No Photo Available

Last Update

2006-01-01T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Student

The Ohio State University

Education

Ohio State University

visual communications degree

OSU

Web References (2 Total References)


John C Jay — AIGA | the professional association for design

www.gainconference2006.aiga.org [cached]

Designers: John C Jay and Janet Jay/Studio J; Lighting design: Yuri Kinoshita; Client: Ping Restaurant, Andy Ricker, Kurt Huffman, John C Jay, Janet Jay

...
With his wife, Janet, he runs Studio J, an independent creative consultancy located in Portland's Old Town/Chinatown, where they develop new lifestyle concepts, products and experiences, from residences to restaurants. One such development project is a floating home on the Columbia River inspired by the Minka style of Japanese rural architecture. Another is the James Beard Award-nominated restaurant Ping, of which Studio J is part owner. "Studio J is trying to bring a new vision and energy to the area," says Jay. "My goal is to help shape a new creative corridor of this city based upon contemporary Asian creativity and culture. So, if successful, my next 'adventure' is the creative direction of a full city block in Chinatown."
If it seems as though Jay is constantly working, then you have the right impression. He has an almost limitless passion for creating and delights in sharing his enthusiasm with others. For the last 15 years, he has hosted art salons with the sole purpose of bringing together artists of varied disciplines, from graphic design to painting to journalism. He credits Diane Von Furstenberg, whose now-legendary gatherings he attended in the 1980s in her then-expansive Fifth Avenue apartment overlooking the Metropolitan Museum in New York, with the perfection of the format. Of his desire to bring creative people together, he says, "It has nothing to do with making money... nothing to do with getting work. It's about being a conduit for culture and information."
Jay thinks quite a bit about culture and information, and approaches branding with a prescience that has allowed him to anticipate trends and tell people exactly the stories they want to hear. For W+K Tokyo in 1999, Jay, tasked with creating new basketball mythologies in a post-Michael Jordan world, turned to Japanese hip-hop, a genre that was then finding its voice and beginning to embrace its own cultural relevance. Jay saw a chance to tell the compelling stories of three new athletes Kevin Garnett, Tim Duncan and Jason "White Chocolate" Williams through the prism of that musical genre and lifestyle.
...
By 1997 Nike sales had swelled to $9.2 billion; at the same time Jay was cultivating an antiestablishment identity for the athletic brand with a campaign centered on street basketball and captured in an award-winning book, Soul of the Game.
One of the traits that make Jay unique in the advertising world is his genuine appreciation of the opportunities his success has created, perhaps because he didn't always have them. The first child of Chinese immigrants living in Columbus, Ohio, Jay grew up sharing one large backroom at his parents' business, a laundry. He picked up his first English words by watching car commercials on television. He would stand on a corner downtown watching traffic, "spotting the cars, matching their shapes to the commercials and practicing the 'sound' of their logo," he says.
More than once, he got in trouble with his parents for drawing on their walls. Those early drawings often depicted the toys he wished he owned-robots, space guns, airplanes-and the Art Deco LeVeque Tower, then Columbus' tallest building.
...
All of it-the drawing, the early obsessions with cars, architecture and toy space guns-might have led him to a career in industrial design had Jay and his family known that such a path existed. It wasn't until he was a student at Ohio State University that a friend suggested he take a course in visual communications. Soon he was devouring European design magazines in the university library. "It was startlingly new," says Jay, and he knew he was finally in his element. Although his new calling was initially a tough sell with his (eventually supportive) parents, Jay graduated from OSU in 1971 with a visual communications degree.
...
Jay is continually actualizing those lessons in his work. In October 2009 Studio J organized an exhibition of contemporary Chinese design, "The Jelly Generation," in the Old Town neighborhood. And in late 2009 he and hotelier Alex Calderwood co-edited and creative-directed an issue of Arkitip magazine celebrating, of all things, great collaborations.
How does he sustain all of this constant self-reinvention? "It's still fun. That's why I work so hard," says Jay.


