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Wrong Jared Taglialatela?

Jared P. Taglialatela

Assistant Professor of Biology

Sentinel & Enterprise

HQ Phone:  (978) 343-6911

Direct Phone: (470) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Sentinel & Enterprise

808 Main Street

Fitchburg, Massachusetts,01420

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Georgia State University


Assistant Professor of Biology

Kennesaw State University


Biology Professor

KSU Sentinel


Researcher

State University of Clayton


Chimpanzee Communication Researcher

Clayton College & State University


Research Associate, Division of Psychobiology

Yerkes National Primate Research Center


Web References(37 Total References)


CCS | Founding Members

comparativecognition.org [cached]

Jared P. Taglialatela, Georgia State University


Alumni | DuMond Conservancy

dumondconservancy.org [cached]

Jared Taglialatela
University of Virginia Kennesaw State University


www.ksusentinel.com

KSU biology professor Dr. Jared Taglialatela discovered that chimpanzees learn attention getting sounds from observing their mothers.
Taglia... Continue Reading


2007 ChimpanZoo Conference

www.chimpanzoo.org [cached]

Jared P. Taglialatela, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow Yerkes National Primate Research Center Jared Taglialatela is a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award postdoctoral fellow at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Georgia. He received his BA in biology from the University of Virginia, and his PhD in neurobiology and behavior from Georgia State University in 2004. While in graduate school, Dr. Taglialatela worked with the language-competent bonobos at the Language Research Center in Atlanta, GA under the direction of Sue Savage-Rumbaugh and Duane Rumbaugh. Dr. Taglialatela's research focuses on animal communication, specifically primate vocal and gestural behavior, the communicative function of these signals, and how individuals produce and perceive these utterances. Dr. Taglialatela's research is supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Jared is also an Eco-Team leader, for the Emory University Roots and Shoots.


www.ksusentinel.com

KSU biology professor Dr. Jared Taglialatela discovered that chimpanzees learn attention getting sounds from observing their mothers.
Taglialatela, with a three man research team, observed a community of 158 captive chimpanzees at the Michale E. Keeling Center of Comparative Medicine and Research in Bastrop, TX to determine how particular attention getting sounds are passed down from one generation to the next. The study revealed that three-fourths of the chimpanzees raised by their mothers made attention getting sounds, while only one-third of those raised by humans did. Taglialatela defined attention getting sounds as a particular vocalization such as a "raspberry" or "kiss" to illicit a response from an observer outside the compound. Because it was determined that these calls are largely learned through social interaction, Taglialatela said he is interested to look deeper into how chimpanzees raised by humans still managed to learn this behavior. Until this study, it was believed that developing communication through social learning did not occur with primates. According to Taglialatela scientists believed that learning skill was developed later in the evolution of modern man. This study proves otherwise and can lead scientists to rethink how man learned language. "Perhaps down the road if we learn a little bit more about the brain regions that are responsible for mediating this behavior when we start thinking about early development disorders in humans like autism. It may be that we learn how these behaviors arise and how they are handled by the brain… we may be able to develop interventions for really young children," Taglialatela said. Sarah Pope, a research assistant for Taglialatela and 2011 graduate, has analyzed data for the professor's previous studies and offered insight on the recent findings. Taglialatela said he looks to continue his 14-year career in primate behavior research by observing a community of 100 chimpanzees in their natural habitat in Uganda. "It is a unique group of chimpanzees because it is what's called a dry forest habitat that borders savanna grassland… the chimpanzees have to range over a relatively wide territory. For someone who studies communication I have to think about a very similar scenario early humans might have found themselves in. How do they use communicative signals to coordinate group interaction?" Taglialatela expressed excitement that this particular community could exhibit unique means of communication as a result of their surroundings.


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