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This profile was last updated on 10/16/2013 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Jim Bergens?

Jim Bergens

Property Manager

Jasper-Pulaski Fish

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Web References(38 Total References)


Minnesota Seasons - Sandhill Crane

minnesotaseasons.com [cached]

Jim Bergens, Property Manager at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area, discusses why Sandhill Cranes converge on Jasper-Pulaski FWA each year in the Fall and Spring and how to best view them.


jasper-in.purzuit.com

Jim Bergens, Property Manager at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area, discusses why Sandhill Cranes converge on Jasper-Pulaski FWA each year in the Fall an...


Sports - Post-Tribune (Northwest Indiana)

www.post-trib.com [cached]

On Thursday I talked with Jim Bergens, property manager of Jasper-Pulaski Fish & Wildlife Area."This year we had about 2,000 sandhills stay on the property all winter," Bergens said."Actually, for the past 10 years we have seen an increase in the number of them that fly no further south than J-P.The key is having mild winters and their ability to find food." Bergens said that personnel at Jasper-Pulaski began to notice an increase in the number of sandhills on the property during mid-February. "By the end of February we were hosting about 10,000 sandhills, which was the peak," Bergens said."Last week we saw the vast majority begin to move north." That may explain why we noted a large concentration of northward sandhills last Saturday. I hope you will have the opportunity witness these awesome creatures that stand about 31Ú2 feet tall and possess a wingspan of nearly seven feet.Bergens said that a few are still present on the Jasper- Pulaski property, which is located along U.S. 421 near Medaryville.


Birdland : Lake Magazine

www.lakemagazine.com [cached]

"Anytime you can see any species of wildlife in really large numbers anymore, it's pretty amazing," says Jim Bergens, manager of Jasper-Pulaski for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources."They teach their young to do what they do, and they had done it for a very long time," Bergens says.By the time the IDNR built the first crane observation station at Jasper-Pulaski in 1975, he says, there were about 2,500 cranes stopping here in the fall. Over the three decades since, as environmental protection efforts have improved, the cranes have recovered abundantly.Today, between 30,000 and 40,000 cranes stop at Jasper-Pulaski each fall and spring.They don't all come at once or stay for the same length of time; normally, the greatest concentration of cranes on the site is about 20,000, Bergens says, and that is around mid-November. The birds roost in the marshes at night and fly out to feed during the day in private lands all around the area.On their way from one to the other, they stop in the grassy stubblefield known as Goose Pasture.Nobody quite knows why."It's just a behavior they developed themselves," Bergens says."It's their gathering area." Meantime, in the other gathering area, the one nearby for humans, the prevailing mood is one of rapture.Photographers train their lenses, others their binoculars, people laugh about the cold, but most of what they do is watch and listen.Watch as flocks of one hundred or more drop from the sky to join the crowd, listen as they warble and shriek.Which they do a lot.How they distinguish one call from another is one of those mysteries of the natural world; what it sounds like to the human ear is a gargantuan scrum of high-pitched noise."They're seldom quiet," Bergens says.


Journal and Courier Online - News

www.lafayettejc.com [cached]

"We had 29,000 visitors last month," said Jim Bergens, property manager at Jasper-Pulaski.If snowfall is light, many cranes remain until Christmas.In past years, up to 2,000 have stayed all winter. Even if you're not a bird watcher, it's a rush to see acres and acres of cranes. "They're large birds, and interesting birds," Bergens says.


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