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This profile was last updated on 10/6/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Chief Information Officer

Local Address: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Company Description: Prescient Solutions is a Chicago-based IT outsourcer, using a cloud-based model to provide IT solutions to small, mid-sized, global organizations and government...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Member
    National Cyber Security Task Force
116 Total References
Web References
Prescient Solutions | Chicago IT Services
www.prescientsolutions.com, 13 April 2014 [cached]
CIO Jerry Irvine offers ways to gain back control of cloud sprawl.
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Jerry Irvine gives CIO.com warnings about the IoT - March 25, 2014 Jerry Irvine on WBBM-AM Noon Business Hour with tips to avoid getting hacked - March 19, 2014
Our Team | Prescient Solutions
www.prescientsolutions.com, 13 April 2014 [cached]
Jerry Irvine \ CIO and Partner \
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Jerry Irvine
CIO Irvine provides strategic direction for all clients, overseeing product innovation and implementation of the highest quality of service. His expertise is an indispensable resource for our clients developing IT plans.
Irvine has been deeply involved with the IT industry since 1987. As a result of his early experience, he became an expert in network communications and protocols when others in the industry were just learning how to use their first computer. Armed with this expertise, Irvine entered the consulting world working for companies like Network General and Advantis, performing detailed network analysis, design and troubleshooting. Since then, Irvine has filled MIS and CIO positions at multiple facilities and has managed more than 100 technicians and thousands of devices. He has led multiple project teams, such as the largest Microsoft Directory migration project ever. In 2008, Irvine was selected to join the National Cyber Security Task Force, a joint operation between the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
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Jerry Irvine gives CIO.com warnings about the IoT - March 25, 2014 Jerry Irvine on WBBM-AM Noon Business Hour with tips to avoid getting hacked - March 19, 2014
"I think it's as bad as ...
gcn.com, 11 April 2014 [cached]
"I think it's as bad as everyone is now saying," said Jerry Irvine, chief information officer of Prescient Solutions and a member of the National Cyber Security Task Force."In fact, 60 to 70 percent of the devices that create SSL communication links are likely affected by this bug."
Government agencies that communicate with third-party private or public-sector organizations and who believe their communications have been encrypted and secure, now have to come to grips with the possibility that their communications can potentially be decrypted and shared with non-authorized individuals, he said.
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Users of OpenSSL will have to reinstall their applications to take account of the new patched version, Irvine said, and at the same time they'll have to delete encryption keys and recreate them. However, he added, individual user IDs and passwords will also have to be changed, since simply reinstalling the applications and encryption key doesn't change the IDs and passwords, which may also have been compromised.
It is not the technology that ...
www.lprealestate.ca, 7 May 2014 [cached]
It is not the technology that is the problem; it is how it is used.Many homeowners may be unknowingly trading security for convenience when they install smart gadgets or systems in their homes says cyber security expert Jerry Irvine, chief information officer and partner with Prescient Solutions, an information technology company in suburban Chicago.
Smart technology lets users connect via an internet connection, systems to perform those tasks and almost always those systems can be controlled wirelessly. nfortunately those systems are often insecure, Irvine said, and that vulnerability can open the door, literally and figuratively to people who are looking to steal from you.
Hacking into a smart system can give someone physical access to your home by disabling your security alarm, turning off security cameras and even unlocking the smart lock on your door. What makes these systems even more problematic is that they are often controlled by smartphones, which Irvine called "the most insecure device we have".
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Never make an online payment with a debit card or a direct transfer from your bank account says Jerry Irvine.
The rise of smart technology worries ...
www.gmtoday.com, 5 May 2014 [cached]
The rise of smart technology worries cyber security expert Jerry Irvine, who believes many homeowners are unknowingly trading security for convenience when they install smart gadgets or systems in their homes.
"You should be concerned enough not to do it, or to pay somebody to do it for you correctly," said Irvine, who is chief information officer and a partner with Prescient Solutions, an information technology company in suburban Chicago.
"It's not the technology that's the problem," he said. "It's the way people are using it."
Smart technology lets users control a number of functions remotely from a computer, tablet or smartphone. Typically the users connect to those systems via an Internet site, and almost always the systems can be controlled wirelessly.
Unfortunately, those systems are often insecure, Irvine said. And that vulnerability can open the door - literally or figuratively - to people who are looking to steal from you.
Let's say you have a smart thermostat. It operates via a chip that has no security protection, Irvine said, so a hacker could use it as an entry point to get access to your computer. If that computer isn't adequately protected with antivirus software and its operating system isn't updated regularly, he said, the hacker can get in fairly easily and find information that will let him or her withdraw money from your bank accounts, charge items to your credit cards or otherwise wreak havoc with your finances.
If you think that can't happen, consider this: It appears the hackers who ransacked Target's computer system got in via the heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, said Irvine, who serves on the National Cyber Security Task Force, a body that advises federal decision makers on cyber security policy.
Hacking into a smart system can give someone physical access to your home, too. A thief could disable your security alarm, turn off security cameras and even unlock the smart lock on your door, Irvine said.
What makes these systems even more problematic is they're often controlled by smartphones, which Irvine called "the most insecure device we have. Most users don't even have them set up to require a personal identification number for access, he said.
How can you keep hackers out? If you want to use smart technology, Irvine said, put those controls on their own virtual local area network, or VLAN - a network that's different from the one used for your personal computer and other devices. Configure that VLAN so a person can communicate with the devices on it only through an encrypted virtual private network, or VPN.
That's beyond the capability of the average homeowner, Irvine said, but you can hire a computer technician to do the work for you. It should take about an hour and cost maybe $75, he said.
Have the technician show you how to change the encryption key - the password that decodes the information on the network - after he or she leaves, he advised. That way, the technician won't have access to your network, either.
Irvine said cloud-based home security solutions are an option, but those could still be hacked if you're not careful. He suggested using a unique user name just for that account, something that's hard for a hacker to guess and that's not your email address. You should also use a unique password that's 10 to 15 characters long and includes both capital and lower-case letters and at least one number and one special character - that is, a punctuation mark or symbol such as a percentage sign.
In fact, those user name and password precautions are wise for all your online transactions. Irvine also recommends making online payments only with a low-limit credit card and never allowing a website to save your credit card information.
Never make an online payment with a debit card or a direct transfer from your bank account, he said.
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