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2015-10-04T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong James Gardner?

Dr. James Gardner E.

Graduate Researcher

University of Texas at Austin

HQ Phone: (512) 471-3434

Email: g***@***.edu

University of Texas at Austin

1 University Station B6600

Austin, Texas 78712

United States

Company Description

The University of Texas at Austin, the largest component of The University of Texas System, is a major research university and home to more than 48,000 students, 2,700 faculty and 17,000 staff members. From teaching and research to public service, the uni ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Research Associate
Rochester Institute of Technology

REU Intern
Cornell University @ Arecibo Observatory

Research Professor
University of Texas

Associate Editor
American Geophysical Union

Associate Professor
University of Texas Department of Geological Sciences

Education

B.S.

Southern Methodist University

M.A.
Geology
Washington University

Ph.D.

University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

Web References (36 Total References)


"The real trick for an ash ...

www.sciencenews.org [cached]

"The real trick for an ash plume is to incorporate enough air to become buoyant before it loses its upward momentum and collapses," says James E. Gardner, a geologist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Now, for the first time, recent analyses of images captured that day provide vital clues about what happens inside a volcano's thick ash plume, he and colleague Benjamin J. Andrews report in the October 2009 Geology.
Although the May 18 eruption is one of the best documented eruptions in history, scientists don't have images showing the ash plume's transition, says Gardner. So, he notes, it's not possible to discern how quickly that transition took place or whether the plume displayed advance warning of its impending collapse.
It's tantalizing to think that scientists could spot early indications that a plume was on the verge of falling back to Earth, says Gardner. And even though data from Mount St. Helens can't answer that question, he notes, his team's findings nearly 30 years after the explosion open up new avenues for studies of future eruptions.


"The real trick for an ash ...

www.sciencenews.org [cached]

"The real trick for an ash plume is to incorporate enough air to become buoyant before it loses its upward momentum and collapses," says James E. Gardner, a geologist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Now, for the first time, recent analyses of images captured that day provide vital clues about what happens inside a volcano's thick ash plume, he and colleague Benjamin J. Andrews report in the October 2009 Geology.
Although the May 18 eruption is one of the best documented eruptions in history, scientists don't have images showing the ash plume's transition, says Gardner. So, he notes, it's not possible to discern how quickly that transition took place or whether the plume displayed advance warning of its impending collapse.
It's tantalizing to think that scientists could spot early indications that a plume was on the verge of falling back to Earth, says Gardner. And even though data from Mount St. Helens can't answer that question, he notes, his team's findings nearly 30 years after the explosion open up new avenues for studies of future eruptions.


"The real trick for an ash ...

www.sciencenews.org [cached]

"The real trick for an ash plume is to incorporate enough air to become buoyant before it loses its upward momentum and collapses," says James E. Gardner, a geologist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Now, for the first time, recent analyses of images captured that day provide vital clues about what happens inside a volcano's thick ash plume, he and colleague Benjamin J. Andrews report in the October 2009 Geology.
Although the May 18 eruption is one of the best documented eruptions in history, scientists don't have images showing the ash plume's transition, says Gardner. So, he notes, it's not possible to discern how quickly that transition took place or whether the plume displayed advance warning of its impending collapse.
It's tantalizing to think that scientists could spot early indications that a plume was on the verge of falling back to Earth, says Gardner. And even though data from Mount St. Helens can't answer that question, he notes, his team's findings nearly 30 years after the explosion open up new avenues for studies of future eruptions.


"The real trick for an ash ...

www.sciencenews.org [cached]

"The real trick for an ash plume is to incorporate enough air to become buoyant before it loses its upward momentum and collapses," says James E. Gardner, a geologist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Now, for the first time, recent analyses of images captured that day provide vital clues about what happens inside a volcano's thick ash plume, he and colleague Benjamin J. Andrews report in the October 2009 Geology.
Although the May 18 eruption is one of the best documented eruptions in history, scientists don't have images showing the ash plume's transition, says Gardner. So, he notes, it's not possible to discern how quickly that transition took place or whether the plume displayed advance warning of its impending collapse.
It's tantalizing to think that scientists could spot early indications that a plume was on the verge of falling back to Earth, says Gardner. And even though data from Mount St. Helens can't answer that question, he notes, his team's findings nearly 30 years after the explosion open up new avenues for studies of future eruptions.


"The real trick for an ash ...

www.sciencenews.org [cached]

"The real trick for an ash plume is to incorporate enough air to become buoyant before it loses its upward momentum and collapses," says James E. Gardner, a geologist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Now, for the first time, recent analyses of images captured that day provide vital clues about what happens inside a volcano's thick ash plume, he and colleague Benjamin J. Andrews report in the October 2009 Geology.
Although the May 18 eruption is one of the best documented eruptions in history, scientists don't have images showing the ash plume's transition, says Gardner. So, he notes, it's not possible to discern how quickly that transition took place or whether the plume displayed advance warning of its impending collapse.
It's tantalizing to think that scientists could spot early indications that a plume was on the verge of falling back to Earth, says Gardner. And even though data from Mount St. Helens can't answer that question, he notes, his team's findings nearly 30 years after the explosion open up new avenues for studies of future eruptions.

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