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2015-06-12T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Joseph Torrillo?

Mr. Joseph Torrillo

Lieutenant

NYC Fire Department

NYC Fire Department

Background Information

Education



New York City Technical College

college degree
structural engineering

degree
structural engineering

Web References (117 Total References)


Cleveland, Ohio-The National Coil ...

www.coilcoating.org [cached]

Cleveland, Ohio-The National Coil Coating Association (NCCA) is planning a multitude of events for its fall technical meeting, scheduled for September 28-30 at The Westin Buckhead in Atlanta, Ga. Highlighting the meeting is a special luncheon presentation by Joe Torrillo, a 25-year lieutenant with the New York City Fire Department, who was on the scene and critically injured during the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

In addition to Torrillo's inspirational speech, attendees will have an opportunity to take a plant tour of Metal Coaters of Georgia and attend several technical presentations including:


Joseph ...

www.insafetyconf.com [cached]

Joseph Torrillo New York City Fire Department (ret.)

A 24 year veteran of the New York City Fire Department, Joe Torrillo was promoted to Lieutenant in 1996 after spending 15 years fighting fires in Manhattan's financial district. While convalescing from a serious injury incurred during a rescue effort at a fire on New Years Eve 1996, Joe Torrillo worked in the office of fire safety education.
In his new position, he would co-create the first state-of-the-art fire safety learning center in the heart of Rockefeller Center, New York City. On the morning of September 11th, 2001, Lt. Joe Torrillo was headed to the new learning center for a press conference when the first plane hit the north tower of the World Trade Center.
Knowing that his Brother firefighters from Engine 10 and Ladder 10 across the street from the towers would be the first responders on the scene, Lt. Torrillo diverted to the World Trade Center complex two minutes before the second plane struck the south tower. While evacuating ambulance crews from the south tower, Lt. Torrillo, who holds a degree in structural engineering, was fully aware and certain that collapse of the towers was likely and imminent, and was buried under the debris of the first collapse.
After being dug out by rescue personnel, Lt. Torrillo was placed on a boat on the Hudson River and taken to a New Jersey hospital where he woke up in the operating room. By night fall, Lt. Torrillo was placed on the official missing list, and assumed to have been missing in action. Luckily, he was identified some time later by hospital personnel, who then notified his frantic family. On February 21st, 2004, Lt. Joe Torrillo was officially retired from the New York City Fire Department from those injuries.


Joe Torrillo speaks to an ...

www.ocregister.com [cached]

Joe Torrillo speaks to an overflow crowd of more than 1,200 at Nixon Library.

...
FDNY Lieutenant Joe Torrillo, at left, who was buried alive after the terrorist attack of the World Trade Center 10 years ago, suffered broken bones and a fractured skull but managed to be rescued.
...
Joe Torrillo of the New York Fire Department, who responded to the World Trade Center after the first attack and was trapped under tons of rubble when the first tower collapsed.
"There were no stars, there was no light down there," he recalled.
In retirement, Torrillo said, his goal has been to "make this the 'Re-United States of America' again."
Torrillo called on Americans to rediscover the unity and passion so many had right after 9/11 for serving their country - locally and nationally - and to be proud to call themselves American.
"It's fine to be tolerant, but that doesn't mean being naïve or stupid," he said. "All that I ask is that every single American never have any guilt for being an American.
"I have to be careful not to sound pompous or arrogant," he said, joking with the crowd about his thick New York accent.


ONTARIO - Joe Torrillo, a ...

www.dailybulletin.com [cached]

ONTARIO - Joe Torrillo, a retired lieutenant in the New York City Fire Department, is never in New York City on the anniversary of the September 11 terrorists attacks.

