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Wrong Janet Steiss?

Janet E. Steiss

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Tuskegee University

HQ Phone:  (334) 727-8011

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Tuskegee University

1200 W MONTGOMERY RD

Tuskegee, Alabama,36088

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1881 by Booker T. Washington, Tuskegee University is home to approximately 3,000 students from the U.S. and 30 foreign countries. The academic programs are organized into seven colleges and schools: 1.) Andrew F. Brimmer College of Business and Info...more

Background Information

Employment History

Professor In the College of Veterinary Medicine

Auburn University


Affiliations

American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

Board Member


Denton Animal Shelter Foundation Inc

Board Member


Association of Shelter Veterinarians

Faculty Advisor To the Auburn Student Chapter


IAVRPT

Executive Board


Education

Masters Program in Physical Therapy

University of Alabama at Birmingham


DVM

American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation


DVM

Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine


DVM

Ontario Veterinary College


PhD

University of Georgia


Web References(50 Total References)


The Facts About Modern Electronic Training Devices - Sit Means Sit Dog Training Phoenix

dogonittraining.com [cached]

In 2003 a team led by Janet Steiss, D.V.M, Ph.D., of the Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine, conducted a four-week study of adult shelter dogs' physiological and behavioral responses to bark control collars.
Dogs were randomly assigned to either an electronic collar or the control group. At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Steiss and her team concluded that electronic bark collars were not only effective in controlling excessive barking, but that they also did not cause any lingering adverse physiological effects. [3] Janet Steiss, D.V.M., Ph.D., PT; C. Schaffer, D.V.M.; H.A. Ahmad, Ph.D., MBA; "Evaluation of Dogs Wearing Bark Control Collars," investigator report, Oct. 24, 2003.


Dog Training Collars

www.dogdoright.com [cached]

Dr Janet Steiss of the Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine conducted a four-week study of adult shelter dogs' physiological and behavioral responses to bark control collars.
At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Steiss and her team concluded that electronic bark collars were not only effective in controlling excessive barking, but that they also did not cause any lingering adverse physiological effects.


blog1.rspcasa.asn.au

The study performed by Dr Janet Steiss does not appear to have been published in a peer review journal.In 2003 a team led by Janet Steiss, D.V.M, PhD, of theTuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine,conducted a 4-week study of adult shelter dogs' physiologicaland behavioral responses to bark control collars.Dogs were randomly assigned to either an electronic collar orthe control group.At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Steiss and her team


Dancing Doberman Disease Final

www.dpfa.org [cached]

The lead investigator for this study was Janet E. Steiss, DVM, PhD, PT. Dr. Steiss presented the results of her research at the August 2001 Central Veterinary Conference in Kansas City.Janet Steiss, DVM, PhD, PTAssociate Professor, Department of Biomedical SciencesTuskegee University College of Veterinary MedicineTuskegee, AL 36088Phone:334-727-8066FAX:334-727-8177Submitted by Janet Steiss, DVM, PhD, PTDr. Janet Steiss graduated from Ontario Veterinary College in 1975.After working in a mixed practice, she graduated with a PhD from the Veterinary College, University of Georgia.From 1986 to 1999 she served on the faculty at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, focusing on electrodiagnostic testing and research on neuromuscular diseases of dogs.Dr. Steiss received a Masters Degree in Physical Therapy from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 2000 and currently is an Associate Professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Tuskegee University, where she continues to investigate muscle disorders of sporting and working dogs.She is President of The American Canine Sports Medicine Association, and is certified by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society.


E-collar « Sit Means Sit Dog Training – Phoenix

dogonittraining.com [cached]

In 2003 a four-week study of shelter dogs conducted by Janet Steiss, D.V.M. Ph.D. "At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Steiss and her team concluded that electronic bark collars were not only effective in controlling excessive barking, but that they also did not cause any lingering adverse physiological effects."
In 2003 a team led by Janet Steiss, D.V.M, Ph.D., of the Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine, conducted a four-week study of adult shelter dogs' physiological and behavioral responses to bark control collars. Dogs were randomly assigned to either an electronic collar or the control group. At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Steiss and her team concluded that electronic bark collars were not only effective in controlling excessive barking, but that they also did not cause any lingering adverse physiological effects. [3] Janet Steiss, D.V.M., Ph.D., PT; C. Schaffer, D.V.M.; H.A. Ahmad, Ph.D., MBA; "Evaluation of Dogs Wearing Bark Control Collars," investigator report, Oct. 24, 2003.


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