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2011-06-01T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Property Manager

Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Manager

Jasper-Pulaski for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Property Manager

Natural Resources

Pilot

Indiana DNR

Education

degree

Wildlife Management

Humboldt State University

Web References (10 Total References)


"The conditions here are perfect," says ...

www.thebeachcoast.com [cached]

"The conditions here are perfect," says Jim Bergens of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), which owns and manages the site.


Chicago Wilderness Magazine — Jasper Pulaski Fish & Wildlife Area

www.chicagowildernessmag.org [cached]

Such large numbers of cranes may also choose Jasper-Pulaski for its convenient location along an almost direct line between their start and end destinations, according to property manager Jim Bergens of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), which owns and manages the site.


Birdland : Lake Magazine

www.lakemagazine.com [cached]

"Anytime you can see any species of wildlife in really large numbers anymore, it's pretty amazing," says Jim Bergens, manager of Jasper-Pulaski for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

...
"They teach their young to do what they do, and they had done it for a very long time," Bergens says.By the time the IDNR built the first crane observation station at Jasper-Pulaski in 1975, he says, there were about 2,500 cranes stopping here in the fall.
Over the three decades since, as environmental protection efforts have improved, the cranes have recovered abundantly.Today, between 30,000 and 40,000 cranes stop at Jasper-Pulaski each fall and spring.They don't all come at once or stay for the same length of time; normally, the greatest concentration of cranes on the site is about 20,000, Bergens says, and that is around mid-November.
The birds roost in the marshes at night and fly out to feed during the day in private lands all around the area.On their way from one to the other, they stop in the grassy stubblefield known as Goose Pasture.Nobody quite knows why."It's just a behavior they developed themselves," Bergens says."It's their gathering area."
Meantime, in the other gathering area, the one nearby for humans, the prevailing mood is one of rapture.Photographers train their lenses, others their binoculars, people laugh about the cold, but most of what they do is watch and listen.Watch as flocks of one hundred or more drop from the sky to join the crowd, listen as they warble and shriek.Which they do a lot.How they distinguish one call from another is one of those mysteries of the natural world; what it sounds like to the human ear is a gargantuan scrum of high-pitched noise."They're seldom quiet," Bergens says.


The Indiana Law Blog: Environment - Concern about proposed Jasper County CAFO bordering the Jasper/Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area

indianalawblog.com [cached]

DeKryger has looked to the Department of Natural Resources' Jim Bergens, the property manager of the Jasper/Pulaski area who has a degree in Wildlife Management from Humboldt State University in California, to help make sure the cranes are safe.

...
The DNR recently told Bergens not to speak to reporters about the Belstra development. However, that order came after he spoke to the Post-Tribune last week.
Bergens said his opinions on the Belstra matter are based strictly on his background knowledge of the cranes and the Jasper County area. He said he has done no research on what the Belstra farm might do to the area. * * *
Recently, Bergens said, endangered whooping cranes have joined the migration path. Some of them have been found in Jasper County as recently as mid-November. They are part of a "nonessential experimental" project, Bergens said.
"If something were to happen to these birds," Bergens said about the whooping cranes, "they're not essential to the actual wild population."
The Sandhill cranes, Bergens said, began to thrive through various types of protection and resilience against human progress.
"Some species are able to adapt to what people have done to the environment," Bergens said.


Operation Migration - Field Journal - Winter 2007 #1

operationmigration.org [cached]

The partnership thanks Theresa Dailey, Gator Gates, Bryan Woodward, and Rich King (FWS), Jim Bergens (Indiana DNR), Dean Harrigal (South Carolina DNR), Larry Armstrong (Tennessee WRA), Randy Myers (Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries), Anne Lacy (ICF), Bryson McCord, and Dan Kaiser for tracking or monitoring assistance.

...
Thanks to Theresa Dailey, Gator Gates, Bryan Woodward, and Rich King (FWS), Jim Bergens and Brad Feaster (Indiana DNR), Dean Harrigal (South Carolina DNR), Larry Armstrong (Tennessee WRA), Randy Myers (Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries), Marty Folk (Florida FWCC), Kelly Maguire (ICF), Wayne Hall (Wisconsin DNR), Bryson McCord, and Dan Kaiser for tracking or monitoring assistance.

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