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Wrong Jim Morehead?

Dr. Jim Morehead

HQ Phone: (859) 255-9233

Email: j***@***.com

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Equine Medical Associates LLC

996 Nandino Blvd

Lexington, Kentucky 40511

United States

Company Description

Equine Medical Associates, PSC, was founded in 1991. The company was incorporated in 1996 as a Professional Service Corporation in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Beginning as a solo practice , the volume of clientele and desire to provide quality service i ... more

Find other employees at this company (13)

Background Information

Affiliations

Board Member
Past Member AAEP

Treasurer
Albert Pike Lodge

Member
Thoroughbred Owners

Member
Ethics Committee

Member
AAEP Professional Conduct

Board Member
American Association of Equine Practitioners

Member
Farm Managers' Club

Member
Breeders Association

Founder
PSC

Reproductive and Perinatology Committee
American Association of Equine Practitioners

Member
Purchase Exam Guidelines Task Force

Education

University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine

D.V.M.

University of Missouri

DVM

Sydney University

veterinary degree

University of Missouri

Web References (91 Total References)


Equine Medical Associates, PSC Veterinarians - Equine Medical Associates, PSC

eqmedical.com [cached]

James P. Morehead, DVM

Founding partner of Equine Medical Associates, PSC. Dr. Morehead graduated in 1983...More


"Some of these pharmacies developed sales ...

americashorsedaily.com [cached]

"Some of these pharmacies developed sales forces to go out and 'educate' the veterinary population about their products," says Dr. Jim Morehead, owner of Equine Medical Associates PSC in Lexington, Kentucky.

...
In July 2004, AAEP put together a Drug Compounding Task Force, with Dr. Morehead as the chairman. The task force developed white papers, articles and other educational materials to educate veterinarians and ensure that they had information that was not only legal and in accordance with the FDA but also in the best interest of the horses.
"We saw there was more to do after the first task force," says Dr. Morehead, resident veterinarian at Three Chimney Farms.
...
"If all you're looking at is price, then compounded products are usually cheaper than FDA-approved drugs," Dr. Morehead says.
...
"Veterinarians are charged to do what is in the best interest of their patient," Dr. Morehead continues.
...
"The FDA has a website (www.fda.gov), but it's difficult to navigate," Dr. Morehead says.
...
"Now there is a push to educate the horse-owning public," Dr. Morehead says.


2012 September

americashorsedaily.com [cached]

"Some of these pharmacies developed sales forces to go out and 'educate' the veterinary population about their products," says Dr. Jim Morehead, owner of Equine Medical Associates PSC in Lexington, Kentucky.


James Morehead, ...

www.thehorse.com [cached]

James Morehead, DVM--Treasurer-- Kentucky Thoroughbred practitioner Morehead was sworn in to serve as a member of the Executive Committee, and his three-year term will expire in 2014.

As the owner of Equine Medical Associates, PSC, in Lexington, Morehead brings to the Executive Committee a wealth of expertise in the fields of equine reproduction, ethics, welfare, and veterinary practice management.
After receiving his veterinary degree from the University of Missouri in 1983, Morehead joined Equine Medical Associates, Inc., in Edmond, Okla. In 1986, he relocated to Lexington to work with Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital. He established his own practice in 1991. He has held the position of resident veterinarian for the prestigious Three Chimneys Farm in Midway, Ky. He has served as the 2004 president of the Kentucky Association of Equine Practitioners and is currently a member of the Species Working Group for the American Horse Council.
Since joining the AAEP in 1984, Morehead has served on the AAEP's Reproduction, Infectious Disease and Professional Conduct and Ethics committees. He was elected to serve as the District IV representative on the board of directors from 2006 to 2010. He was a member of the Purchase Exam Guidelines Task Force and chaired the Drug Compounding Task Force. In addition, he has written numerous articles about veterinary ethics for AAEP News.
Morehead believes that veterinarians are responsible for taking the lead on today's equine welfare issues, including horse slaughter and the unwanted horse population. He also will prioritize educating future generations of equine veterinarians during his term on the Executive Committee. He also is interested in helping practitioners work through the hurdles of a depressed economy by using smart practice management tactics.
Morehead has been married for 27 years to wife Michelle, who he met in Columbia, Mo. They have two children, Mallory, 22, and Matthew, 18. Michelle enjoys showing dressage and when he's not practicing, Morehead's passions include hunting and fishing.


According to James P. ...

www.chronofhorse.com [cached]

According to James P. Morehead, DVM, drug manufacturing comes under the authority of the FDA and includes strict requirements related to Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, data demonstrating safety, efficacy and other parameters.

"Under strict interpretation of the law, all compounding is illegal," said Morehead, of Equine Medical Associates in Lexington, Ky., and a member of the American Association of Equine Practitioners Professional Conduct and Ethics Committee.
...
"Therefore the FDA recognizes the need for compounded products in specific situations, in both human and animal medicine, and has published some guidelines for compounding," said Morehead.
...
"The way the FDA regulates compounding is to say it is all illegal, but that they will allow certain things," said Morehead.
...
As explained by Morehead, "A veterinarian should only order the specific amount of product needed for that particular animal, at the time it is needed.
...
"If an approved product is available and appropriate for that specific condition, then we are required to use it," said Morehead.
A case in point is oral altrenogest (known as Regu-Mate, to suppress estrus in mares), which is commercially available; it's an FDA-approved product, to be administered daily.
"Even though a client may consider daily dosing inconvenient, this does not count as a reason to compound a long-acting injectable product," he explained.
Another example: it's not legal to compound phenylbutazone paste "to make it apple flavored or twice the concentration of the commercial paste, because it's already available as an FDA-approved product," said Morehead.
...
If there is a problem with a compounded drug, "the liability falls solely on the prescribing veterinarian," said Morehead.
...
"There are no requirements for stability or potency testing of compounded products," said Morehead.
...
"The use of compounded medications should be on an as-needed basis, keeping on hand only what is needed now, or what you would normally expect to be needed in the short-term care for your patients," said Morehead.
...
"In other words, if you have a compounded product that is to be used on a horse for 30 days, at the conclusion of those 30 days the product has expired," said Morehead.
"The common practice of saving whatever prescription is left over is not a good practice. We know the expiration dates of drugs that have gone through the FDA approval process, but we don't have any idea on the compounded drugs," Morehead added.
...
Morehead believes it is not a good idea, however, for pharmacies to compound a product and keep it on their shelves before sending it out as a prescription.
"FDA does not allow compounding of drugs to make money, or to substitute a compounded product at a cheaper price than an approved drug. Veterinarians cannot use compounded drugs to merely save money over FDA-approved available products," said Morehead.

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