Last Update

2016-04-18T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Jeffrey Varner?

Dr. Jeffrey D. Varner

Director, Professional Master's of Science Program

Purdue University

HQ Phone: (765) 494-4600

Email: j***@***.edu

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Purdue University

550 Stadium Mall Dr.Civil Engineering Building, Room G216B

West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

United States

Company Description

The Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S. Services provided by this office support the economic development initiatives of Purdue U ... more

Find other employees at this company (32,814)

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Professor

Cornell University

Research Scientist

Genencor International , Inc.

Education

Math and Chemistry

Purdue University

Ph D.

Chemical Engineering

Web References (13 Total References)


Cho will use different models to ...

bionews-tx.com [cached]

Cho will use different models to determine whether the blood-brain-barrier has been damaged, then forward his research findings to Jeff Varner, director of the Professional Master's of Science Program at Purdue, for analysis to predict activation of possible molecular signaling pathways.


Dr. Varner spent ...

cornellsun.com [cached]

Dr. Varner spent his undergraduate and graduate years at Purdue University, first as an undergraduate in Math and Chemistry and then later as a Masters and Ph D. in Chemical Engineering. Today, he teaches graduate and undergraduate classes specializing in Biomolecular Engineering in chemical engineering at Cornell. Varner described his research focus as "understanding the molecular basis of cancers. Generally speaking, what we're trying to do is understand how complex molecular programs that are involved in cells making decisions - like whether or not to grow, die, or simply do nothing [and] fail."

"We study how networks break and how to break them. Although he hopes to develop therapeutic treatments for cancer, Varner is also investigating other molecular signaling networks like blood clotting and the biochemical basis of pain. These two networks are of particular interest to the Department of Defense, which partially funds some of Jeffrey Varner's research, in helping soldiers survive otherwise fatal wounds, such as extremity injuries. It also has civilian applications for afflictions like hemophilia and chronic pain.
Few people have asked how cancer is like a broken watch, or a failed mars mission, but these different problems have far more in common than most people would think. Varner likened complex systems to jumbo jets: "If a screw fails in your seat cushion, the airplane can still take off. However, if a screw fails in your engine and the engine falls off, you're in serious trouble. At both points we're dealing with the same faulty screws, but the context of the failure is different. The screw in the engine is an example of a fragile point - one whose failure compromises the whole system - while the screws in the seat cushion are considered robust since the plane functions fine without them.
In a similar manner, Varner explained, many of a cell's governing biochemical systems consist of robust points and fragile points.
...
Varner's team focuses on specialized proteins, called monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered to only target certain types of cancerous cells.
Varner's problem solving strategy is innovative. To identify and test new models, he looks at the relevant literature to find a molecular network of interest.
...
"The same sort of systems are used over and over," Varner said.


Dr. Varner spent ...

www.cornellsun.com [cached]

Dr. Varner spent his undergraduate and graduate years at Purdue University, first as an undergraduate in Math and Chemistry and then later as a Masters and Ph D. in Chemical Engineering. Today, he teaches graduate and undergraduate classes specializing in Biomolecular Engineering in chemical engineering at Cornell. Varner described his research focus as "understanding the molecular basis of cancers. Generally speaking, what we're trying to do is understand how complex molecular programs that are involved in cells making decisions - like whether or not to grow, die, or simply do nothing [and] fail."

"We study how networks break and how to break them. Although he hopes to develop therapeutic treatments for cancer, Varner is also investigating other molecular signaling networks like blood clotting and the biochemical basis of pain. These two networks are of particular interest to the Department of Defense, which partially funds some of Jeffrey Varner's research, in helping soldiers survive otherwise fatal wounds, such as extremity injuries. It also has civilian applications for afflictions like hemophilia and chronic pain.
Few people have asked how cancer is like a broken watch, or a failed mars mission, but these different problems have far more in common than most people would think. Varner likened complex systems to jumbo jets: "If a screw fails in your seat cushion, the airplane can still take off. However, if a screw fails in your engine and the engine falls off, you're in serious trouble. At both points we're dealing with the same faulty screws, but the context of the failure is different. The screw in the engine is an example of a fragile point - one whose failure compromises the whole system - while the screws in the seat cushion are considered robust since the plane functions fine without them.
In a similar manner, Varner explained, many of a cell's governing biochemical systems consist of robust points and fragile points.
...
Varner's team focuses on specialized proteins, called monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered to only target certain types of cancerous cells.
Varner's problem solving strategy is innovative. To identify and test new models, he looks at the relevant literature to find a molecular network of interest.
...
"The same sort of systems are used over and over," Varner said.


Dr. Varner spent ...

www.cornellsun.com [cached]

Dr. Varner spent his undergraduate and graduate years at Purdue University, first as an undergraduate in Math and Chemistry and then later as a Masters and Ph D. in Chemical Engineering. Today, he teaches graduate and undergraduate classes specializing in Biomolecular Engineering in chemical engineering at Cornell. Varner described his research focus as "understanding the molecular basis of cancers. Generally speaking, what we're trying to do is understand how complex molecular programs that are involved in cells making decisions - like whether or not to grow, die, or simply do nothing [and] fail."

"We study how networks break and how to break them. Although he hopes to develop therapeutic treatments for cancer, Varner is also investigating other molecular signaling networks like blood clotting and the biochemical basis of pain. These two networks are of particular interest to the Department of Defense, which partially funds some of Jeffrey Varner's research, in helping soldiers survive otherwise fatal wounds, such as extremity injuries. It also has civilian applications for afflictions like hemophilia and chronic pain.
Few people have asked how cancer is like a broken watch, or a failed mars mission, but these different problems have far more in common than most people would think. Varner likened complex systems to jumbo jets: "If a screw fails in your seat cushion, the airplane can still take off. However, if a screw fails in your engine and the engine falls off, you're in serious trouble. At both points we're dealing with the same faulty screws, but the context of the failure is different. The screw in the engine is an example of a fragile point - one whose failure compromises the whole system - while the screws in the seat cushion are considered robust since the plane functions fine without them.
In a similar manner, Varner explained, many of a cell's governing biochemical systems consist of robust points and fragile points.
...
Varner's team focuses on specialized proteins, called monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered to only target certain types of cancerous cells.
Varner's problem solving strategy is innovative. To identify and test new models, he looks at the relevant literature to find a molecular network of interest.
...
"The same sort of systems are used over and over," Varner said.


Other co-authors are Erin Stephens, a ...

www.eurekalert.org [cached]

Other co-authors are Erin Stephens, a graduate student in the field of biochemistry, molecular and cell biology; and Jeffrey Varner, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Varner

Bruce Varner
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company

Louis Varner
Memorial Hospital

Angela Varner
Ramada

Bridgitte Varner
Silver Sheet Enterprises Inc

Sarah Varner
Talking Books

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory