of that grass has profound consequences for the rest of the wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico, Caruso said. Similarly, the massive die-off of the tiny plants and animals called plankton will also profoundly weaken the local ecosystem. "If you affect those communities in any way, you affect the entire food chain. If the phytoplankton and zooplankton are killed, it's curtains," Caruso told LiveScience. The timing of the leak has increased the magnitude of the spill's effects on plankton, Caruso said. During the spring and early summer, plankton and other organisms at the base of the food chain reproduce in the shallow water on the Gulf of Mexico. The newborn critters that result are particularly vulnerable to the oil, Caruso said. As for vertebrates like birds and sharks, the major consequences of the oil leak will occur later, said Caruso. Even though birds coated in oil will die, or face difficulty after cleaning, the degradation of the food chain will cause larger problems for these animals over a longer span of time, Caruso said.


www.calacademy.org

The article includes an interview John Caruso, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor at Tulane University:
In particular, the cord and Spartina grasses that grow on the coast of Louisiana are crucial to the ecosystem and especially sensitive to the oil leak, Caruso said. These grasses form the foundation of the local food chain, and their root systems lessen the erosion of the small islands that protect inland Louisiana from hurricanes, Caruso said. The other small creatures they include are phytoplankton and zooplankton: During the spring and early summer, plankton and other organisms at the base of the food chain reproduce in the shallow water on the Gulf of Mexico. The newborn critters that result are particularly vulnerable to the oil, Caruso said. As for vertebrates like birds and sharks, the major consequences of the oil leak will occur later, said Caruso. Even though birds coated in oil will die, or face difficulty after cleaning, the degradation of the food chain will cause larger problems for these animals over a longer span of time, Caruso said.


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