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This profile was last updated on 9/25/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. John M. Frame

Wrong Dr. John M. Frame?

Professor of Systematic Theology ...

Phone: (601) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: j***@***.edu
Local Address: Orlando, Florida, United States
Reformed Theological Seminary
5422 Clinton Blvd.
Jackson , Mississippi 39209
United States

Company Description: Reformed Theological Seminary was founded in 1966 and is one of the largest seminaries in the country with campuses in Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Jackson,...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • A.B.
    Princeton University
  • B.D.
    Westminster Theological Seminary
  • D.D.
    Belhaven College
199 Total References
Web References
A Response to “Redeeming the Arts†« StoneWorks: A Global Arts Initiative
stoneworks-arts.org, 25 Sept 2014 [cached]
By John M. Frame
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John M. Frame was raised in Pittsburgh, PA. He taught at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia from 1968-80, at Westminster in California from 1980-2000, and is now Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. He has published ten books, including Doctrine of the Knowledge of God and Apologetics to the Glory of God. He enjoys playing piano and organ. He and his wife Mary have two daughters and three sons.
Reformed Pendulum :: Who We Are
reformedpendulum.com, 2 Sept 2014 [cached]
John Frame
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Frame received degrees from Princeton University (A.B.), Westminster Theological Seminary (B.D.), Yale University (A.M. and M.Phil., though he was working on a doctorate and admits his own failure to complete his dissertation),and Belhaven College (D.D.). He has served on the faculty of Westminster Theological Seminary and was a founding faculty member of their California campus, and as of 2007 he holds the J. D. Trimble Chair of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. Frame is well known in Reformed circles for his many books, chapters, and articles. He is also a classically trained musician and a critic of film, music, and other media.
Reformed Sermons
reformedsermons.org, 23 Aug 2014 [cached]
Dr. John M. Frame Reformed Sermons
Reformed Sermons
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Dr. John M. Frame only
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Dr. John M. Frame
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Dr. John M. Frame
Dr. John M. Frame is Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, FL.
124 Audio results for: John Frame Displaying page 1 of 13 Audio results per page. Doctrine of the Knowledge of God: Justification of Knowledge and Method in Apologetics - 04 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Doctrine of the Knowledge of God: Justification of Knowledge and Method in Apologetics - 03 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Doctrine of the Knowledge of God: Justification of Knowledge and Method in Apologetics - 02 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Doctrine of the Knowledge of God: Justification of Knowledge and Method in Apologetics - 01 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Lesson 4: The Normative Perspective: Parts & Aspects of Scripture by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Lesson 3: The Normative Perspective: The Attributes of Scripture by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Lesson 5: The Situational Perspective: Revelation and Situation by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Topics in Apologetics: Apologetics as Proof and Defense - 04 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Topics in Apologetics: Apologetics as Proof and Defense - 03 by: Dr. John M. Frame
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Topics in Apologetics: Apologetics as Proof and Defense - 02 by: Dr. John M. Frame
John ...
www.frame-poythress.org [cached]
John Frame
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An Interview with John Frame by Marco Gonzalez
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Home> Blog> An Interview with John Frame by Marco Gonzalez
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John Frame (b. 1939) - Is a Reformed Presbyterian, superb theologian and a theology professor at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando (formerly at WTS). At RTS he teaches Apologetics & The History of Philosophy and Christian Thought. The content of his works include in-depth explorations of biblical doctrine while remaining easily accessible for the average reader. Many of his students appreciate his charitable spirit and willingness to take a hard look at both sides of the issue. He is known for treating the opposing view fairly before demolishing it. His arguments against libertarianism are particularly effective. Rev. Frame is a musician, media critic and is committed to the work of ministry and training pastors.
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We have five children: Debbie, Doreen, and Skip, who live on the west coast with families of their own, and Justin (19) and Johnny (17) who live with us.
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Rev. Frame. Thank you for your time and for sharing these valauble insights. To read more of Rev. Frame's essays, take the time to explore his writings at http://www.frame-poythress.org/
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The Works of John Frame and Vern Poythress
John ...
www.frame-poythress.org [cached]
John Frame
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An Email Debate Between Darryl Hart and John Frame
Note, 2006 (JF): In 1998, some students organized an email debate between Darryl Hart, then librarian at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and John Frame, then Professor of Apologetics and Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in California.
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As of now (12:00AM 2/5/97), no emails from anyone other than John Frame or Darryl Hart will be processed by the list for the duration of the RPW debate.
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4. DIRECT QUESTIONING OF ONE ANOTHER (Frame to ask the first question, per coin toss (on a 1948 two shilling piece) - THIS PORTION OF THE DEBATE WILL NOT RUN MORE THAN 14 DAYS
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John Frame
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Frame."2
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Mary and I have by our own marriage two boys, Justin (11) and Johnny (9).
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Prof. Frame's initial statement accomplishes almost by a sleight of hand what some readers may miss because of wanting to understand the RPW. In his rather common sensical approach to defining the RPW he distinguishes between historical (what I would call "descriptive") and normative meanings. Again, this should strike most of us as quite level headed, especially when he goes on to say that the RPW historically may mean one thing in Puritanism but another in the Bible.
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And it is this antagonism or, at least tension, between the Bible and the Reformed tradition that bothers me and it is what bothered me about Prof. Frame's book on worship, Worship In Spirit and Truth.
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Rather, what is very disconcerting is the matter-of-fact way that Prof. Frame leads us to this conclusion. I don't sense any regret, hesitation, or any of the angst that plagued Luther as he took his stand against the tradition of the church.
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32 and questions 96 to 98 in the Heidelberg Catechism, so it isn't exclusively British.) Could it be that what we really have is Frame's RPW against the Puritan RPW?
