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This profile was last updated on 9/19/06  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Part of the Creative Writing Group
    American Association of University Women
  • Part of the Creative Writing Group
    American Association of University Women. Hawkes
  • Part of the Creative Writing Group
    Marco Island Parks

Education

  • bachelor's degree , English
Web References
Her life experiences, put into words | marconews.com | Marco Eagle | Marco Island, FL
www.marcoeagle.com, 19 Sept 2006 [cached]
The vocabulary and stories of patients from Jean Hawkes' days as a doctor unintentionally slip in when she writes.
Some of her stories are crafted to meet assignments by a creative writing group of the American Association of University Women.
She has been asked to write a complete story in 50 words, and a story using words with only one syllable.
Hawkes, of Marco Island, joined the group to make new friends and because she'd written a lot during college.
"I'm really just in it for the ride because I don't have an imagination," Hawkes said."I have an ability to describe and turn a phrase and embroider some on the facts, but I don't ever think of something original."
Hawkes said she bases her stories on her life experiences.She earned a bachelor's degree in English with the thought of becoming a journalist.But she went to medical school because she wouldn't have to do anything right away.
She said by the time she was 30, she hadn't done anything profitable.
Jean Hawkes, of Marco Island, is part of the creative writing group with the American Association of University Women. Hawkes, 92, practiced internal medicine for 40 years and she said most of her stories are based on life experiences.
...
Jean Hawkes, of Marco Island, is part of the creative writing group with the American Association of University Women.Hawkes, 92, practiced internal medicine for 40 years and she said most of her stories are based on life experiences.
Now that she's retired, she has time to write.She has won twice with stories submitted to the state contest sponsored by the AAUW.
In 2001-02, her winning story was about her experience teaching English as a second language.She was tutoring a boy from Guatemala.He then brought his brother, who didn't speak any English.
Hawkes was trying to teach the non-English- speaking brother colors.She tried using the example of a rainbow, but it didn't seem to work.She asked the older brother to explain a rainbow.He began by gesturing wildly and taking deep breathes.
When Hawkes asked him what he was explaining, he said, "Rambo."
In 2002-03, her winning story was about multiple discussions she'd had over the phone with a husband about the condition of his wife.She said he was inarticulate and they weren't making progress, so she invited him to her office.
At the end of the conversation, he said he wanted to tell her something.She said she leaned back and smiled, awaiting a compliment.
The husband told her she sounded younger on the phone than she looked.
She said that put her in her place.
Hawkes also has written a story about one of her patients who was trying to lose weight.
She said after three months, the woman had a lot of excuses for not losing any weight.And when Hawkes went to weigh her, the woman took off her earrings, shoes and dropped the tissue in her hand.
When Hawkes told her she hadn't lost an ounce, the woman replied that she weighed herself at home without her teeth.
Hawkes said she enjoys writing even though it's not prose.She admitted she's not much of a self-disciplinarian.But, she said if she were to write a book, it would probably be her memoirs, because that wouldn't require any imagination.
"I can't imagine who would read them if I managed to get them down," she said.
Her memoirs might include her involvement with Project Hope, an organization that began about 1960.She said a ship equipped like a hospital would travel to an underprivileged area and stay for a year.The local doctors would receive training and various ailments would be treated.She said there was a standard staff of nurses, technicians and pharmacists, and that the doctors came in for two months at a time.
She practiced internal medicine for 40 years.
"I can't imagine now doing anything else," Hawkes said.
Hawkes was in Columbia for two months in 1971, and in Tunisia in 1973.
"At the end of the time they had supposedly made a dent in the general health," she said.
Now her experiences appear in her writings.She said the creative writing group is for people who want to write â€" or think they can write â€" and need someone to listen.She has been a part of the group for seven years.
At 92, she writes because she likes it and it's a lot of fun.She said there's an acronym known as FWSOW.It stands for Fascination With Sound of Own Words.
"The more I read over my writings, the more interesting they get," she said.
Her life experiences, put into words | naplesnews.com | Naples Daily News
www.naplesnews.com, 19 Sept 2006 [cached]
The vocabulary and stories of patients from Jean Hawkes' days as a doctor unintentionally slip in when she writes.
...
Hawkes, of Marco Island, joined the group to make new friends and because she'd written a lot during college.
"I'm really just in it for the ride because I don't have an imagination," Hawkes said."I have an ability to describe and turn a phrase and embroider some on the facts, but I don't ever think of something original."
Hawkes said she bases her stories on her life experiences.She earned a bachelor's degree in English with the thought of becoming a journalist.But she went to medical school because she wouldn't have to do anything right away.
She said by the time she was 30, she hadn't done anything profitable.
Jean Hawkes, of Marco Island, is part of the creative writing group with the American Association of University Women. Hawkes, 92, practiced internal medicine for 40 years and she said most of her stories are based on life experiences.
...
Jean Hawkes, of Marco Island, is part of the creative writing group with the American Association of University Women.Hawkes, 92, practiced internal medicine for 40 years and she said most of her stories are based on life experiences.
Now that she's retired, she has time to write.She has won twice with stories submitted to the state contest sponsored by the AAUW.
In 2001-02, her winning story was about her experience teaching English as a second language.She was tutoring a boy from Guatemala.He then brought his brother, who didn't speak any English.
Hawkes was trying to teach the non-English- speaking brother colors.She tried using the example of a rainbow, but it didn't seem to work.She asked the older brother to explain a rainbow.He began by gesturing wildly and taking deep breathes.
When Hawkes asked him what he was explaining, he said, "Rambo."
In 2002-03, her winning story was about multiple discussions she'd had over the phone with a husband about the condition of his wife.She said he was inarticulate and they weren't making progress, so she invited him to her office.
At the end of the conversation, he said he wanted to tell her something.She said she leaned back and smiled, awaiting a compliment.
The husband told her she sounded younger on the phone than she looked.
She said that put her in her place.
Hawkes also has written a story about one of her patients who was trying to lose weight.
She said after three months, the woman had a lot of excuses for not losing any weight.And when Hawkes went to weigh her, the woman took off her earrings, shoes and dropped the tissue in her hand.
When Hawkes told her she hadn't lost an ounce, the woman replied that she weighed herself at home without her teeth.
Hawkes said she enjoys writing even though it's not prose.She admitted she's not much of a self-disciplinarian.But, she said if she were to write a book, it would probably be her memoirs, because that wouldn't require any imagination.
"I can't imagine who would read them if I managed to get them down," she said.
Her memoirs might include her involvement with Project Hope, an organization that began about 1960.She said a ship equipped like a hospital would travel to an underprivileged area and stay for a year.The local doctors would receive training and various ailments would be treated.She said there was a standard staff of nurses, technicians and pharmacists, and that the doctors came in for two months at a time.
She practiced internal medicine for 40 years.
"I can't imagine now doing anything else," Hawkes said.
Hawkes was in Columbia for two months in 1971, and in Tunisia in 1973.
"At the end of the time they had supposedly made a dent in the general health," she said.
Now her experiences appear in her writings.She said the creative writing group is for people who want to write â€" or think they can write â€" and need someone to listen.She has been a part of the group for seven years.
At 92, she writes because she likes it and it's a lot of fun.She said there's an acronym known as FWSOW.It stands for Fascination With Sound of Own Words.
"The more I read over my writings, the more interesting they get," she said.
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