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This profile was last updated on 8/23/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Jeffrey B. Driban

Wrong Dr. Jeffrey B. Driban?

Special and Scientific Staff

Tufts Medical Center
800 Washington Street #231
Boston , Massachusetts 02111
United States

Company Description: Tufts Medical Center is an exceptional, not-for-profit, 415-bed academic medical center that is home to both a full-service hospital for adults and Floating...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • PhD
24 Total References
Web References
Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, ATC, ...
www.sportsmedres.org, 25 Oct 2013 [cached]
Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, ATC, CSCS
by Stephen Nicholas, M.D., director, ...
www.dmcsurgeryhospital.org, 5 Nov 2011 [cached]
by Stephen Nicholas, M.D., director, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Jeffrey B. Driban, Ph.D., assistant professor, rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston; Elena Losina, Ph.D., co-director, Orthopedics and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; Nov. 5, 2011, presentation, American College of Rheumatology, annual meeting, Chicago
...
And certain sports are riskier than others, said another researcher, Dr. Jeffrey Driban, an assistant professor of rheumatology at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. He reviewed studies that looked at a link between sports participation and knee OA. He focused on 16 studies, and then honed in on 10 that looked at athletes and nonathletes.
While there were not great differences later in the amount of knee OA for former sports players and nonathletes, he did find a risk linked with the type of sport and level of participation.
Soccer players, whether elite level or not, had a greater risk of knee OA, he found. So did elite long-distance runners, competitive weight lifters and wrestlers.
The increased risk of arthritis in these participants varied from about threefold to more than sixfold compared to nonathletes, he said.
...
Driban suggested that those who want to minimize the risk of knee OA later should consider sports with a lower knee injury risk, such as swimming and cycling.
...
SOURCES: Stephen Nicholas, M.D., director, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Jeffrey B. Driban, Ph.D., assistant professor, rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston; Elena Losina, Ph.D., co-director, Orthopedics and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; Nov. 5, 2011, presentation, American College of Rheumatology, annual meeting, Chicago
And certain sports are riskier than ...
www.signsofarthritis.com, 5 Nov 2011 [cached]
And certain sports are riskier than others, said another researcher, Dr. Jeffrey Driban, an assistant professor of rheumatology at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. He reviewed studies that looked at a link between sports participation and knee OA. He focused on 16 studies, and then honed in on 10 that looked at athletes and nonathletes.
While there were not great differences later in the amount of knee OA for former sports players and nonathletes, he did find a risk linked with the type of sport and level of participation.
Soccer players, whether elite level or not, had a greater risk of knee OA, he found. So did elite long-distance runners, competitive weight lifters and wrestlers.
The increased risk of arthritis in these participants varied from about threefold to more than sixfold compared to nonathletes, he said.
...
Driban suggested that those who want to minimize the risk of knee OA later should consider sports with a lower knee injury risk, such as swimming and cycling.
...
SOURCES: Stephen Nicholas, M.D., director, Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Jeffrey B. Driban, Ph.D., assistant professor, rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston; Elena Losina, Ph.D., co-director, Orthopedics and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston; Nov. 5, 2011, presentation, American College of Rheumatology, annual meeting, Chicago
Eastern Athletic Trainers' Association
www.goeata.org, 21 Mar 2012 [cached]
Jeffrey Driban, PhD, ATC, CSCS Tufts Medical Center 617-636-7449 jdriban@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
"We were concerned that patients were ...
www.arthritistoday.org [cached]
"We were concerned that patients were taking multiple nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ... [risking] increasing side effects like gastrointestinal distress," says Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, assistant professor of rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center.
Driban was also concerned that patients were seeking their own ways of managing symptoms because they didn't feel prescribed medications were adequate.  In some cases, patients were taking friends' medications. Other patients stopped taking prescribed medications as soon as the first prescription ran out.
"We worried that patients were increasing risks of side effects and increasing costs by taking multiple medications," says Driban.
...
Talk to your doctor more, not less."If you feel like your medication isn't working after a few days," says Driban, "rather than stopping, tell your physician and ask for [alternatives]."
...
In some cases you can take a proton pump inhibitor (a prescription antacid) with an NSAID, or use a different pain reliever to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, says Driban.
...
"We were concerned that patients were taking multiple nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ... [risking] increasing side effects like gastrointestinal distress," says Jeffrey B. Driban, PhD, assistant professor of rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center.
Driban was also concerned that patients were seeking their own ways of managing symptoms because they didn't feel prescribed medications were adequate.  In some cases, patients were taking friends' medications. Other patients stopped taking prescribed medications as soon as the first prescription ran out.
"We worried that patients were increasing risks of side effects and increasing costs by taking multiple medications," says Driban.
...
Talk to your doctor more, not less."If you feel like your medication isn't working after a few days," says Driban, "rather than stopping, tell your physician and ask for [alternatives]."
...
In some cases you can take a proton pump inhibitor (a prescription antacid) with an NSAID, or use a different pain reliever to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, says Driban.
...
Don't let money rule treatment.Again, ask for your doctor's help in finding a cheaper solution, says Driban.
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