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Wrong Jessie Orage?

Jessie Dwight Orage

Gurdjieff Legacy

HQ Phone:  (800) 817-0579

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Gurdjieff Legacy

773 Center Boulevard #58

Fairfax, California,94978

United States

Company Description

Certainly, as Gurdjieff makes clear in Meetings with Remarkable Men, he was raised as a Christian—"I know the rituals of the Greek Church well," he would say many years later, "and there, underlying the form and ceremony, there is real meaning. His first relig... more.

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Web References(1 Total References)


The Gurdjieff Journal—Fourth Way Perspectives—Book Review: Gurdjieff and Orage: Brothers in Elysium

www.gurdjieff-legacy.org [cached]

Now the publication of Gurdjieff and Orage: Brothers in Elysium by Paul Beekman Taylor, a friend of the Orage family and the first to be given access to Orage's and Gurdjieff's letters and the diaries of Orage's wife Jessie, provides important new perspectives.
Jessie Dwight Orage, Gurdjieff, Fourth Way, Ouspensky, Jean Toomer If anything, Jessie was certainly "all or nothing. She meant to have Orage at any cost. Orage wanted her to share his life in the Work, but Jessie had no real interest. However, she understood that the way to Orage was through the teaching. Her ambivalence can be seen when she and Orage went to the docks to see Gurdjieff off on his way back to France. September I come with Orage." And then when the Prophet had sailed from the land of his Abundance or from the land which Orage had made abundant for him, I found that I in truth must go. Orage said so—he did not wish it—he said it had to be done. At the Prieuré, Jessie almost immediately attracted attention. She wore trousers and smoked in public. One day, after Gurdjieff recovered from his car crash, he asked if she had heard from Orage. She had. The next day a notice was posted stipulating that all outgoing letters must be put in a special box and all incoming letters must be signed for and names of correspondents given. "All my Americanism rose," wrote Jessie. Instead of understanding that Gurdjieff was working with her, and her identification with Orage, Jessie began what would be an all or nothing battle with Gurdjieff for Orage's attention. Orage tried to make her see. In response to her first letter to him, a long list of complaints, he wrote: "The theory is quite simple: to change effectively, one's old moulds of habits must be broken up. The next August when Orage and Jessie visited the Prieuré Gurdjieff gave Orage the bulk of the First Series with instructions to put it into publishable English. This comment of Gurdjieff's apparently leads Taylor to consider that Gurdjieff and Orage are equals. That Orage, like Ouspensky, Bennett and Nicoll, or any other of Gurdjieff's students, ever saw themselves as equal in being and knowledge, that is, in understanding, to Gurdjieff is not supported by anything any of the men wrote or said. This is likely a code word for Orage's chief feature. Intellectually, of course, Orage was aware of it. As he wrote in the New Age: "Long after the liability to complete subjection to female illusion is over, men sometimes continue to experience perturbations of their equilibrium in the presence of women. In few instances are these perturbations violent enough to overthrow the mind entirely, but for the moment they undoubtedly do cause the judgment to reel and stagger and the resulting conversation and actions to become distorted. These residual phenomena, however, are to be distinguished from the similar phenomena of adolescence by the fact that they no longer inspire hope but disgust or, at least, annoyance. See William Patrick Patterson, Struggle of the Magicians (Fairfax, CA: Arete, 1996), p. 106. 12. 'Lord,' I say. See Louise Welch, Orage with Gurdjieff in America (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd.,1982), pp. 11578–17.


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