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This profile was last updated on 3/21/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Jay Polite Laber

Wrong Jay Polite Laber?

Tribal Member and Artist

Phone: (406) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: j***@***.com
Blackfeet Country
... With Support From The 108 All Chiefs Square
Browning, Montana 59417
United States

Company Description: The Blackfeet Women's Business Center (BWBC) provides assistance and/or training in finance, management, marketing, procurement and the Internet to all socially and...   more
Background

Employment History

12 Total References
Web References
Welcome to Blackfeet Country ~Browning Montana~ Glacier Park
www.blackfeetcountry.com, 21 Mar 2014 [cached]
From scraps of rusted automobiles, bits of barbed wire and the stones of an old mission school, Blackfeet tribal member and artist Jay Laber has created a statue of two Native American warriors astride their horses at each of the four entrances to the Blackfeet Reservation.
Jay Laber: Revived Rez Wrecks
www.holtermuseum.org, 31 Oct 2013 [cached]
Jay Laber: Revived Rez Wrecks
...
Born on the Blackfeet reservation of northwestern Montana, Jay later moved to New Hampshire with his family after a flood destroyed their home in Montana. He later returned there as an adult to find his roots.
As a student at Salish Kootenai College, in Pablo, Montana, Jay began to explore artistic ideas and discovered ways to use readily available materials from the surrounding environment - utilizing a principle of Native American tradition, "...that you make use of what's available to you in your natural environment."
He began to collect man-made objects, such as parts from junked cars he found in the fields and back roads of the Flathead reservation that had long ago been abandoned, to use as the raw materials for his sculptures. He created his first monumental metal sculptures, while he was still a student. He calls his work, "Reborn Rez Wrecks."
He sold his first recycled warrior to his art instructor at that time. His success began to spring forth as he won the "People's Choice" award at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium's annual conference in Billings, Montana in 1999 with a larger-than-life bison sculpture. This work was later purchased by Westphalian State University in Muenster, Germany.
Laber's memory of the flood that destroyed his family's home inspired a sculpture for which he was commissioned by his native Blackfeet Reservation. In 2000, he completed work on eight life-size warriors on horseback from metal recovered from wrecked cars left deserted along nearby riverbanks by the 1963 flood. His Blackfeet Reservation Sentries, carefully crafted from relics of the past, now stand guard at the four entrances to the Reservation.
Much of Jay's present work is done on a commission basis, among which is his recently completed sculpture, "A Warrior's Offering," which he designed for the Rocky Boy's Reservation in north-central Montana. Another recent work, "Two Left Feet Dancing Free," was purchased by the town of Stevensville, Montana.
From October 21 to 25 Jay will be the Holter's fourth 2013 Cultural Crossroads Artist-in-Residence, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which will provide educational programs at the Museum for Helena middle school students.
This exhibition and the Cultural Crossroads Artist-in-Residence Program are generously sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Montana Arts Council, the Montana Cultural Trust, and members of the Holter Museum of Art.
Image: Jay Laber, Swift Fox, metal sculpture, 2004, Montana Historical Society, 2005.17.01
Click a photo for an enlargement:
Home - Jay Laber, Blackfeet Artist
www.jaylaber.com, 12 Oct 2004 [cached]
Jay Polite Laber is an artist whose work is monumental; monumental in format, and monumental in content.His ideas blossom in the fertile soil of his Blackfeet heritage and sprout from a junkyard of auto parts that find new life in his sculpture.
"Revised Rez Wrecks" is what he calls his pieces; figures and animals that greet travelers at the gates of Montana's Blackfeet Reservation, students at the University of Montana, and visitors at Westphalian State University in Germany.
Jay's large-format artwork is typically created on commission, but his creativity does not limit itself to schedules and business orders.He teaches classes at Salish-Kootenai College in Pablo, Montana and his artistic influence extends into the inspiration and work of his students and admirers worldwide.
At one, Jay Laber of the ...
www.missoula.com, 15 May 2009 [cached]
At one, Jay Laber of the Salish Kootenai College Art Department ran games that emphasized communication. Laber divided Beverly Schallock's fifth-grade class from Polson Middle School into two teams, one of boys, one of girls.
...
Laber had pounded many stakes into the ground as obstacles.
...
While Laber was running his games on the Red Loop at the southern end of the grounds along the river, a horse sculpture the artist made from parts of old cars once abandoned in the Flathead River was standing tall next to the Backcountry Horseman station on the Blue Loop at the north end.
"Terry Tanner (of the Natural Resources Department) called me and said I should come take a look at it before he crushed it," Laber said.
Holter Museum of Art | Calendar
www.holtermuseum.org, 1 June 2013 [cached]
Jay Laber: Revived Rez Wrecks
...
Born on the Blackfeet reservation of northwestern Montana, Jay later moved to New Hampshire with his family after a flood destroyed their home in Montana. He later returned there as an adult to find his roots.
As a student at Salish Kootenai College, in Pablo, Montana, Jay began to explore artistic ideas and discovered ways to use readily available materials from the surrounding environment - utilizing a principle of Native American tradition, "...that you make use of what's available to you in your natural environment."
He began to collect man-made objects, such as parts from junked cars he found in the fields and back roads of the Flathead reservation that had long ago been abandoned, to use as the raw materials for his sculptures. He created his first monumental metal sculptures, while he was still a student. He calls his work, "Reborn Rez Wrecks."
He sold his first recycled warrior to his art instructor at that time. His success began to spring forth as he won the "People's Choice" award at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium's annual conference in Billings, Montana in 1999 with a larger-than-life bison sculpture. This work was later purchased by Westphalian State University in Muenster, Germany.
Laber's memory of the flood that destroyed his family's home inspired a sculpture for which he was commissioned by his native Blackfeet Reservation. In 2000, he completed work on eight life-size warriors on horseback from metal recovered from wrecked cars left deserted along nearby riverbanks by the 1963 flood. His Blackfeet Reservation Sentries, carefully crafted from relics of the past, now stand guard at the four entrances to the Reservation.
Much of Jay's present work is done on a commission basis, among which is his recently completed sculpture, "A Warrior's Offering," which he designed for the Rocky Boy's Reservation in north-central Montana. Another recent work, "Two Left Feet Dancing Free," was purchased by the town of Stevensville, Montana.
From October 21 to 25 Jay will be the Holter's fourth 2013 Cultural Crossroads Artist-in-Residence, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which will provide educational programs at the Museum for Helena middle school students.
This exhibition and the Cultural Crossroads Artist-in-Residence Program are generously sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Montana Arts Council, the Montana Cultural Trust, and members of the Holter Museum of Art.
Image: Jay Laber, Swift Fox, metal sculpture, 2004, Montana Historical Society, 2005.17.01
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