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This profile was last updated on 10/7/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Prof. Jeffrey C. Grossman

Wrong Prof. Jeffrey C. Grossman?

Department of Materials Science a...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
United States

Company Description: The mission of MIT is to advance knowledge and educate students in science, technology, and other areas of scholarship that will best serve the nation and the world...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

176 Total References
Web References
CECAM - Workshop details
www.cecam.org, 22 Mar 2014 [cached]
Jeffrey C. Grossman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. "New Materials for Solar Capture and Storage"
Member-at-Large: Jeffrey ...
units.aps.org, 24 Oct 2013 [cached]
Member-at-Large: Jeffrey Grossman ( 03/11 - 02/14) Massachusetts Inst of Tech-MIT
CECAM - Workshop details
www.cecam.org, 28 May 2013 [cached]
Jeffrey C. Grossman Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Atom-thick photovoltaic sheets could pack hundreds of times more power per weight than conventional solar cells.
www.understandingnano.com, 14 Sept 2013 [cached]
Jeffrey Grossman, the Carl Richard Soderberg Associate Professor of Power Engineering at MIT, says the new approach "pushes towards the ultimate power conversion possible from a material" for solar power. Grossman is the senior author of a new paper describing this approach, published in the journal Nano Letters.
Although scientists have devoted considerable attention in recent years to the potential of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, Grossman says, there has been little study of their potential for solar applications. It turns out, he says, "they're not only OK, but it's amazing how well they do."
The MIT team found that an effective solar cell could be made from a stack of two one-molecule-thick materials: Graphene (a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms, shown at bottom in blue) and molybdenum disulfide (above, with molybdenum atoms shown in red and sulfur in yellow). The two sheets together are thousands of times thinner than conventional silicon solar cells. Graphic: Jeffrey Grossman and Marco Bernardi
...
Using two layers of such atom-thick materials, Grossman says, his team has predicted solar cells with 1 to 2 percent efficiency in converting sunlight to electricity, That's low compared to the 15 to 20 percent efficiency of standard silicon solar cells, he says, but it's achieved using material that is thousands of times thinner and lighter than tissue paper.
...
At about one nanometer (billionth of a meter) in thickness, "It's 20 to 50 times thinner than the thinnest solar cell that can be made today," Grossman adds.
...
The MIT team's work so far to demonstrate the potential of atom-thick materials for solar generation is "just the start," Grossman says. For one thing, molybdenum disulfide and molybdenum diselenide, the materials used in this work, are just two of many 2-D materials whose potential could be studied, to say nothing of different combinations of materials sandwiched together. "There's a whole zoo of these materials that can be explored," Grossman says. "My hope is that this work sets the stage for people to think about these materials in a new way."
While no large-scale methods of producing molybdenum disulfide and molybdenum diselenide exist at this point, this is an active area of research. Manufacturability is "an essential question," Grossman says, "but I think it's a solvable problem."
An additional advantage of such materials is their long-term stability, even in open air; other solar-cell materials must be protected under heavy and expensive layers of glass. "It's essentially stable in air, under ultraviolet light, and in moisture," Grossman says. "It's very robust."
The work so far has been based on computer modeling of the materials, Grossman says, adding that his group is now trying to produce such devices. "I think this is the tip of the iceberg in terms of utilizing 2-D materials for clean energy" he says.
A companion paper, written by three ...
www.compoundsemiconductor.net, 28 May 2014 [cached]
A companion paper, written by three members of the same team along with MIT's Jeffrey Grossman, the Carl Richard Soderberg Associate Professor of Power Engineering, and three others, appears this month in the journal ACS Nano, explaining in greater detail the science behind the strategy employed to reach this efficiency breakthrough.
The new work represents a turnaround for Bawendi, who had spent much of his career working with quantum dots. "I was somewhat of a sceptic four years ago," he says. But his team's research since then has clearly demonstrated quantum dots' potential in solar cells, he adds.
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