About | Free Trial

Last Update

2015-07-10T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Jay Haffner?

Jay Haffner B.

District Fisheries Biologist

Freshwater Fisheries

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Freshwater Fisheries

Background Information

Employment History

District Fisheries Supervisor

Freshwater Fisheries

District III Fisheries Biologist

Freshwater Fisheries

District Fisheries Biologist

Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries

District Fisheries Supervisor

Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries

District III Fisheries Biologist

Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries

District Fisheries Biologist

ADCNR

Member, Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries

ADCNR

Supervisor, Vacant, Biologist

Alabama Department of Conservation

Affiliations

Board Member
Alabama Wildlife Federation

Web References (40 Total References)


"It seems that way," said Jay ...

www.tuscaloosanews.com [cached]

"It seems that way," said Jay Haffner, district fisheries biologist for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. It seems that way on the river. It seems that way on our state lakes."

But Haffner also notes that people catch more catfish at this time of year because more people are fishing for catfish at this time of year. So are they really biting better or are people just putting more effort into fishing for catfish?
"I think it's a little of both," Haffner said.
Catfish spawn during the spring. They go into rock crevasses or an old bucket or hollow log on the bottom of the river or stream to lay their eggs. It takes a good bit of effort that tends to distract from feeding.
"When it's post spawn, catfish get back into feeding," Haffner said. "That's happening pretty much right now. And there are a whole lot of guys who say crappie season is over and come Fourth of July, a lot of guys are putting away their bass tackle. It's the natural progression of what's next to fish for."
Catfish aren't technically a sport fish in Alabama so the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries doesn't spend a lot to time studying the fish or their habits.
"Most of our efforts go toward studying bass or crappie," Haffner said.
...
"It takes a lot of effort to catch big catfish," Haffner said.
...
It is legal to use bream for live bait, Haffner said.
...
Haffner said rooster livers are more expensive but they're tougher and seem to work better than chicken livers.
"Channels and blues are using their whiskers to detect food on the bottom," Haffner said.
...
"In lakes this time of year where it's impounded by a dam and it's not a flowing river, water stratifies because of temperature," Haffner said.
...
"I know people who are catching 30 or 40 pounders in Holt and Bankhead in 10 feet or less," Haffner said.
Most of those people are fishing late in the evening or at night, he said.
Dam tailraces are among the most popular places for catfish. The water is rich in oxygen and bait fish falling over the spillway can be killed, injured or stunned making them easy prey for predators, including catfish.
Other good places to look for catfish include rock ledges where there is a drop off into the main river channel. Catfish also look for eddies in river bends where they don't have to fight the current and can scavenge or pick off bait fish that flow by, Haffner said.
Haffner said people should be aware that it is illegal for anglers to possess more than one catfish over 34 inches in total lengthy.
...
That's when a lot of anglers turn to catfish.But is it really true that the hotter it gets, the better the catfish bite?"It seems that way," said Jay Haffner, district fisheries biologist for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. It seems that way on the river. It seems that way on our state lakes."But Haffner also notes that people catch more catfish at this time of year because more people are fishing for catfish at this time of year. So are they really biting better or are people just putting more effort into fishing for catfish?"I think it's a little of both," Haffner said.Catfish spawn during the spring. They go into rock crevasses or an old bucket or hollow log on the bottom of the river or stream to lay their eggs. It takes a good bit of effort that tends to distract from feeding."When it's post spawn, catfish get back into feeding," Haffner said. "That's happening pretty much right now. And there are a whole lot of guys who say crappie season is over and come Fourth of July, a lot of guys are putting away their bass tackle. It's the natural progression of what's next to fish for."Catfish aren't technically a sport fish in Alabama so the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries doesn't spend a lot to time studying the fish or their habits."Most of our efforts go toward studying bass or crappie," Haffner said. "In the past 25 years I've been in West Alabama, I can count on one hand the number of days I've spent sampling catfish on the river."Not only that, but fishing for catfish is generally perceived as a sport for the older generation. It's often looked on as a laid-back sport. But there are dedicated catfish anglers and some of them even specialize and one of the three species found in West Alabama - channel, blue and yellow or flathead catfish.Catfish offer anglers an opportunity to catch large fish and they are an under-utilized resource. Tactics are relatively simple but success doesn't always come easily."It takes a lot of effort to catch big catfish," Haffner said. "And it's a young man's game going out early and running trot lines."Yellow cats have the reputation for being the best eating catfish, although not everyone agrees. They also have different habits from channel and blue cats. Flatheads feed almost exclusively on live bait.Yellow cat anglers frequently use goldfish or small bream. It is legal to use bream for live bait, Haffner said. But because sunfish are game fish in Alabama, they must be caught by legal means - hook and line. It's illegal to catch bream with a cast net or seine even if those bream are in a private farm pond.Blues and channel cats are bottom feeders. Their whiskers serve as their olfactory sensor so smell is important. Shad is an oily, smelly fish and works well as do commercial stink baits and chicken or rooster livers. Haffner said rooster livers are more expensive but they're tougher and seem to work better than chicken livers."Channels and blues are using their whiskers to detect food on the bottom," Haffner said. "These fish are opportunistic feeders. They're on the bottom and they'll eat what's available."But that doesn't mean that they are on the bottom in the deepest water, he said. That's particularly true for lakes like Lake Tuscaloosa where there isn't a lot of flow."In lakes this time of year where it's impounded by a dam and it's not a flowing river, water stratifies because of temperature," Haffner said.
...
Catfish also look for eddies in river bends where they don't have to fight the current and can scavenge or pick off bait fish that flow by, Haffner said.Haffner said people should be aware that it is illegal for anglers to possess more than one catfish over 34 inches in total lengthy.


