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Jackie Diels

Facial Retraining Specialist, Occupational Therapist

UW Health

HQ Phone:  (608) 263-6400

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

UW Health

600 Highland Ave.

Madison, Wisconsin,53792

United States

Company Description

UW Health is the integrated health system of the University of Wisconsin-Madison serving more than 600,000 patients each year in the Upper Midwest and beyond with 1,400 physicians and 16,500 staff at six hospitals and 80 outpatient sites. UW Health is governed... more

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Web References(26 Total References)


UW Children's Hospital

www.uwchildrenshospital.org [cached]

MADISON - Jackie Diels, OT, a facial rehabilitation specialist at UW Health's Research Park Rehabilitation Clinic, is the most prominent and experienced practitioner of facial retraining in the United States.She has been honing her skills for nearly 20 years, sees patients from all over the world and has trained the vast majority of therapists who offer similar services.But her profile is relatively low.Why?"In the scheme of the medical community, there isn't as much facial paralysis as there is stroke or hip fractures," says Diels."The population is really small."Diels sees patients with partial facial paralysis, which most often stems from one of two sources.The first, Bell's Palsy, a disorder caused by damage to the seventh cranial nerve, affects two in 10,000 people, according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates."It's very caved-in looking," Diels explains."A lot of people have trouble speaking, eating and drinking."Facial paralysis isn't life-threatening, but Diels believes her services provide a benefit that cannot be measured with an EKG or blood pressure cuff.To Diels, working through the difficulty of partial facial paralysis isn't merely an exercise in vanity.It's about restoring non-verbal communication."They lose that," she says.For that reason, Diels asks her patients to wait three months before coming to her.For those who notice no improvement in those three months, Diels has devised a three-day therapy regimen that re-coordinates the facial muscles so they function the way they are supposed to.These patients often come to her with a variety of facial tics and twitches, because as the seventh cranial nerve heals, it often compels muscles it didn't originally trigger for a particular expression."They get uncoordinated facial movement," says Diels.These muscles, says Diels, have only one purpose - moving the skin of the face - and by identifying each muscle's responsibility, patients can learn how to focus on problem areas.Patients are released from the day one session with a series of exercises designed to loosen the muscles of the face, which they practice that evening.Returning the second day, Diels conducts a review session and they continue with the exercises."It varies by individual," Diels says.It's automatic," Diels says."But we do have the capability of making it do certain things if we think about it."And once the patients start catching on, the results are quickly evident."Many times they'll start making improvements while they're here in the clinic.It's very motivational," Diels says.The third and final day of therapy is an extensive review of the previous two days' activities.Most patients will have to continue with the exercises for as many as 18 months to three years, so Diels wants them to attain a certain level of comfort and familiarity."We talk about taking those movement patterns and making a cohesive plan that they can do at home," she says."When they leave here by the end of that third day, they feel confident in what they're supposed to be doing."The resultsDiels cannot guarantee a 100 percent recovery, a fact she makes clear to all of her patients."Nobody gets back to perfect," she says.Diels says that many of her patients say they don't know why they've come to her, because they've never thought of themselves as the kind of people who worry about how they look.Diels quickly corrects them, saying what they are feeling isn't simply excessive pride or self-importance."It's your face," she says.


UW Health

www.uwhealth.org [cached]

MADISON - Jackie Diels, OT, a facial rehabilitation specialist at UW Health's Research Park Rehabilitation Clinic, is the most prominent and experienced practitioner of facial retraining in the United States.She has been honing her skills for nearly 20 years, sees patients from all over the world and has trained the vast majority of therapists who offer similar services.But her profile is relatively low.Why?"In the scheme of the medical community, there isn't as much facial paralysis as there is stroke or hip fractures," says Diels."The population is really small."Diels sees patients with partial facial paralysis, which most often stems from one of two sources.The first, Bell's Palsy, a disorder caused by damage to the seventh cranial nerve, affects two in 10,000 people, according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates."It's very caved-in looking," Diels explains."A lot of people have trouble speaking, eating and drinking."Facial paralysis isn't life-threatening, but Diels believes her services provide a benefit that cannot be measured with an EKG or blood pressure cuff.To Diels, working through the difficulty of partial facial paralysis isn't merely an exercise in vanity.It's about restoring non-verbal communication."They lose that," she says.For that reason, Diels asks her patients to wait three months before coming to her.For those who notice no improvement in those three months, Diels has devised a three-day therapy regimen that re-coordinates the facial muscles so they function the way they are supposed to.These patients often come to her with a variety of facial tics and twitches, because as the seventh cranial nerve heals, it often compels muscles it didn't originally trigger for a particular expression."They get uncoordinated facial movement," says Diels.These muscles, says Diels, have only one purpose - moving the skin of the face - and by identifying each muscle's responsibility, patients can learn how to focus on problem areas.Patients are released from the day one session with a series of exercises designed to loosen the muscles of the face, which they practice that evening.Returning the second day, Diels conducts a review session and they continue with the exercises."It varies by individual," Diels says.It's automatic," Diels says."But we do have the capability of making it do certain things if we think about it."And once the patients start catching on, the results are quickly evident."Many times they'll start making improvements while they're here in the clinic.It's very motivational," Diels says.The third and final day of therapy is an extensive review of the previous two days' activities.Most patients will have to continue with the exercises for as many as 18 months to three years, so Diels wants them to attain a certain level of comfort and familiarity."We talk about taking those movement patterns and making a cohesive plan that they can do at home," she says."When they leave here by the end of that third day, they feel confident in what they're supposed to be doing."The resultsDiels cannot guarantee a 100 percent recovery, a fact she makes clear to all of her patients."Nobody gets back to perfect," she says.Diels says that many of her patients say they don't know why they've come to her, because they've never thought of themselves as the kind of people who worry about how they look.Diels quickly corrects them, saying what they are feeling isn't simply excessive pride or self-importance."It's your face," she says.


Jackie Diels Facial Retraining :: Patients – Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining

www.facialretraining.com [cached]

Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining
Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining About Jackie Diels Jackie Diels is regarded as a leading authority on facial neuromuscular retraining (NMR), a non-surgical therapeutic approach to the treatment of facial paralysis, paresis and synkinesis. Jackie Diels' practice is dedicated solely to treating people with facial paralysis resulting from acoustic neuroma and other brain tumors, Bell's palsy, traumatic injury and other causes. Additional Information About Jackie Diels


About Jackie Diels – Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining

www.facialretraining.com [cached]

Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining
Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining Jackie Diels, OT :: Facial Retraining About Jackie Diels Jackie Diels, OT Jackie Diels Facial Retraining Jackie Diels is regarded as a leading authority on facial neuromuscular retraining (NMR), a non-surgical therapeutic approach to the treatment of facial paralysis, paresis and synkinesis. Jackie received her degree in occupational therapy at the University of Wisconsin (UW) in 1985. Shortly thereafter she began her work in facial NMR at the UW Hospital and Clinics Neuromuscular Retraining Clinic, under the mentorship of Paul Bach-y-Rita, MD and Richard Balliet, PhD, pioneers in the field of brain plasticity and rehabilitation. Since that time, her practice has be dedicated solely to treating people with facial paralysis resulting from acoustic neuroma and other brain tumors, Bell's palsy, traumatic injury and other causes. In addition to private practice, Ms. Diels continues part-time clinic practice and staffs a multidisciplinary Facial Nerve Clinic. Ms. Diels consults extensively with physicians and therapists world-wide with particular emphasis on developing treatment strategies for synkinesis. Jackie lectures frequently to patient support groups, physicians and therapists and has trained therapists in the U.S. and abroad. She is actively involved in ongoing research and has authored numerous book chapters and articles in the field of facial rehabilitation. Ms. Diels is a founding member and past secretary of the Sir Charles Bell Society and currently serves on the medical advisory boards of the American Acoustic Neuroma Association, the Bell's Palsy Information Site and the Facial Paralysis Foundation. About Jackie Diels Jackie Diels is regarded as a leading authority on facial neuromuscular retraining (NMR), a non-surgical therapeutic approach to the treatment of facial paralysis, paresis and synkinesis. Jackie Diels' practice is dedicated solely to treating people with facial paralysis resulting from acoustic neuroma and other brain tumors, Bell's palsy, traumatic injury and other causes. Additional Information About Jackie Diels


The Facial Paralysis Institute Treatment Team

www.facialparalysisinstitute.com [cached]

Jacqueline Diels OT
Jacqueline Diels OT Jacqueline Diels OT Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Specialist at the Facial Paralysis Institute Jacqueline Diels is one of the world's leading authorities on facial neuromuscular retraining (NMR), a non-surgical therapeutic approach to the treatment of facial paralysis, paresis and synkinesis. She received her degree in occupational therapy at the University of Wisconsin in 1985. Jacqueline currently serves on the medical advisory boards of the American Acoustic Neuroma Association and the Bells Palsy Information Site. She is a founding member and past secretary of the Sir Charles Bell Society. More than a job or profession, Jackie regards her work as a "calling". Her favorite, most challenging and rewarding work is one-on-one with clients. She has personally treated over 10,000 individuals (with diagnoses including acoustic neuroma and other brain tumors, Bell's Palsy, traumatic injury and other causes). Her mission: to empower patients and medical professionals to improve facial paralysis and quality of life through insight, education and training. Jacqueline Diels OT


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