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Wrong Jill Thein-Nissenbaum?

Jill M. Thein-Nissenbaum

Assistant Professor In the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and An Athletic Trainer

University of Wisconsin

HQ Phone:  (608) 263-7600

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University of Wisconsin

1575 Linden Dr.

Madison, Wisconsin,53706

United States

Find other employees at this company (78,240)

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Professor

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Affiliations

American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties Sports Council

Member, Editorial Board


University of Wisconsin/Meriter Hospital

Faculty Member In the Orthopedic Clinical Residency Program


Thera-Band Academy

United States Member


Education

Doctorate of Science Program

Rocky Mountain University


BS

Physical Education

Iowa State University


Master of PT

University of Iowa


Web References(34 Total References)


tc23.04 | training-conditioning.com

training-conditioning.com [cached]

By Dr. Jill Thein-Nissenbaum
Jill Thein-Nissenbaum, DSc, PT, SCS, ATC, is an Assistant Professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and an Athletic Trainer at the University of Wisconsin. She can be reached at: thein@pt.wisc.edu.


www.training-conditioning.com

By Dr. Jill Thein-Nissenbaum
Jill Thein-Nissenbaum, DSc, PT, SCS, ATC, is an Assistant Professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and an Athletic Trainer at the University of Wisconsin. She can be reached at: thein@pt.wisc.edu.


Getting People Back on Their Feet with A Sports Physical Therapy Career

www.spabeautyschools.com [cached]

For Jill M. Thein-Nissenbaum, sports physical therapist and professor of physical therapy at University of Wisconsin (Madison, WI), it's all about getting people back on their feet.
"The difference between sports physical therapy and physical therapy is that usually I'm designing a very detailed rehabilitation program so the injured person can return to a specific activity," she explains. "It's more than rehabbing someone so they can get back to a desk for eight hours -- it's getting them back to their tennis swing or their long jump." A sports physical therapy degree is required to begin a career as a sports physical therapist, and the education requirements have escalated in recent years. "Just about every sports physical therapy program requires a doctorate," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "There are a few programs that still offer master's degrees, but the trend is toward a doctorate and in a few years, that's all we'll see. Schools want to make the degree commensurate with the coursework and the rigorousness of the program, which is usually three years." Coursework for a sports physical therapy degree includes subjects like anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, and even some physics. Clinical classes in sports therapy degree programs will teach how to perform treatments, tests, examination techniques, and various protocols. "There are many similarities between physical therapy and sports physical therapy studies," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "A sports physical therapist has to learn things like how you position your head and neck when you ride a bike or how much range of motion it requires to throw a baseball." Though the majority of sports physical therapy is comprised of treating patients in a clinic or outpatient facility, there are times when travel is necessary. "Many sports physical therapists will go on site to do pre-participation screening for athletes," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "For example, they might go to a high school and screen athletes for things like landing techniques, flexibility, or strength. Then they can design programs to prevent injury from occurring in the first place with specific drills and activities." According to Thein-Nissenbaum, a sports physical therapy career is a lucrative one with starting salaries in the range of $50,000-$55,000 and experienced salaries hitting as high as $90,000. But ultimately, you've got to love helping others to have a successful sports physical therapy career. "You'll spend the majority of your day in patient care," she says.


spa-wellness.spabeautyschools.com

For Jill M. Thein-Nissenbaum, sports physical therapist and professor of physical therapy at University of Wisconsin (Madison, WI), it's all about getting people back on their feet.
"The difference between Sports Physical Therapy and physical therapy is that usually I'm designing a very detailed rehabilitation program so the injured person can return to a specific activity," she explains. "It's more than rehabbing someone so they can get back to a desk for eight hours -- it's getting them back to their tennis swing or their long jump." A sports physical therapy degree is required to begin a career as a sports physical therapist, and the education requirements have escalated in recent years. "Just about every sports physical therapy program requires a doctorate," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "There are a few programs that still offer master's degrees, but the trend is toward a doctorate and in a few years, that's all we'll see. Schools want to make the degree commensurate with the coursework and the rigorousness of the program, which is usually three years." Coursework for a sports physical therapy degree includes subjects like anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, and even some physics. Clinical classes in sports therapy degree programs will teach how to perform treatments, tests, examination techniques, and various protocols. "There are many similarities between physical therapy and sports physical therapy studies," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "A sports physical therapist has to learn things like how you position your head and neck when you ride a bike or how much range of motion it requires to throw a baseball." Though the majority of sports physical therapy is comprised of treating patients in a clinic or outpatient facility, there are times when travel is necessary. "Many sports physical therapists will go on site to do pre-participation screening for athletes," says Thein-Nissenbaum. "For example, they might go to a high school and screen athletes for things like landing techniques, flexibility, or strength. Then they can design programs to prevent injury from occurring in the first place with specific drills and activities." According to Thein-Nissenbaum, a sports physical therapy career is a lucrative one with starting salaries in the range of $50,000-$55,000 and experienced salaries hitting as high as $90,000. But ultimately, you've got to love helping others to have a successful sports physical therapy career. "You'll spend the majority of your day in patient care," she says.


Press Release Articles

www.thera-band.com [cached]

The new members are Timothy F. Tyler, M.S., P.T., A.T.C.; Michael E. Rogers, Ph.D., Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, Ph.D. and Jill Thein, M.P.T., A.T.C.Jill Thein is a full-time faculty associate at the University of Wisconsin in the Madison Physical Therapy Program.Her research and scientific presentations focus on female athletes, female ACL and aquatics; and she has published clinical and rehabilitation articles in several professional journals.TRAC members act as faculty for the Thera-Band Academy, formed in 2000 to guide the Hygenic Corporation on research and product development.Comprehensive summaries of current and completed research projects, continuing education courses and professional and consumer information on fitness and therapy are available at www.Thera-BandAcademy.com.Thera-Band is the world's leading brand of progressive elastic resistance products, which are endorsed by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).Thera-Band products are manufactured and distributed worldwide by The Hygenic Corporation, which is headquartered in Akron.THERA-BAND® and Associated Colors are trademarks of the Hygenic Corporation.


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