But Jay Haffner, District ...

www.tuscaloosanews.com [cached]

But Jay Haffner, District Fisheries Supervisor for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries, said it's not the only time for anglers to catch sunfish in West Alabama.

"Usually beginning in April with water temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees, bream are going to begin bedding," Haffner said.
...
"Shellcrackers were on the bed as thick as thieves at Lake LU," Haffner said.
...
But Haffner said it's not the only time anglers can catch bream. He believes fishermen have higher success rates because they fish more at this time of year and have more confidence that they will catch fish.
"If you're a bream angler worth your salt in West Alabama, you're fishing around full moons or new moons," Haffner said.
...
"Bluegill need about a week of 80-degree water temperatures for bluegill fry to hatch out," Haffner said.
...
"They're like bass, they want to keep debris and foreign objects out of the bed," Haffner said. "They attack that lure or minnow or jig or red worm just to get it out of their bed."
Most West Alabama anglers use crickets or worms with a small split shot and a bobber on a pole or rod and reel for bream. Others work beds with a fly rod and popping bugs or wet flies. Haffner prefers a 1/16-ounce jig on an ultralight spinning reel.
...
"When anglers are fishing the same reservoir or ponds, they eventually find the bream beds," Haffner said. "Bream tend to use the same places year after year."
There is also good fishing on the river systems. Anglers should look for sandy or gravelly areas.
"From Tuscaloosa south to Demopolis on the river is terrific," Haffner said. "The bream are prettier, they're bigger and there are more of them south of Tuscaloosa. Any backwater on the Warrior or Tombigbee south of Tuscaloosa is usually good."
This year, high, muddy water on the Tombigbee is making it harder to find beds, Haffner said. The Warrior's water is clearer and the beds are easier to find.
Finding bream beds isn't just good for bream fisherman. It's a good place for bass anglers to look for their favorite quarry.
"Bass are going to be where their food source is," Haffner said.
...
"In ponds that are crowded with bass 9-13 inches long, the bass are so plentiful, they've eaten up the bite-sized bream," Haffner said. "The bream that didn't get eaten by bass grow to a large size, because they don't have to compete with their fellow bream. And they get too big for the small bass to eat."
But bream never reach a size that they aren't vulnerable. Bass 8 to 10 pounds can swallow a pretty big bream, Haffner said.
Bluegills and shellcrackers aren't the only species of sunfish in West Alabama. Warmouth (goggleyes), green sunfish, pumpkinseeds and others swim in the area's waters.
"There are many species of sunfish," Haffner said. "But shellcrackers and bluegills are the ones that get the biggest and are the most desirable."
OUTDOORS: Warm weather means the bream will be biting TuscaloosaNews.comApril 26, 2014 12:01 AM For bream fishermen, the full moon coming up in mid-May is the highlight of the year. But Jay Haffner, District Fisheries Supervisor for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries, said it's not the only time for anglers to catch sunfish in West Alabama."Usually beginning in April with water temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees, bream are going to begin bedding," Haffner said. "Primarily redear (popularly known as shellcrackers) are going to bed first. They typically are the first sunfish in West Alabama to bed."That's what Haffner found Thursday when he was taking samples with the state's electric shock boat at Lake LU on the University of West Alabama Campus in Livingston. The dinner-plate-sized beds in shallow water were filled with shellcracker."Shellcrackers were on the bed as thick as thieves at Lake LU," Haffner said. "Typically they are in a little deeper water. These redears at Lake LU were in water no deeper than a foot and a half. "Bream went through the motions of spawning in the middle of April. They are going to go crazy in the middle of May."Bream fishing traditionally peaks during the full moon in May when bluegills spawn in earnest for the first time. But Haffner said it's not the only time anglers can catch bream. He believes fishermen have higher success rates because they fish more at this time of year and have more confidence that they will catch fish."If you're a bream angler worth your salt in West Alabama, you're fishing around full moons or new moons," Haffner said. "But there are bream hatching out all summer long. I think that we get really, really big spawns in May and June. But they're spawning all summer long."Haffner tests West Alabama ponds to determine if they are out of