Instead, for nearly a decade since that September morning, Torrillo has chosen to speak around the world about his experience being trapped underneath the World Trade Center.
On Thursday afternoon he recounted to a small group of Ontario Rotary Club members, the minutes leading up to the towers collapsing tower while he was directing rescue operations and his journey to recovery.
...
Joe Torrillo. Retired Lieutenant, New York City Fire Department, Twin Towers Survivor, chats with members of the Ontario Rotary Club at a weekly lunch meeting in Ontario September 8, 2011. Torrillo joined the Fire Department of New York in 1981, five years after graduating from New York City Technical College. His first firehouse, and his second home for 15 years, was Ten House, across Liberty Street from the World Trade Center. Lt. Torrillo survived being crushed by the collapsing tower while he was directing rescue operations. (Thomas R. Cordova/Staff Photographer) memories of Sept. 11 attacks for the rest of my life," said Torrillo, who retired three years after the attacks.
Torrillo joined the NYFD in 1981, five years after graduating from New York City Technical College.
His first firehouse was across Liberty Street from the World Trade Center.
With a structural engineer background, Torrillo said he was one of the first responders to predict the collapse of the towers.
...
Torrillo said he raced for protection but the air pressure from the collapsing building thrust him into the air.
Rescue crews were able to dig him out of the rubble before the second tower collapsed. Just as responders were taking him away on a boat, headed to a hospital in New Jersey, the second tower collapsed and Torrillo was struck by more debris.
Once that debris had settled, he was taken to the hospital.
With the extent of injuries Torrillo was hospitalized and had to go through rehabilitation.
Surviving the experience made Torrillo realize the opportunity he had to give back to the community, he told those in attendance.
"It's more about sharing the story of the real heroes, the ones who didn't come home that day," he said.
But for years, Torrillo admits he had survivor's guilt. He said he didn't realize it until he sought some medical attention.
"I was angry that I survived," he explained, "like God had cheated me of the glory of marching home with all the other heroes."
The healing process, Torrillo says, has begun and will mostly likely continue the rest of his life.
Listening to Torrillo share his story was retired Ontario police officer Katie Roberts, who visited New York City three days after the attacks.
...
Torrillo will participate in a memorial event at the Nixon Library Sunday morning and also taking part in the Angels/Yankee baseball game pregame ceremonies that afternoon.
He was invited to speak at the Sunday morning memorial service by members of the Freedom's Flame organization.
The foundation, a Rancho Cucamonga nonprofit formed in 2002, designed bicoastal sculptures depicting the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City.
The sculptures, which will include figures of more than 30 civilians and rescue workers, Sam Spagnolo, Rancho Cucamonga councilman and a member of the organization's board of directors, first met Torrillo five years ago.
...
"Joe is a very modest person," he said. "He saved a lot of people that day. I am fortunate and honored to know Joe Torrillo."


ONTARIO - Joe Torrillo, a ...

www.dailybulletin.com [cached]

ONTARIO - Joe Torrillo, a retired lieutenant in the New York City Fire Department, is never in New York City on the anniversary of the September 11 terrorists attacks.

Instead, for nearly a decade since that September morning, Torrillo has chosen to speak around the world about his experience being trapped underneath the World Trade Center.
On Thursday afternoon he recounted to a small group of Ontario Rotary Club members, the minutes leading up to the towers collapsing tower while he was directing rescue operations and his journey to recovery.
...
Joe Torrillo. Retired Lieutenant, New York City Fire Department, Twin Towers Survivor, chats with members of the Ontario Rotary Club at a weekly lunch meeting in Ontario September 8, 2011. Torrillo joined the Fire Department of New York in 1981, five years after graduating from New York City Technical College. His first firehouse, and his second home for 15 years, was Ten House, across Liberty Street from the World Trade Center. Lt. Torrillo survived being crushed by the collapsing tower while he was directing rescue operations. (Thomas R. Cordova/Staff Photographer) memories of Sept. 11 attacks for the rest of my life," said Torrillo, who retired three years after the attacks.
Torrillo joined the NYFD in 1981, five years after graduating from New York City Technical College.
His first firehouse was across Liberty Street from the World Trade Center.
With a structural engineer background, Torrillo said he was one of the first responders to predict the collapse of the towers.
...
Torrillo said he raced for protection but the air pressure from the collapsing building thrust him into the air.
Rescue crews were able to dig him out of the rubble before the second tower collapsed. Just as responders were taking him away on a boat, headed to a hospital in New Jersey, the second tower collapsed and Torrillo was struck by more debris.
Once that debris had settled, he was taken to the hospital.
With the extent of injuries Torrillo was hospitalized and had to go through rehabilitation.
Surviving the experience made Torrillo realize the opportunity he had to give back to the community, he told those in attendance.
"It's more about sharing the story of the real heroes, the ones who didn't come home that day," he said.
But for years, Torrillo admits he had survivor's guilt. He said he didn't realize it until he sought some medical attention.
"I was angry that I survived," he explained, "like God had cheated me of the glory of marching home with all the other heroes."
The healing process, Torrillo says, has begun and will mostly likely continue the rest of his life.
Listening to Torrillo share his story was retired Ontario police officer Katie Roberts, who visited New York City three days after the attacks.
...
Torrillo will participate in a memorial event at the Nixon Library Sunday morning and also taking part in the Angels/Yankee baseball game pregame ceremonies that afternoon.
He was invited to speak at the Sunday morning memorial service by members of the Freedom's Flame organization.
The foundation, a Rancho Cucamonga nonprofit formed in 2002, designed bicoastal sculptures depicting the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City.
The sculptures, which will include figures of more than 30 civilians and rescue workers, Sam Spagnolo, Rancho Cucamonga councilman and a member of the organization's board of directors, first met Torrillo five years ago.
...
"Joe is a very modest person," he said. "He saved a lot of people that day. I am fortunate and honored to know Joe Torrillo."

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