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This profile was last updated on 3/2/13  and contains information from public web pages.

Jeremy Weissmiller

Wrong Jeremy Weissmiller?

Member, Group

The 9/11HelpAmerica Foundation
14147 Hawthorne Blvd.
Hawthorne, California 90250
United States

 
Background

Employment History

  • Marine Corps
Web References
"I think my PTSD goes as ...
www.911helpamerica.com, 1 Mar 2009 [cached]
"I think my PTSD goes as far back as East Timor," Jeremy said in one of our many conversations. Jeremy Weissmiller, who recently joined our group, joined the Marine Corps in March of 1998, something he was planning to do for life. planning meeting His first deployment was to Saudi Arabia to help with their military training. While serving in Saudi Arabia, a brutal civil war was raging between Timor and East Timor. The Marines were sent there to protect the America Embassy, one of their many jobs around the world. Jeremy told us what he witnessed there was even more brutal than what he later saw in Iraq or Afghanistan. There was not much heavy weaponry; consequently, many of casualties were sustained in hand to hand combat, up close and personal. The savagery was everywhere and was often inflicted with a cruel and prolonged agony.
When 9-11 happened, he immediately knew we were going to war, and like any good Warrior, he was ready to put all his training to use and fight the righteous fight. His unit, a part of 1st Battalion 1st Marines, was one of the first deployed to Afghanistan, in October 2001. On Christmas day 2001, Jeremy received his first injury. He was unloading ammo from a helicopter when the cargo net broke and a 500 pound crate fell on him. He suffered several broken vertebrae, bladder damage and a host of other injuries as result of that accident. On February 2002 he was medi-vac'ed back to the states where he worked hard to rehabilitate and restore his body and become fit enough to return to the fight. Almost a year to the day after his injury, he was medically released and redeployed, this time to Kuwait. Jeremy in Iraq On March 17 2003 the FSSG (Force Service Support Group) entered Iraq and with them was Marine Weapons and Battle Instructor Sgt Jeremy Weissmiller. Three weeks in to Iraq he was injured by an IED explosion. When he woke up, he was stateside at Balboa Medical Center. The combination of those two injuries has left Jeremy severely disabled. He is what they refer to as an incomplete paraplegic. He has been rated 100% disabled by the VA. He has endured four back surgeries and countless hours of rehabilitation. He can't walk but a few feet and then only on good days; he is wheelchair bound most of the time. He suffers from sleep apnea, a disorder that requires a machine (CPAP) to force him to breathe in case he stops breathing while sleeping, and most damaging of all are PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) and TBI (traumatic brain injury). That's a very short version of Jeremy's story of service and sacrifice for our country.
...
They do miracles from the battlefield to the local hospital, but once in a while, some of our guys fall through the cracks and Jeremy was one of them.
...
When Jeremy first contacted us and told us his situation and what he was going through, my first thought was "That's not Right.
...
There is a network of volunteers that gladly and willingly give of their time and money to help guys like Jeremy when their situations are brought into the spot light. Jeremy was just one of those cases- a Marine who served his country over and above the call of duty and yet, at the end of the day, didn't have the gas money to visit the VA hospital that had the expertise to best treat his injuries. We sent out an email simply telling his story. The following day he began to receive calls. Shortly thereafter he received additional travel allowance funds. He received several calls from other groups as well as some higher ups in the VA who took an interest in the case and are now helping with application process for the TSGLI insurance money. We're keeping our fingers crossed because he has been told that it looks good and he may qualify. If so, that will be an earned benefit, albeit very late in coming, but a Godsend to a guy just trying to get gas money to make it to the VA hospital of choice more often. Many people have helped Jeremy before and after we got involved. It would be presumptuous on our part to think that all good things happened because of us; that is simply not true, rather it is a team effort. But for this foundation and its volunteers, the process has been an education. The first lesson is how easy it is for a person suffering from TBI and PTSD to fall through the cracks. The second lesson is that the VA is now aware of this and will act quickly, not necessarily to everyone's satisfaction, but more quickly, if made aware of cases such as Jeremy's.
...
Below is Jeremy, Manny Rivas- blind, Sgt Major Jesse Acosta
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We are all very grateful to that core of wonderful volunteers that go to bat for guys like Jeremy every day and say "That's not Right!
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, at ...
www.redlandsdailyfacts.com, 26 April 2011 [cached]
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, at left, uses it to treat pain he suffers from a shattered back he suffered while serving in Afghanistan. (Jesse B. Gill/Staff)
...
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, of Crestline said he was medically retired from the Marine Corps after a 500-pound pallet of ammunition fell on him and shattered his back when he was serving in Afghanistan in 2001.
"I was diagnosed as an incomplete paraplegic," he said. "I had lost almost all use of my legs."
He said he has two 6-inch metal rods holding his spine together.
Weissmiller, 33, wears his military background like a badge of honor. His appearance - a large build with a cleanly shaven head - has gotten him turned away from medical marijuana dispensaries and collectives.
"They say I look too much like a cop," he said.
Two years ago, Weissmiller said, he looked like an out-of- shape man who couldn't get out of his wheelchair. That's because that's exactly what he was.
Given a litany of heavy medication - including Fentanyl, Percocet and Valium - Weissmiller said his liver swelled so much that doctors told him he needed to stop drinking.
"But I don't drink," he said. "It was because of the medication."
Weissmiller turned to alternative forms of treatment.
"I learned that these medications were keeping me from rehabilitating," he said. "I was dizzy all the time and it was messing up my liver and it was also messing up my legs some."
He said he tried acupuncture and massage therapy to ease the pain caused by his accident.
And then he tried the thing he had only tried one other time - marijuana.
The effects were dramatic. He said the swelling in his liver subsided as he weaned himself off his medications. The marijuana eased his pain enough to where he began spending more and more time out of his wheelchair, he said.
Now, Weissmiller said, he doesn't spend any time in his wheelchair. And he's lost 80 pounds.
"I'm active and doing things again now," he said. "And I'm out of the (wheelchair)."
...
Weissmiller says marijuana isn't the perfect cure-all. It has its drawbacks, as do other forms of medications, he said. But it has worked for him, and he's no longer on any heavy medication except for the marijuana.
"I don't advocate cannabis for everybody," Weissmiller said.
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, at ...
www.redlandsdailyfacts.com, 26 April 2011 [cached]
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, at left, uses it to treat pain he suffers from a broken back. (JESSE B. GILL/Staff)
...
Jeremy Weissmiller, 33, of Crestline said he was medically retired from the Marine Corps after a 500-pound pallet of ammunition fell on him and shattered his back when he was serving in Afghanistan in 2001.
"I was diagnosed as an incomplete paraplegic," he said. "I had lost almost all use of my legs."
He said he has two 6-inch metal rods holding his spine together.
Weissmiller, 33, wears his military background like a badge of honor. His appearance - a large build with a cleanly shaven head - has gotten him turned away from medical marijuana dispensaries and collectives.
"They say I look too much like a cop," he said.
Two years ago, Weissmiller said, he looked like an out-of- shape man who couldn't get out of his wheelchair. That's because that's exactly what he was.
Given a litany of heavy medication - including Fentanyl, Percocet and Valium - Weissmiller said his liver swelled so much that doctors told him he needed to stop drinking.
"But I don't drink," he said. "It was because of the medication."
Weissmiller turned to alternative forms of treatment.
"I learned that these medications were keeping me from rehabilitating," he said. "I was dizzy all the time and it was messing up my liver and it was also messing up my legs some."
He said he tried acupuncture and massage therapy to ease the pain caused by his accident.
And then he tried the thing he had only tried one other time - marijuana.
The effects were dramatic. He said the swelling in his liver subsided as he weaned himself off his medications. The marijuana eased his pain enough to where he began spending more and more time out of his wheelchair, he said.
Now, Weissmiller said, he doesn't spend any time in his wheelchair. And he's lost 80 pounds.
"I'm active and doing things again now," he said. "And I'm out of the (wheelchair)."
Rebuilding Together: News & Events: Sears Holiday Fundraiser to Grant Wishes for Military Families - Joint effort with Rebuilding Together to improve lives of military families at home
www.rebuildingtogether.org, 3 Dec 2008 [cached]
The 2008 Fall Campaign kicked off by honoring Jeremy Weissmiller of Crestline, CA. Jeremy, his wife Melissa and two daughters, ages 11 and eight are in need of home modifications to better allow use of Jeremy's motorized wheelchair.
While serving for the Marines, Jeremy injured his back in Afghanistan. He was then deployed to Kuwait and Iraq, further worsening the injury which eventually led to Jeremy's medical discharge. Now, a partial paraplegic, Jeremy has limited use of his legs. Doctors have told Jeremy that over the coming years, he could become fully paraplegic and lose this mobility altogether. Adding to Jeremy and his family's distressing circumstances is his severe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
The 2008 Fall Campaign kicked off ...
www.veteransadvantage.com, 31 Jan 2009 [cached]
The 2008 Fall Campaign kicked off by honoring Jeremy Weissmiller of Crestline, CA.Jeremy, his wife Melissa and two daughters, ages 11 and eight are in need of home modifications to better allow use of Jeremy's motorized wheelchair.
While serving for the Marines, Jeremy injured his back in Afghanistan.He was then deployed to Kuwait and Iraq, further worsening the injury which eventually led to Jeremy's medical discharge.Now, a partial paraplegic, Jeremy has limited use of his legs.Doctors have told Jeremy that over the coming years, he could become fully paraplegic and lose this mobility altogether.Adding to Jeremy and his family's distressing circumstances is his severe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
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