balance. It requires him to seine ponds throughout the summer."By June, I ought to be able to catch a 5-gallon bucket of bluegill fry when I use my minnow seine in a pond," he said.Bluegill that have hatched out are the primary food for bass fingerlings, he said. That makes them an important part of the food chain in local waters."Bluegill need about a week of 80-degree water temperatures for bluegill fry to hatch out," Haffner said. "Bluegill bed in April, but I don't think many bluegill fry hatch out. I think it's May before we get those warmer water temperatures."Bluegill primarily feed on aquatic insects, he said. They make their beds in areas with sand or gravel bottoms. The males clean off a circular area and the females lay eggs in it. The males then fertilize the eggs and hang around to guard the nests."They're like bass, they want to keep debris and foreign objects out of the bed," Haffner said. "They attack that lure or minnow or jig or red worm just to get it out of their bed."Most West Alabama anglers use crickets or worms with a small split shot and a bobber on a pole or rod and reel for bream. Others work beds with a fly rod and popping bugs or wet flies. Haffner prefers a 1/16-ounce jig on an ultralight spinning reel.Just about every private farm pond is stocked with bluegill and many also contain shellcracker. Bluegill spawn so much more frequently than shellcracker that they often out-compete the shellcrackers for food in small impoundments. Shellcrackers tend to survive better in ponds with weedy areas.There are also good opportunities in public waters. The state lakes, Lake LU, Bibb County Lake, Dallas County Lake and Fayette County Lake all have good bream fishing. Ponds in the Black Belt area are the most productive, he said, because of the soil and chalk base."When anglers are fishing the same reservoir or ponds, they eventually find the bream beds," Haffner said. "Bream tend to use the same places year after year."There is also good fishing on the river systems. Anglers should look for sandy or gravelly areas."From Tuscaloosa south to Demopolis on the river is terrific," Haffner said. "The bream are prettier, they're bigger and there are more of them south of Tuscaloosa. Any backwater on the Warrior or Tombigbee south of Tuscaloosa is usually good."This year, high, muddy water on the Tombigbee is making it harder to find beds, Haffner said. The Warrior's water is clearer and the beds are easier to find.Finding bream beds isn't just good for bream fisherman. It's a good place for bass anglers to look for their favorite quarry."Bass are going to be where their food source is," Haffner said. "Bass love to eat bream. I typically see people fishing for bass on the deep edge of bream beds. The bream are hemmed up and adult bass slash through the beds and pick off a bream."Ironically, ponds with too many bass are often great places to find big bream."In ponds that are crowded with bass 9-13 inches long, the bass are so plentiful, they've eaten up the bite-sized bream," Haffner said. "The bream that didn't get eaten by bass grow to a large size, because they don't have to compete with their fellow bream. And they get too big for the small bass to eat."But bream never reach a size that they aren't vulnerable. Bass 8 to 10 pounds can swallow a pretty big bream, Haffner said.Bluegills and shellcrackers aren't the only species of sunfish in West Alabama. Warmouth (goggleyes), green sunfish, pumpkinseeds and others swim in the area's waters."There are many species of sunfish," Haffner said.


AONmagazine.com - Lovelady & Williams Win Lay Lake Open 2007 - Alabama Outdoor News

www.aonmag.com [cached]

Before every one of Mark’s tournaments, anglers release a bag full of fingerling largemouth bass into Lay Lake. “Anytime folks are stocking public waters, prior to doing so they have to receive our blessing to do that through a permitting program that we have,� said Jay Haffner, District III Fisheries Biologist for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries.

...
Habitat, habitat, habitat, when you have it you have a high-quality fishery.� Jay added that reservoirs all along the Coosa chain, not just Lay Lake, are doing well, according to the state’s electro-shocking surveys and seining efforts.


Basics of Pond Management

www.alawild.org [cached]

By Jay B. Haffner, District Fisheries Biologist, ADCNR,


AWF - Magazine - The Basics of Pond Management

www.alabamawildlife.org [cached]

By Jay B. Haffner, District Fisheries Biologist, ADCNR, Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Haffner

Tony Haffner
FSBO International Group Inc

Mona Haffner

Melissa Haffner
Reno Municipal Court

Jenifer Haffner
Teamsters Local Union No. 104

Greg Haffner
Young Democrats

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory