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2016-07-09T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong James Tew?

Dr. James E. Tew

Position In Spring Management

Honey Bees

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Honey Bees

Background Information

Employment History

Chief Executive Officer

iVendi Limited

The OH State University , Wooster , Ohio

Chief Executive Officer

Fortuitus Ltd

Owner

One Tew Bee, LLC

Managing Director

Codeweavers Ltd

Affiliations

Professor of Entomology
The Ohio State University

Consulting Professor (AL Cooperative Extension System)
Auburn University

Education

Ph.D.

University of Maryland

Web References (181 Total References)


Approved Classes 2015 ยป Ohio State Beekeepers Association

www.ohiostatebeekeepers.org [cached]

Dr. Jim Tew

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Dr. Jim Tew
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Dr. Jim Tew
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Dr. Jim Tew
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Dr. Jim Tew Spring Management of Honey Bees
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Dr. Jim Tew Swarm Behavior & Management
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Dr. Jim Tew
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Dr. Jim Tew


Here, Dr. James Tew works in ...

wosu.org [cached]

Here, Dr. James Tew works in the Honey Bee Laboratory


They're generalists, which means they'll ...

www.kansascity.com [cached]

They're generalists, which means they'll pollinate a wide variety of crops throughout the growing season, said James Tew, an entomologist who heads the Honey Bee Laboratory at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster Township.They're "good at a lot of things but not great at anything," Tew said.Honeybees are also loyal to the plants they feed on, and that makes them valuable to farmers and orchard owners, said Kim Flottum, editor of the Medina-based Bee Culture magazine and author of several beekeeping guides.Flottum refers to that loyalty as flower fidelity.

...
That's a big part of the reason threats to their health are troubling to experts such as Tew and Flottum.A combination of factors has caused the honeybee population to decline in the last 50 years or so.One threat comes from varroa and tracheal mites, two parasites that can kill honeybees and decimate colonies.
...
An unusually cold or wet growing season or a harsh winter can devastate colonies, Tew and Flottum said.Humans have played a role in their decline, too.
...
Flottum said the colonists brought them here in the 1600s for their ability to pollinate the apple trees they also brought; their honey, which the colonists used as a sweetener; and their wax, used to make candles for light.For centuries their numbers expanded, but since the late 1950s they've steadily declined, Tew said.
...
And by buying local honey and otherwise supporting beekeepers, people make it easier for those keepers to stay in business and continue to provide the human intervention that honeybees depend on.Entomologist Tew is hopeful that over time, natural selection will result in stronger bees and less-threatening mites. After all, if the bees die off, their parasites will, too, he noted.But until then, the honeybees need help to survive, the experts say. And we're the ones who need to give it.COLLECTING SWARMSHoneybee swarms can be troubling for homeowners, but for beekeepers, they're the fodder for new hives.A swarm occurs in spring when a queen leaves the hive as her successor is being produced, taking a good portion of the workers with her.
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Bee expert Kim Flottum advocates repealing laws like Akron, Ohio's that bar beekeepers.Sources: The Pollinator Partnership, entomologist James Tew, Bee Culture Editor Kim Flottum, beekeeper Dan Kaminski.
...
They're generalists, which means they'll pollinate a wide variety of crops throughout the growing season, said James Tew, an entomologist who heads the Honey Bee Laboratory at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster Township.
...
That's a big part of the reason threats to their health are troubling to experts such as Tew and Flottum.
...
An unusually cold or wet growing season or a harsh winter can devastate colonies, Tew and Flottum said.
...
For centuries their numbers expanded, but since the late 1950s they've steadily declined, Tew said.
...
Honeybees in the wild are unlikely to survive long, Tew said.
...
Entomologist Tew is hopeful that over time, natural selection will result in stronger bees and less-threatening mites. After all, if the bees die off, their parasites will, too, he noted.
...
Sources: The Pollinator Partnership, entomologist James Tew, Bee Culture Editor Kim Flottum, beekeeper Dan Kaminski.


They're generalists, which means they'll ...

www.kansascity.com [cached]

They're generalists, which means they'll pollinate a wide variety of crops throughout the growing season, said James Tew, an entomologist who heads the Honey Bee Laboratory at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster Township.They're "good at a lot of things but not great at anything," Tew said.Honeybees are also loyal to the plants they feed on, and that makes them valuable to farmers and orchard owners, said Kim Flottum, editor of the Medina-based Bee Culture magazine and author of several beekeeping guides.Flottum refers to that loyalty as flower fidelity.

...
That's a big part of the reason threats to their health are troubling to experts such as Tew and Flottum.A combination of factors has caused the honeybee population to decline in the last 50 years or so.One threat comes from varroa and tracheal mites, two parasites that can kill honeybees and decimate colonies.
...
An unusually cold or wet growing season or a harsh winter can devastate colonies, Tew and Flottum said.Humans have played a role in their decline, too.
...
Flottum said the colonists brought them here in the 1600s for their ability to pollinate the apple trees they also brought; their honey, which the colonists used as a sweetener; and their wax, used to make candles for light.For centuries their numbers expanded, but since the late 1950s they've steadily declined, Tew said.
...
And by buying local honey and otherwise supporting beekeepers, people make it easier for those keepers to stay in business and continue to provide the human intervention that honeybees depend on.Entomologist Tew is hopeful that over time, natural selection will result in stronger bees and less-threatening mites. After all, if the bees die off, their parasites will, too, he noted.But until then, the honeybees need help to survive, the experts say. And we're the ones who need to give it.COLLECTING SWARMSHoneybee swarms can be troubling for homeowners, but for beekeepers, they're the fodder for new hives.A swarm occurs in spring when a queen leaves the hive as her successor is being produced, taking a good portion of the workers with her.
...
Bee expert Kim Flottum advocates repealing laws like Akron, Ohio's that bar beekeepers.Sources: The Pollinator Partnership, entomologist James Tew, Bee Culture Editor Kim Flottum, beekeeper Dan Kaminski.
...
They're generalists, which means they'll pollinate a wide variety of crops throughout the growing season, said James Tew, an entomologist who heads the Honey Bee Laboratory at Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster Township.
...
That's a big part of the reason threats to their health are troubling to experts such as Tew and Flottum.
...
An unusually cold or wet growing season or a harsh winter can devastate colonies, Tew and Flottum said.
...
For centuries their numbers expanded, but since the late 1950s they've steadily declined, Tew said.
...
Honeybees in the wild are unlikely to survive long, Tew said.
...
Entomologist Tew is hopeful that over time, natural selection will result in stronger bees and less-threatening mites. After all, if the bees die off, their parasites will, too, he noted.
...
Sources: The Pollinator Partnership, entomologist James Tew, Bee Culture Editor Kim Flottum, beekeeper Dan Kaminski.


Here, Dr. James Tew works in ...

www.wosu.org [cached]

Here, Dr. James Tew works in the Honey Bee Laboratory

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