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James A. Spudich

President

American Society for Cell Biology

HQ Phone:  (301) 347-9300

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

American Society for Cell Biology

8120 Woodmont Avenue

Bethesda, Maryland,20814

United States

Company Description

ASCB (www.ascb.org) is an international community of biologists dedicated to advancing scientific discovery, advocating sound research policies, improving education, promoting professional development and increasing diversity in the scientific workforce. ASCB ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Professor of Biochemistry

Stanford Alumni Association


Director of Bio-X Program

Cytokinetics Inc


Professor

University of California , San Francisco


Affiliations

National Academy of Sciences

Elected Member


American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Elected Member


Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

Visiting Faculty Member At the National Center for Biological Sciences


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Elected Member


MyoKardia Inc

Founder


Searle Scholars

Board Member


Cytokinetics , Incorporated

Founder


Bio.com

Board Member


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Fellow


BIO-X

Chair, Executive Committee


Education

B.S.

Chemistry

University of Illinois


M.S.


Ph.D.


Ph.D.

Opening Remarks Stanford University School of Medicine


Web References(110 Total References)


MyoKardia

www.myokardia.com [cached]

James A. Spudich, Ph.D.
James Spudich serves as the Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease in the Department of Biochemistry at Stanford University. Over the last 35 years, Dr. Spudich and scientists in his lab have used an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to elucidate the molecular basis of energy transduction by the myosin family of molecular motors. Dr. Spudich also serves as a visiting faculty member at the National Center for Biological Sciences of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bangalore, India. Dr. Spudich is a co-founder and former director of Cytokinetics and the Stanford University Bio-X program. He currently serves as the chair of the International Affairs Committee for the American Society for Cell Biology, and has previously served as president of the organization. Dr. Spudich has been recognized with numerous honors for his achievements in the field, including the American Heart Association Basic Research Prize and the 2012 Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has authored more than 190 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Spudich received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University. He completed his postdoctoral work in genetics and structural biology at Stanford University and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.


» ASCB Chemistry: Reactions of a Proud Catalyst

www.ascb.org [cached]

In 2012, the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research went to ASCB members Ron Vale, Jim Spudich, and Mike Sheetz.


MyoKardia

www.myokardia.com [cached]

James A. Spudich, Ph.D.
James Spudich, Ph.D., serves as the Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease in the Department of Biochemistry at Stanford University. Over the last 35 years, Dr. Spudich and scientists in his lab have used an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to elucidate the molecular basis of energy transduction by the myosin family of molecular motors. Dr. Spudich also serves as a visiting faculty member at the National Center for Biological Sciences of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bangalore, India. Dr. Spudich is a co-founder and former director of Cytokinetics and the Stanford University Bio-X program. He currently serves as the chair of the International Affairs Committee for the American Society for Cell Biology, and has previously served as president of the organization. Dr. Spudich has been recognized with numerous honors for his achievements in the field, including the American Heart Association Basic Research Prize and the 2012 Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has authored more than 190 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Spudich holds a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University. He completed his postdoctoral work in genetics and structural biology at Stanford University and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.


MyoKardia

www.myokardia.com [cached]

James A. Spudich, Ph.D.
James Spudich, Ph.D., serves as the Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease in the Department of Biochemistry at Stanford University. Over the last 35 years, Dr. Spudich and scientists in his lab have used an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to elucidate the molecular basis of energy transduction by the myosin family of molecular motors. Dr. Spudich also serves as a visiting faculty member at the National Center for Biological Sciences of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bangalore, India. Dr. Spudich is a co-founder and former director of Cytokinetics and the Stanford University Bio-X program. He currently serves as the chair of the International Affairs Committee for the American Society for Cell Biology, and has previously served as president of the organization. Dr. Spudich has been recognized with numerous honors for his achievements in the field, including the American Heart Association Basic Research Prize and the 2012 Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has authored more than 190 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Spudich holds a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University. He completed his postdoctoral work in genetics and structural biology at Stanford University and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.


www.croatia.org

> Home > Science > James Spudich American scientist of Croatian roots recipient of the Lasker Award for biochemistry
> Home > People > James Spudich American scientist of Croatian roots recipient of the Lasker Award for biochemistry > Home > Education > James Spudich American scientist of Croatian roots recipient of the Lasker Award for biochemistry James Spudich American scientist of Croatian roots recipient of the Lasker Award for biochemistry Trailblazing investigations of Dr. Spudich of the molecular motors that drive our skeletal muscle contractions and heartbeats Dr. James Spudich, professor of cardiovascular disease at Stanford University, USA Lasker Award goes to biochemist James Spudich James Spudich's research helps to explain the molecular activity that enables heartbeats, makes muscles contract and powers immune cells. Stanford biochemist James Spudich, PhD, has been flying small planes as a hobby since 1975. At his Pacific Ocean vacation home there's a private runway within walking distance from his cottage. But what's put him in the pilot seat with respect to his professional career is his consistent ability to develop ever-more-precise ways of measuring molecular movements. Spudich, the Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease at the Stanford University School of Medicine, will receive the 2012 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for his trailblazing investigations of the molecular motors that drive our skeletal muscle contractions and heartbeats, enable our cells to divide, and power patrolling immune cells through our tissues. The prize, sponsored by the New York City-based Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, carries an honorarium of $250,000, which Spudich will share with two other researchers: biologist Michael Sheetz, PhD, of Columbia University, and cellular and molecular pharmacologist Ronald Vale, PhD, of the University of California-San Francisco. Spudich served as the program's first director. Colleagues hailed Spudich as not only a superb scientist but a terrific person endowed with modesty, leadership, inspirational mentoring and vision. Asked how he felt about the award, he replied, "So many other people at Stanford alone could have received this recognition." Spudich is an avid pilot and regularly flies a Trinidad plane to his vacation home in Sea Ranch, Calif. "Jim Spudich's work underscores the importance of investing in basic research as a means to understanding and improving the human condition," said Philip Pizzo, MD, dean of the School of Medicine. Thanks to the work of Spudich, Sheetz, Vale and others whose careers have often intersected, we now know how they work. As Spudich showed, the molecular machinery that makes our muscles contract relies only on two key substances - an ATP-dependent "motor" protein called myosin and a structural protein called actin that assembles into long filaments, which act as roads along which the myosin motor moves. In order to function properly, said Spudich, each cell type - nerve, liver, skin and so forth - has its own "city plan" (its cytoskeleton) to help molecular motors move the right substances along its actin or similar thoroughfares so those substances get to the right place at the right time. In a muscle, actin filaments are mostly aligned, so mass movements of myosin molecules along them causes an entire tissue to contract. Spudich was born at the tail end of the Great Depression in Benld, Ill., a coal-mining town. His early fascination with chemistry - at the age of 6 he acquired his first in a series of progressively more advanced chemistry sets - foreshadowed his scientific ambition. Recognizing this, his parents cleared the pantry of their modest home to create a laboratory space for his pursuits. By his teen years, Spudich's prowess had progressed to the point where he succeeded in triggering a three-engine fire alarm. "My brother John and I set off an explosion in a drainage ditch that looked a little like a mushroom cloud from a small A-bomb," he recalled with some amusement. In 1960, as a sophomore majoring in chemistry at the University of Illinois at Champagne-Urbana, Spudich met a young biochemistry faculty member, J. Woodland Hastings, PhD, in a chance encounter. Hastings was trying to determine how some phosphorescing plankton convert ATP's chemical energy to light. The two bonded immediately, and Spudich signed on to Hastings' bioluminescence-focused lab. Hastings also hired Spudich to be his lab assistant in the legendary summer physiology course Hastings headed at the Marine Biology Lab in Woods Hole, Mass. "There were no undergraduates taking that course. It was a tough blend of biochemistry, physical chemistry and other hard sciences with maybe 10 MDs, 10 PhDs and 10 graduate students in it," recalled Hastings, now the Paul C. Mangelsdorf Research Professor of Natural Science in Harvard University's Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. "But Jim was going around helping them all get their experiments going. More significant, it was there that Spudich met his wife of 48 years, Annamma, then a graduate student and now a scientist and scholar in her own right. Huxley is "the father of the field of molecular motors," said Spudich. After six years at UCSF, Spudich returned in 1977 to Stanford as a professor of structural biology, chairing that department from 1979 to 1984. In 1992 he switched to the Department of Biochemistry, which he chaired from 1994 to 1998. In 1982, he and co-prize winner Sheetz performed an experiment that combined disciplines ranging from microbiology to biophysics. To show for the first time that pure actin is, by itself, enough to support myosin movement at physiologically relevant speeds, Spudich and one of his graduate students subsequently performed analogous experiments using a scaffold of identically oriented filaments of purified actin, ruling out any necessary participation by other components of Nitella's membrane. But observing mass motions of myosin along actin filaments wasn't enough to satisfy Spudich, who wanted to measure the exact amount of energy consumed in each forward ratcheting step of myosin versus the actin filament, as well as the size of that step. Spudich reciprocated by providing Chu's students with space in the Department of Biochemistry so they could learn to manipulate DNA and become acquainted with biology in general. In 1997, Chu and Spudich approached Rice to suggest that these interdisciplinary exchanges should be encouraged by the creation of an environment dedicated to them. Having validated the model for molecular motors, Spudich is now focusing on applications of that model. Cytokinetics, a biotechnology company he co-founded in 1998, is conducting clinical tests of heart-failure drugs that work by increasing myosin's contractile force in that organ. Another Cytokinetics drug in clinical trials is designed to strengthen skeletal muscle. This could help patients with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and, Spudich suggests, perhaps address the frailty of old age. "It would be great if a small-molecule drug that bound to skeletal-muscle myosin could strengthen muscles with minimal side effects and let you get out of a chair, or walk down the street," he said. As for Spudich, he'd rather fly. "I find flying a wonderful way to clear my head," he said. An enthusiastic aviator since 1975, he wrote a book in 2004 about flying, called Piloting with Confidence. But he has soared even higher on the wings of science. Spudich has authored hundreds of peer-reviewed papers and served as president of the American Society for Cell Biology. He is a recipient of the Guggenheim award, fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and member of the National Academy of Sciences. Spudich's wife, two daughters, two sons-in-law and five grandchildren ages 4-12 will join him for the Sept. 21 ceremony in New York where he and his two co-honorees will receive the award, which was first given in 1945. Source med.stanford.edu Recipients of the 2012 Lasker Prize: Professors Michaels Sheetz, Ronald Vale and James Spudich. The Basic Medical Research Award will be shared by three scientists: Michael P. Sheetz, a professor of biology at Columbia; James A. Spudich, professor of biochemistry at Stanford; and Ronald D. Vale, a professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Spudich, who collaborated with Dr.


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