Designers: John C Jay and Janet ...

www.aiga.org [cached]

Designers: John C Jay and Janet Jay/Studio J; Lighting design: Yuri Kinoshita; Client: Ping Restaurant, Andy Ricker, Kurt Huffman, John C Jay, Janet Jay

...
With his wife, Janet, he runs Studio J, an independent creative consultancy located in Portland's Old Town/Chinatown, where they develop new lifestyle concepts, products and experiences, from residences to restaurants. One such development project is a floating home on the Columbia River inspired by the Minka style of Japanese rural architecture. Another is the James Beard Award-nominated restaurant Ping, of which Studio J is part owner. "Studio J is trying to bring a new vision and energy to the area," says Jay. "My goal is to help shape a new creative corridor of this city based upon contemporary Asian creativity and culture. So, if successful, my next 'adventure' is the creative direction of a full city block in Chinatown."
If it seems as though Jay is constantly working, then you have the right impression. He has an almost limitless passion for creating and delights in sharing his enthusiasm with others. For the last 15 years, he has hosted art salons with the sole purpose of bringing together artists of varied disciplines, from graphic design to painting to journalism. He credits Diane Von Furstenberg, whose now-legendary gatherings he attended in the 1980s in her then-expansive Fifth Avenue apartment overlooking the Metropolitan Museum in New York, with the perfection of the format. Of his desire to bring creative people together, he says, "It has nothing to do with making money… nothing to do with getting work. It's about being a conduit for culture and information."
Jay thinks quite a bit about culture and information, and approaches branding with a prescience that has allowed him to anticipate trends and tell people exactly the stories they want to hear. For W+K Tokyo in 1999, Jay, tasked with creating new basketball mythologies in a post-Michael Jordan world, turned to Japanese hip-hop, a genre that was then finding its voice and beginning to embrace its own cultural relevance. Jay saw a chance to tell the compelling stories of three new athletes Kevin Garnett, Tim Duncan and Jason "White Chocolate" Williams through the prism of that musical genre and lifestyle.
...
By 1997 Nike sales had swelled to $9.2 billion; at the same time Jay was cultivating an antiestablishment identity for the athletic brand with a campaign centered on street basketball and captured in an award-winning book, Soul of the Game.
One of the traits that make Jay unique in the advertising world is his genuine appreciation of the opportunities his success has created, perhaps because he didn't always have them. The first child of Chinese immigrants living in Columbus, Ohio, Jay grew up sharing one large backroom at his parents' business, a laundry. He picked up his first English words by watching car commercials on television. He would stand on a corner downtown watching traffic, "spotting the cars, matching their shapes to the commercials and practicing the 'sound' of their logo," he says.
More than once, he got in trouble with his parents for drawing on their walls. Those early drawings often depicted the toys he wished he owned-robots, space guns, airplanes-and the Art Deco LeVeque Tower, then Columbus' tallest building.
...
All of it-the drawing, the early obsessions with cars, architecture and toy space guns-might have led him to a career in industrial design had Jay and his family known that such a path existed. It wasn't until he was a student at Ohio State University that a friend suggested he take a course in visual communications. Soon he was devouring European design magazines in the university library. "It was startlingly new," says Jay, and he knew he was finally in his element. Although his new calling was initially a tough sell with his (eventually supportive) parents, Jay graduated from OSU in 1971 with a visual communications degree.
...
Jay is continually actualizing those lessons in his work. In October 2009 Studio J organized an exhibition of contemporary Chinese design, "The Jelly Generation," in the Old Town neighborhood. And in late 2009 he and hotelier Alex Calderwood co-edited and creative-directed an issue of Arkitip magazine celebrating, of all things, great collaborations.
How does he sustain all of this constant self-reinvention? "It's still fun. That's why I work so hard," says Jay.

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Jay

Support Jay
Infodrive India Pvt Ltd

Daniel Jay
BR Testing Ltd

James Jay
Bourbon Orleans Hotel

Richard Jay
American Beryllium Corp

Rob Jay
Operations

City Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

People Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Company Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory