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2016-03-04T00:00:00.000Z

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John Godman

HQ Phone: (203) 235-7077

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Advanced Turbine Services LLC

780 Old Colony Road

Meriden, Connecticut 06451

United States

Company Description

Advanced Turbine Services is a small company operating since 1995 and was initially founded specifically to assist the US Navy in the support of their TF40B engine fleet of the LCAC hovercraft. Since then ATS has been providing reliable turbine engine mod ... more

Find other employees at this company (4)

Background Information

Employment History

Powerplant Engineer

Textron Inc.

Education

two-year degree

aviation repair

University of Tulsa

Web References (8 Total References)


Email Newsletter

www.meridenbiz.com [cached]

John Godman, President of Advanced Turbine Services, recently acquired 137 South Colony Street and has great plans to expand his turbine business.

The company benefited from the City's Enterprise Zone tax abatement program.
The property at 137 South Colony Street has an illustrious past that includes mobsters and the production of ales, lagers, and porters with an annual capacity of 100,000 barrels. John Godman's plans are a bit more conventional but his decision to completely renovate the Circa 1887 building for his manufacturing business is great news for downtown Meriden.
Advanced Turbine Services, LLC, is currently located in a 5,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility at 34 High Street in Meriden. The company provides turbine engine repair and overhaul services to both the United States Navy and a variety of commercial clients. According to Godman's website at www.aux-pwr.com the company's goal is to become the leading provider of repairs and service to businesses with marine and industrial turbine powered equipment.
In order to achieve that goal, Godman needs to expand. The 137 South Colony Street site is an underperforming piece of property that is located in Meriden's Enterprise Zone. Because Godman will be increasing his square footage to 10,000 and creating approximately 15 new jobs over the next two years, he'll be eligible for a five-year, 80% abatement on new real and personal property. "John's plans include interior and exterior improvements, roof repair, trash removal and landscaping," says Trudy Magnolia, Economic Development Assistant.


MeridenBiz.com - City of Meriden Economic Development Office

www.meridenbiz.com [cached]

John Godman, President of Advanced Turbine Services, recently acquired 137 South Colony Street and has great plans to expand his turbine business.

The company benefited from the City's Enterprise Zone tax abatement program.
The property at 137 South Colony Street has an illustrious past that includes mobsters and the production of ales, lagers, and porters with an annual capacity of 100,000 barrels.John Godman's plans are a bit more conventional but his decision to completely renovate the Circa 1887 building for his manufacturing business is great news for downtown Meriden.
Advanced Turbine Services, LLC, is currently located in a 5,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility at 34 High Street in Meriden.The company provides turbine engine repair and overhaul services to both the United States Navy and a variety of commercial clients.According to Godman's website at www.aux-pwr.com the company's goal is to become the leading provider of repairs and service to businesses with marine and industrial turbine powered equipment.
In order to achieve that goal, Godman needs to expand.The 137 South Colony Street site is an underperforming piece of property that is located in Meriden's Enterprise Zone.Because Godman will be increasing his square footage to 10,000 and creating approximately 15 new jobs over the next two years, he'll be eligible for a five-year, 80% abatement on new real and personal property."John's plans include interior and exterior improvements, roof repair, trash removal and landscaping," says Trudy Magnolia, Economic Development Assistant.


Record-Journal

www.record-journal.com [cached]

John Godman, owner and president of Advanced Turbine Services LLC on High Street in Meriden, checks on the equipment used to test fuel valves that his company repairs for the U.S. Navy. (Photos by Chris French / Record-Journal)

MERIDEN - The whirring of the turbine in a nearby box is deafening, but necessary to read the pressure gauges on the engine parts.
John Godman is testing a fuel valve limiter for use by the U.S. Navy on the engines used to power its Landing Craft Air Cushion.
According to the U.S. Navy, the Landing Craft Air Cushion is a high-speed, over-the-beach fully amphibious landing craft, capable of carrying a 60-75 ton payload.It is used to transport the weapons systems, equipment, cargo and personnel of the assault elements of the Marine Air Ground Task Force from ship to shore across the beach.
But to Godman, it delivers much more.
As one of the only small businesses licensed to repair the gas turbines engines and engine systems that power the LCAC, Godman is pleased that the Navy is so happy with them.
AD (_middle)
Godman is the owner of Advanced Turbine Services LLC, a repair shop and parts warehouse for the engines and their systems.The Meriden resident, services a variety of commercial clients, but so far the Navy is the most lucrative.His company is one of a few that has developed and produced a powered energy system to test TF40 engines.Some of the fastest efficient ships in use today, including ferries, yachts and swath vessels, are TF40 powered, he explains.
And he's about to get more business and expand into other engine lines.
Godman has been at the 34 High St. plant since opening his business in 1995.He had been seeking a larger home for four years.A broker finally let him know that 137 South Colony St. was available and eligible for Enterprise Zone tax benefits.City officials call it an underperforming piece of property.Godman says that's an understatement.
"It's the ugliest building downtown," Godman said.
Indeed.The former home of the Connecticut Valley Brewing Corp. and more recently, a welding company, has turned into a crumbling home for tree roots and the area homeless.He paid $121,000 for the building and the acre it sits on.
Godman has a vision of a restored work area and has already begun clearing much of the brush in the area.He also plans to make interior and exterior improvements, roof repair, trash removal and landscaping, said Trudy Magnolia, Economic Development Assistant.The brick walls are more than a foot thick.
The Economic Development office has worked extensively with Godman linking him with the 50,000 square-foot building and helping him make the necessary application for the tax benefits.
According to Magnolia, because Godman is expanding and plans to hire about 15 new employees over the next few years, he'll be eligible for a five-year, 80 percent abatement on new real and personal property.
...
But Godman is in no rush.
"I got time," he said.
...
Godman, who rides a Harley and golfs everyday he can, believes in setting milestones to create goals.Buying the building was a goal that took about six months longer than expected to close on.Now he can clear the lot so that architect Dana Warren of Middlefield can make the drawings and submit a site plan to the city for approval.
Contracting with the Navy means maintaining certain specifications - a fenced-in yard, for instance, and the insurance costs have quadrupled.But Godman can only work for one person - himself - and he wanted to stay in the city.
"My family grew up here," Godman said.
...
Godman got his training as a child growing up in Pottstown, Pa., next to a steel town named Phoenixville.He always loved tinkering with engines.
"My mother bought more lawnmowers than I can remember," he said.
After graduating high school in 1972, he went to work in the steel mill for four years until, like many others in Pennsylvania, it closed.
"Phoenixville was a one-horse town and they shot the horse," Godman said.
Now out of a job and without a trade, he rejected the federal job training programs available for displaced workers because he wasn't happy with the trade selection.He wanted to repair aircraft.
He applied for student loans and was accepted at the University of Tulsa, where he received a two-year degree in aviation repair.After graduation, he was recruited as a line mechanic for Pan Am and TWA airlines, but turned down those offers.
Lycoming in Stratford was developing engines for large clients such as Honeywell, and hired Godman as a test engineer.He commuted from his Meriden home every day from 1980 to 1990 and made his first contact with the Navy by training its employees in engine repair.
That led to consulting work, and eventually a full-time repair and inventory business.
Godman is now one of several Navy contractors involved in the Navy's cost-saving equipment maintenance program, that routinely services vessels to prolong their useful life.
His new building will provide the needed storage to stock and record the parts as he repairs them and the full inventory is available to customers via his Web site.There's also an overhead pulley for the engines, which are about the size of an office desk.
It's a big jump, but one Godman looks forward to and is glad he could stay in the city.He proves that through his volunteer coaching for Ed Walsh Little League and YMCA youth soccer and other community activities.
City Economic Development Director Peggy Brennan said Godman is an example of what can happen downtown when the city works to keep its businesses here
...
"Godman is a very interesting guy - one of the most naturally positive people I have met since I've been in Meriden," Brennan said.


Record-Journal

www.record-journal.com [cached]

John Godman, owner and president of Advanced Turbine Services LLC on High Street in Meriden, checks on the equipment used to test fuel valves that his company repairs for the U.S. Navy. (Photos by Chris French / Record-Journal)

MERIDEN - The whirring of the turbine in a nearby box is deafening, but necessary to read the pressure gauges on the engine parts.
John Godman is testing a fuel valve limiter for use by the U.S. Navy on the engines used to power its Landing Craft Air Cushion.
According to the U.S. Navy, the Landing Craft Air Cushion is a high-speed, over-the-beach fully amphibious landing craft, capable of carrying a 60-75 ton payload.It is used to transport the weapons systems, equipment, cargo and personnel of the assault elements of the Marine Air Ground Task Force from ship to shore across the beach.
But to Godman, it delivers much more.
As one of the only small businesses licensed to repair the gas turbines engines and engine systems that power the LCAC, Godman is pleased that the Navy is so happy with them.
AD (_middle)
Godman is the owner of Advanced Turbine Services LLC, a repair shop and parts warehouse for the engines and their systems.The Meriden resident, services a variety of commercial clients, but so far the Navy is the most lucrative.His company is one of a few that has developed and produced a powered energy system to test TF40 engines.Some of the fastest efficient ships in use today, including ferries, yachts and swath vessels, are TF40 powered, he explains.
And he's about to get more business and expand into other engine lines.
Godman has been at the 34 High St. plant since opening his business in 1995.He had been seeking a larger home for four years.A broker finally let him know that 137 South Colony St. was available and eligible for Enterprise Zone tax benefits.City officials call it an underperforming piece of property.Godman says that's an understatement.
"It's the ugliest building downtown," Godman said.
Indeed.The former home of the Connecticut Valley Brewing Corp. and more recently, a welding company, has turned into a crumbling home for tree roots and the area homeless.He paid $121,000 for the building and the acre it sits on.
Godman has a vision of a restored work area and has already begun clearing much of the brush in the area.He also plans to make interior and exterior improvements, roof repair, trash removal and landscaping, said Trudy Magnolia, Economic Development Assistant.The brick walls are more than a foot thick.
The Economic Development office has worked extensively with Godman linking him with the 50,000 square-foot building and helping him make the necessary application for the tax benefits.
According to Magnolia, because Godman is expanding and plans to hire about 15 new employees over the next few years, he'll be eligible for a five-year, 80 percent abatement on new real and personal property.
...
But Godman is in no rush.
"I got time," he said.
...
Godman, who rides a Harley and golfs everyday he can, believes in setting milestones to create goals.Buying the building was a goal that took about six months longer than expected to close on.Now he can clear the lot so that architect Dana Warren of Middlefield can make the drawings and submit a site plan to the city for approval.
Contracting with the Navy means maintaining certain specifications - a fenced-in yard, for instance, and the insurance costs have quadrupled.But Godman can only work for one person - himself - and he wanted to stay in the city.
"My family grew up here," Godman said.
...
Godman got his training as a child growing up in Pottstown, Pa., next to a steel town named Phoenixville.He always loved tinkering with engines.
"My mother bought more lawnmowers than I can remember," he said.
After graduating high school in 1972, he went to work in the steel mill for four years until, like many others in Pennsylvania, it closed.
"Phoenixville was a one-horse town and they shot the horse," Godman said.
Now out of a job and without a trade, he rejected the federal job training programs available for displaced workers because he wasn't happy with the trade selection.He wanted to repair aircraft.
He applied for student loans and was accepted at the University of Tulsa, where he received a two-year degree in aviation repair.After graduation, he was recruited as a line mechanic for Pan Am and TWA airlines, but turned down those offers.
Lycoming in Stratford was developing engines for large clients such as Honeywell, and hired Godman as a test engineer.He commuted from his Meriden home every day from 1980 to 1990 and made his first contact with the Navy by training its employees in engine repair.
That led to consulting work, and eventually a full-time repair and inventory business.
Godman is now one of several Navy contractors involved in the Navy's cost-saving equipment maintenance program, that routinely services vessels to prolong their useful life.
His new building will provide the needed storage to stock and record the parts as he repairs them and the full inventory is available to customers via his Web site.There's also an overhead pulley for the engines, which are about the size of an office desk.
It's a big jump, but one Godman looks forward to and is glad he could stay in the city.He proves that through his volunteer coaching for Ed Walsh Little League and YMCA youth soccer and other community activities.
City Economic Development Director Peggy Brennan said Godman is an example of what can happen downtown when the city works to keep its businesses here
...
"Godman is a very interesting guy - one of the most naturally positive people I have met since I've been in Meriden," Brennan said.


MeridenBiz.com - City of Meriden Economic Development Office

www.meridenbiz.com [cached]

John Godman is testing a fuel valve limiter for use by the U.S. Navy on the engines used to power its Landing Craft Air Cushion.

