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This profile was last updated on 5/6/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Dr. Janet Nesheim

Wrong Dr. Janet Nesheim?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Curator
    Horse Museum
  • Curator
    American Saddlebred Horse Museum
  • Secretary To the President
    Callaway Bank
  • President
    A.M.C. Hospital Auxiliary
  • Dr. L.D.

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Board Member
    National Amateur Field Trial Clubs of America
  • Member
    Historical Society's 11

Education

  • Flint School
  • Washington University
Web References
Audrain County Historical Society
www.audrain.org, 31 Mar 2006 [cached]
Read about Rex and the American Saddlebred Horse Museum Curator, Jan Nesheim, in this article written by Jane Simmons.
...
Jan Nesheim: Guides Saddlebred Horse Museum
...
The project depended largely upon Irma’s many years of teaching equitation and knowledge of horses, owners and handlers,” Jan told me, and “Nathalie’s research expertise.”
...
Jan told me that my mother had “loaned the museum a number of silver trophies for dedications and was always available with a helping hand.” The museum has Irma’s double sidesaddle in its collection, the one she used for on-horse teaching of riding.
For the horse museum committee’s meetings, “we used the Bride’s Room on the second floor of the Society’s mansion,” Janet said.
...
The magazine’s former owner, “Bill Thompson, came to the Museum following its construction and helped us with various valuable suggestions,” Jan noted.
...
“The first official mention of the horse museum in the Society’s Minutes was November 29, 1966, when it was reported that $6,756.39 was in the proposed museum’s fund,” Jan pointed out. By the “following month’s Minutes, the fund had increased to $12,500,” she noted. “A Kansas City Philharmonic concert and Missouri Arts Council support” brought in “$2,040.25 earmarked for the Horse Museum in 1966.”
“In January 1968, the Board commissioned Kramer & Harms Architects of St. Louis,” Jan said, “to draw up the planned building in keeping with the historical architectural period of Graceland” and to attach it “by a walkway to the north side of the mansion.”
Jan said: “in October 6, 1969’s Minutes, the Board voted to approve $40,000 for Rheinhardt Construction Company of Centralia to build the museum, without a basement.”
...
The Breeders’ contribution plus some local funding “produced the $40,000 required to start construction of the museum.” In those early days, Jan said, the museum committee worked “every day including Sunday afternoons to create the best museum possible.”
The “door key to the new American Saddlebred Horse Museum building was turned over to us on January 5, 1970.” The following month, Jan “was appointed Chair of the committee that was to create the collection which would convert the new empty building into a display-filled museum.”
Thanks to “local newspaperman, L. Mitchell White,” the Society had a “vast collection of Currier & Ives prints” for inclusion. He “had been housing this collection and hundreds of boxes of horse artifacts and memorabilia in an airplane hanger at the Mexico airport,” Jan said.
“The University of Missouri’s Director of Displays offered suggestions to us for special museum effects, and we solicited help too from the Missouri Historical Society for proper display techniques. We were committed to displaying ONLY items that could be identified,” Jan emphasized. She encourages everyone, as she has since 1970, to “come see this fantastic educational and historic collection.”
The “Preview Dedication was held on August 8, 1970,” and “the Official Dedication of the Horse Museum was the following week on August 16, when U.S. Senator Stuart Symington gave a speech,” along with other dignitaries, Jan noted.
...
Horse Museum Curator Jan Nesheim was born in McCredie, Missouri, on August 30, 1929, the daughter of Jesse Boone, Sr. and Edith Virginia Baber.
...
Jan has “one brother, Jesse Boone, Jr., who is 13 months older and currently lives in Mexico.” She arrived as part of her father’s second family; when she was born, she “had one half-brother and one half-sister, both of whom were grown.”
...
Jan “attended Flint School near Hatton.” She “was graduated from the Fulton school system in 1947” and “worked as Secretary to the President of the Callaway Bank there.”
In 1953, Jan “joined two college friends in St. Louis” to attend night school at Washington University. She was “working for the Dr. L.D. Le Gear veterinarian pharmaceutical company run by his son, Daniel.” She “lived in University City, going to the college classes by streetcar.” On a vacation in 1957, Jan “traveled with a girlfriend to Havana, Cuba.” Both girls “were surprised and a bit frightened by men with machine guns atop the Presidential Palace, as we sat in the park writing cards to friends. It was the beginning of the revolution.”
When traveling home to visit her family on weekends, she “would ride the Wabash train between Delmar Station and the Mexico depot.” It was on one of these trips home that Jan’s life moved into a very different direction.
Her mother had an appointment with the family doctor one weekend when Jan “arrived with a sore throat.” Her mom convinced her “to accompany her for an appointment with osteopathic physician and surgeon, Dr. Harold Invold Nesheim.
Even though, “I had known Dr. Nesheim all of my life as one of my family’s doctors, my heart did a flipflop” when “he walked into the room that day,” Jan revealed.
Dr. Nesheim told Jan he traveled to St. Louis “frequently” and asked if she “would be interested in going to the city’s next Field Trials” during “quail time” in February. After all, he said, she “might meet some potential ad buyers for her veterinarians’ drug publication.” Jan said “Nesh” was “President of the Missouri Open Championships for several years.” He “also was on the Board of Directors of the National Amateur Field Trial Clubs of America,” as well as many other related organizations. “Bird-hunting was his hobby and he pursued it all of his life.”
He called Jan and they “rode horseback together at the Trials in the spring of 1958.” Soon thereafter, he asked her to marry him. Dr. Nesheim, “was a widower with one daughter Martha.”
...
The “wedding was held in St. Louis on June 2, 1958, at Westminster Presbyterian Church” where Jan “was a choir member. “He and Jan had no children of their own. They “were married 40 years, until his passing on February 2, 1998.”
Living on acreage across from a huge lake on the south edge of Mexico, they “always had horses in a paddock there” and at their “80-acre farm five miles out in the country.” Over the years, they “owned a Celebration championship-winning Walking Horse called Royal – a roan with four white socks and a diamond-shaped marking on his nose.” His owner had asked the Nesheims to retire the horse to their place. They also owned “several field trial horses.” Jan told me they “also bought a three-gaited – Fairview’s Captain – at one of local horseman Bill Cunningham’s sales.”
Jan “led a Girl Scout group for several years on Mounted Patrol Drills, and on trail rides” that were “directed by Butch Early over the grounds of the A.P. Green estate nearby.”
The Nesheims kept “white quail” and “exotic birds, including Lady Amhurst, Golden and Silver Pheasants.” Her husband, “as a Field Trials and bird hunting judge, held such events in Canada and Mexico, and supervised many others around the country, including Hawaii,” she said.
When they married, Dr. Nesheim “already had been a member of the Historical Society for a number of years” even “before the group owned Graceland.” Also active in the Society were other Mexico leaders: Robert Green, who served as its first President from 1953 – 1963, and then Bradford Brett, L. Mitchell White, Martha Staley, Robert M. White II, Charles Stribling, Louis Boyes, and Jan (who served from 1981 – 1986). When they married, Dr. Nesheim “already had been a member of the Historical Society for a number of years” even “before the group owned Graceland.” Also active in the Society were other Mexico leaders: Robert Green, who served as its first President from 1953 – 1963, and then Bradford Brett, L. Mitchell White, Martha Staley, Robert M. White II, Charles Stribling, Louis Boyes, and Jan (who served from 1981 – 1986).
...
In 1999, another big event “was a Tom Bass Celebration event held in conjunction with the unveiling of the famed horseman’s bust in the State Capitol’s Rotunda” that is filled with those of other distinguished Missourians, Jan said. The then-Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives Steve Gaw, “who is a Saddlebred Horse owner, led a three-day trail ride from the Mexico Saddlebred Horse Museum to the Capitol in Jefferson City” as a part of the commemoration.
As for Jan, she said, it has been a “perfectly wonderful adventure” and “a highlight of my life. I am honored to have been a part of the creation of the Museum that helps to preserve the history of the exquisite American Saddlebred Horse. It’s been a dream of a lifetime for me.” She encourages everyone, as she has since 1970, to “come see this fantastic educational and historic collection.”
You may contact Jan Nesheim in care of the American Saddlebred Horse Museum
Jan ...
www.mexicoledger.com, 26 Aug 2008 [cached]
Jan Nesheim
...
Jan was born Aug. 30, 1929 in Fulton, the daughter of Jesse B. and Edythe V. (Berry) Baber.
...
Jan was a longtime member of First Presbyterian Church, having participated in the Chancel Choir for over 50 years.She was a member of the Audrain County Historical Society, where she helped develop the horse museum, and was former president of the A.M.C. Hospital Auxiliary.She loved bridge, golf, taking care of her yard and flowers, which she was known for her cannas.
Simmons August 04
www.saddleandbridle.com, 17 Aug 2004 [cached]
Jan Nesheim:Guides Saddlebred Horse Museum
...