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In other words, the matter-of-factness of Prof. Frame's statement distorts just how serious the issues involved in it are.
I apologize for going over my suggested limit of 750 words, but I want to make one more point before ending. It concerns Prof. Frame's effort to extend the biblical RPW to all of life since the whole of the believer's life, and not just worship, is rendered as service and praise to God. This extension, though sounding devout, is a ready-made argument for theonomy.
By limiting the RPW to corporate worship, the Westminster Divines were putting limits upon church power and the power it has over individual consciences. In public worship the session may bind the consciences of believers as long as they have scriptural warrant for all that is done (or have a good and necessary deduction from the Bible). But by extending the RPW to all of life Prof. Frame appears to want to give the session power to bind the consciences of believers in all areas of their vocation and Christian walk.
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Today some Presbyterians, Prof. Frame among them, say that the Westminster Standards (now 350 years old) are dated on worship.
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In which case, Prof. Frame's distinction between the historical and normative definitions is not so easy to pull off, since the historical and the normative will naturally overlap.
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I wonder that if Prof. Frame considered the importance of liberty of conscience more he might understand what's at stake in the RPW and not be as worried about the organizational unity of the church.) Of course, Frame may be right that the Reformed have not been sufficiently concerned for the unity of Christ's body and therefore are unbiblical. But the bias in the tradition has not been for unity at the expense of truth. The bias has been just the other way around, unity only on the basis of truth.
Prof. Frame and I have different ideas about the way the truth of the gospel is embodied or takes shape in history. Here two images might be helpful. Frame seems to conceive of Christian truth as a hub with different spokes running out from it.
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As much as Frame protests the comparison I think it is more accurate than whatever shock value it might possess.
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As much as Frame protests the comparison I think it is more accurate than whatever shock value it might possess.
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Hart implies that I think we need to learn much from non-Reformed sources; so do I interpret the "so much" in Hart's "he [Frame] thinks he has so much to learn from other traditions.
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Prof. Frame accuses me of an all or nothing approach to the Standards and the Reformed tradition.
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So even if Prof. Frame and I could come up with a list of tolerable exceptions to the Westminster Standards, worship would not be on mine.
Now, just to make our disagreement specific, I do not understand how the worship service that Prof. Frame describes at the end of Worship in Spirit and Truth can meaningfully be described as Presbyterian or Reformed. Here I not only have in mind the use of praise songs that come out of the charismatic tradition, or the lack of an order of the elements that reflects Reformed teaching about what is fitting for a gathering of God with his people. I also object to the atmosphere of such worship which Prof. Frame describes as "an informal service with a friendly, welcoming atmosphere and contemporary styles in language and music" [84]. I think it is incredible that anyone would try to describe Reformed worship as friendly or welcoming considering what our theology professes concerning the holiness, righteousness and transcendence of God, what God expects of anyone who would approach him on his holy hill (Ps 24), and considering what our lord and savior, Jesus Christ, had to do in order to make it possible for us to enter into God's presence. In fact, the RPW was designed precisely to safeguard a God who is zealous for his worship. A jealous God is not one whose presence is welcoming and friendly if it requires the sacrifice of his only begotten son to enter it. A somber, serious, dignified service (no, that doesn't mean incense, vestments, classical music, organs, choirs, or prayer books) is one that I would think more compatible with a God who could have the kind of exchange with Job recorded at the end of that book. But the service Prof. Frame describes struck this reader as one that was void of any sense that God could be offended or that blasphemy might still exist. So from my biased and sectarian perspective, the differences between what Prof. Frame advocates in worship and what I believe the Standards teach is profound, i.e. no where near slight.
Prof. Frame defines a Presbyterian as some one who is a member of good standing in a SOUND Presbyterian Church. Sorry to be so disagreeable, but a church that has friendly and welcoming worship to my mind is not sound. It is not only because it conveys a false sense of security to worshipers or attendees about who God is and their standing before him. It is also because it displeases God by not displaying the reverence and awe that the Bible requires and the Standards articulate. Nor am I sure that I would always agree with Prof. Frame's ideas about a sound church because he has argued that "Shine, Jesus Shine," is a better hymn/chorus than "Of the Father's Love Begotten.
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Perhaps I have overly complicated the differences between Prof. Frame and me by trying to conceive of my ordination vows as a form of presupposition that shapes the way I define the RPW.
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Again, this is one of the bigger matters that separates the Reformed tradition from other Protestants (part of the reason why Frame may balk at the uniqueness of the Reformed tradition of worship is because of his bias in favor of unity.) To depart from the historical RPW, for me, is akin to a professing Unitarian believing Jesus to be the second person of the Trinity.
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Perhaps I have overly complicated the differences between Prof. Frame and me by trying to conceive of my ordination vows as a form of presupposition that shapes the way I define the RPW.
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I also object to the atmosphere of such worship which Prof. Frame describes as "an informal service with a friendly, welcoming atmosphere and contemporary styles in language and music" [84]. I think it is incredible that anyone would try to describe Reformed worship as friendly or welcoming considering what our theology professes concerning the holiness, righteousness and transcendence of God, what God expects of anyone who would approach him on his holy hill (Ps 24), and considering what our lord and savior, Jesus Christ, had to do in order to make it possible for us to enter into God's presence. In fact, the RPW was designed precisely to safeguard a God who is zealous for his worship. A jealous God is not one whose presence is wecolming and friendly if it requires the sacrifice of his only begotten son to enter it.
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But the service Prof. Frame describes struck this reader as one that was void of any sense that God could be offended or that blasphemy might still exist.
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Prof. Frame defines a Presbyterian as some o
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