According to the U.S. Navy, the Landing Craft Air Cushion is a high-speed, over-the-beach fully amphibious landing craft, capable of carrying a 60-75 ton payload.It is used to transport the weapons systems, equipment, cargo and personnel of the assault elements of the Marine Air Ground Task Force from ship to shore across the beach.
But to Godman, it delivers much more.
As one of the only small businesses licensed to repair the gas turbines engines and engine systems that power the LCAC, Godman is pleased that the Navy is so happy with them.
Godman is the owner of Advanced Turbine Services LLC, a repair shop and parts warehouse for the engines and their systems.The Meriden resident, services a variety of commercial clients, but so far the Navy is the most lucrative.His company is one of a few that has developed and produced a powered energy system to test TF40 engines.Some of the fastest efficient ships in use today, including ferries, yachts and swath vessels, are TF40 powered, he explains.
And he's about to get more business and expand into other engine lines.
Godman has been at the 34 High St. plant since opening his business in 1995.He had been seeking a larger home for four years.A broker finally let him know that 137 South Colony St. was available and eligible for Enterprise Zone tax benefits.City officials call it an underperforming piece of property.Godman says that's an understatement.
"It's the ugliest building downtown," Godman said.
Indeed.The former home of the Connecticut Valley Brewing Corp. and more recently, a welding company, has turned into a crumbling home for tree roots and the area homeless.He paid $121,000 for the building and the acre it sits on.
Godman has a vision of a restored work area and has already begun clearing much of the brush in the area.He also plans to make interior and exterior improvements, roof repair, trash removal and landscaping, said Trudy Magnolia, Economic Development Assistant.The brick walls are more than a foot thick.
The Economic Development office has worked extensively with Godman linking him with the 50,000 square-foot building and helping him make the necessary application for the tax benefits.
According to Magnolia, because Godman is expanding and plans to hire about 15 new employees over the next few years, he'll be eligible for a five-year, 80 percent abatement on new real and personal property.
...
But Godman is in no rush.
"I got time," he said.
...
Godman, who rides a Harley and golfs everyday he can, believes in setting milestones to create goals.Buying the building was a goal that took about six months longer than expected to close on.Now he can clear the lot so that architect Dana Warren of Middlefield can make the drawings and submit a site plan to the city for approval.
Contracting with the Navy means maintaining certain specifications - a fenced-in yard, for instance, and the insurance costs have quadrupled.But Godman can only work for one person - himself - and he wanted to stay in the city.
"My family grew up here," Godman said.
...
Godman got his training as a child growing up in Pottstown, Pa., next to a steel town named Phoenixville.He always loved tinkering with engines.
"My mother bought more lawnmowers than I can remember," he said.
After graduating high school in 1972, he went to work in the steel mill for four years until, like many others in Pennsylvania, it closed.
"Phoenixville was a one-horse town and they shot the horse," Godman said.
Now out of a job and without a trade, he rejected the federal job training programs available for displaced workers because he wasn't happy with the trade selection.He wanted to repair aircraft.
He applied for student loans and was accepted at the University of Tulsa, where he received a two-year degree in aviation repair.After graduation, he was recruited as a line mechanic for Pan Am and TWA airlines, but turned down those offers.
Lycoming in Stratford was developing engines for large clients such as Honeywell, and hired Godman as a test engineer.He commuted from his Meriden home every day from 1980 to 1990 and made his first contact with the Navy by training its employees in engine repair.
That led to consulting work, and eventually a full-time repair and inventory business.
Godman is now one of several Navy contractors involved in the Navy's cost-saving equipment maintenance program, that routinely services vessels to prolong their useful life.
His new building will provide the needed storage to stock and record the parts as he repairs them and the full inventory is available to customers via his Web site.There's also an overhead pulley for the engines, which are about the size of an office desk.
It's a big jump, but one Godman looks forward to and is glad he could stay in the city.He proves that through his volunteer coaching for Ed Walsh Little League and YMCA youth soccer and other community activities.
City Economic Development Director Peggy Brennan said Godman is an example of what can happen downtown when the city works to keep its businesses here
...
"Godman is a very interesting guy - one of the most naturally positive people I have met since I've been in Meriden," Brennan said.

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