Jan Nesheim in Mexico, Mo., Saddlebred Horse Museum.
...
The project depended largely upon Irma's many years of teaching equitation and knowledge of horses, owners and handlers," Jan told me, and "Nathalie's research expertise."She told me Betty (Mrs. Bob) Hook, Hilda (Mrs. Leonard) Hook and "Ollie" (Mrs. Arthur) Simmons also helped over the years.Jan told me that my mother had "loaned the museum a number of silver trophies for dedications and was always available with a helping hand."The museum has Irma's double sidesaddle in its collection, the one she used for on-horse teaching of riding.
...
Horse Museum Curator Jan Nesheim was born in McCredie, Missouri, on August 30, 1929, the daughter of Jesse Boone, Sr. and Edith Virginia Baber.
...
Jan has "one brother, Jesse Boone, Jr., who is 13 months older and currently lives in Mexico."
...
Jan "attended Flint School near Hatton."She "was graduated from the Fulton school system in 1947" and "worked as Secretary to the President of the Callaway Bank there."In 1953, Jan "joined two college friends in St. Louis" to attend night school at Washington University.She was "working for the Dr. L.D.
...
On a vacation in 1957, Jan "traveled with a girlfriend to Havana, Cuba."
...
Her mother had an appointment with the family doctor one weekend when Jan "arrived with a sore throat."Her mom convinced her "to accompany her for an appointment with osteopathic physician and surgeon, Dr. Harold Invold Nesheim.
Even though, "I had known Dr. Nesheim all of my life as one of my family's doctors, my heart did a flipflop" when "he walked into the room that day," Jan revealed.Dr. Nesheim told Jan he traveled to St. Louis "frequently" and asked if she "would be interested in going to the city's next Field Trials" during "quail time" in February.After all, he said, she "might meet some potential ad buyers for her veterinarians' drug publication."Jan said "Nesh" was "President of the Missouri Open Championships for several years."He "also was on the Board of Directors of the National Amateur Field Trial Clubs of America," as well as many other related organizations."Bird-hunting was his hobby and he pursued it all of his life."
He called Jan and they "rode horseback together at the Trials in the spring of 1958."Soon thereafter, he asked her to marry him.Dr. Nesheim, "was a widower with one daughter Martha."
...
The "wedding was held in St. Louis on June 2, 1958, at Westminster Presbyterian Church" where Jan "was a choir member."He and Jan had no children of their own.
...
Jan told me they "also bought a three-gaited - Fairview's Captain - at one of local horseman Bill Cunningham's sales."
Jan "led a Girl Scout group for several years on Mounted Patrol Drills, and on trail rides" that were "directed by Butch Early over the grounds of the A.P. Green estate nearby."The Nesheims kept "white quail" and "exotic birds, including Lady Amhurst, Golden and Silver Pheasants."Her husband, "as a Field Trials and bird hunting judge, held such events in Canada and Mexico, and supervised many others around the country, including Hawaii," she said.
When they married, Dr. Nesheim "already had been a member of the Historical Society for a number of years" even "before the group owned Graceland."Also active in the Society were other Mexico leaders: Robert Green, who served as its first President from 1953 - 1963, and then Bradford Brett, L. Mitchell White, Martha Staley, Robert M. White II, Charles Stribling, Louis Boyes, and Jan (who served from 1981 - 1986).
...
In 1999, another big event "was a Tom Bass Celebration event held in conjunction with the unveiling of the famed horseman's bust in the State Capitol's Rotunda" that is filled with those of other distinguished Missourians, Jan said.The then-Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives Steve Gaw, "who is a Saddlebred Horse owner, led a three-day trail ride from the Mexico Saddlebred Horse Museum to the Capitol in Jefferson City" as a part of the commemoration.
As for Jan, she said, it has been a "perfectly wonderful adventure" and "a highlight of my life.I am honored to have been a part of the creation of the Museum that helps to preserve the history of the exquisite American Saddlebred Horse.It's been a dream of a lifetime for me." She encourages everyone, as she has since 1970, to "come see this fantastic educational and historic collection."
You may contact Jan Nesheim in care of the American Saddlebred Horse Museum, 501 S. Muldrow Street, Mexico, MO 65265 and also wish her a Happy Birthday or through the Museum's Director, Dana Keller, by phone: (w) (573) 581-3910 or her e-mail: dkeller@audrain.org
Audrain County Historical Society
www.audrain.org, 31 Mar 2006 [cached]
Read about Rex and the American Saddlebred Horse Museum Curator, Jan Nesheim, in this article written by Jane Simmons.
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