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Wrong John Adamchik?

John Adamchik A. P.E.

Vice President Operation

ENGlobal Corporation

Direct Phone: (281) ***-****       

Email: j***@***.com

ENGlobal Corporation

654 N. Sam Houston Pkwy E Suite 400

Houston, Texas 77060

United States

Company Description

ENGlobal Corporation (ENGlobal) is a provider of engineering and professional services principally to the energy sector. As of December 31, 2007, ENGlobal operated through four business segments: Engineering, Construction, Automation and Land. The Enginee... more

Find other employees at this company (1,252)

Background Information

Employment History

Project Consultant

The Williams Companies Inc

Senior Vice President Operation

AMEC plc

Affiliations

Board Member
Association of Washington Business

Project Director
BFGoodrich Aerospace

Web References (11 Total References)


Spokane Journal of Business - The Business Newspaper For The Inland Northwest

www.spokanejournal.com [cached]

The company expects to begin work next month on a planned expansion of its manufacturing facility here that will more than double the size of the complex to 140,000 square feet of floor space and will allow the plant to expand-as planned-the scope of work that it currently handles, says John A. Adamchik, director of operations here.That expansion, which likely will take about two years to build, is the second phase of the company's initial plans here.Together, the two phases will cost about $66.5 million.

The plant, which currently employs just 38 people, is expected to employ 250 workers by 2005."That level is dependent on the market, but every indication so far tells us that we'll meet our target," Adamchik says.
BFGoodrich expects to employ more than 50 workers here by the end of this year.He says that the company has been working with the Washington state Job Service program and has had "no problem" finding workers here.
To hit its targeted employment levels, though, Adamchik says that demand for carbon brakes must continue to rise, as the company expects.
"We don't believe in hiring a bunch of people and then laying them off," Adamchik says.He doesn't believe that the company's Pueblo, Colo., plant has laid off an employee in its 12-year history.
Product demand levels that the company has forecasted look as though they will be reached, because new commercial aircraft with carbon brakes-as opposed to steel brakes-are continually being produced, Adamchik says.Also, the life of a commercial aircraft is between 25 and 30 years, which means that the carbon brakes on such aircraft will need periodic replacements.He says the brake-replacement cycle on aircraft varies depending on the type of aircraft and the number of landings that a plane performs.
BFGoodrich Co., as a whole, supplied over half of all the brakes needed for new commercial aircraft in 1999, Adamchik says.
...
Adamchik says that it currently takes about six months for a carbon disk to make its way through the manufacturing process.
Once the disks have been machined and sanded here, they are sent to another BFGoodrich facility for final machining.They then are assembled into carbon brakes and shipped to customers.Adamchik says BFGoodrich supplies aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing Co., Airbus Industrie, and Embraer, as well as aircraft operators, such as American Airlines and Federal Express.
As part of the expansion project here, a textile building will be added to the campus, and a textile line will be installed in that building to enable the plant to weave the fiber from raw material into the sheets.
The BFGoodrich campus here currently includes three buildings-an administrative building, a boiler building that contains all of the utilities used by the plant, and a building that houses six furnaces, a computerized control room, and a machine shop.
Adamchik says the textile building wasn't constructed earlier because the Pueblo plant had adequate capacity to weave and cut material for the Spokane plant.
...
Lydig also handled construction of the initial 50,000-square-foot plant, which was completed in 10 months, Adamchik says.He says that a contract for site excavation for the plant expansion should be awarded by the middle of next month, and construction should get under way by the end of this year.
"At this point, Phase II isn't scheduled to be on a fast track like Phase I. For Phase I, we just needed to get up and be operational as soon as we could to help support the increased demand for carbon disks," Adamchik says.
Search our top story archive (since February 1997)


Spokane Journal of Business - The Business Newspaper For The Inland Northwest

www.spokanejournal.com [cached]

The company expects to begin work next month on a planned expansion of its manufacturing facility here that will more than double the size of the complex to 140,000 square feet of floor space and will allow the plant to expand-as planned-the scope of work that it currently handles, says John A. Adamchik, director of operations here.That expansion, which likely will take about two years to build, is the second phase of the company's initial plans here.Together, the two phases will cost about $66.5 million.

The plant, which currently employs just 38 people, is expected to employ 250 workers by 2005."That level is dependent on the market, but every indication so far tells us that we'll meet our target," Adamchik says.
BFGoodrich expects to employ more than 50 workers here by the end of this year.He says that the company has been working with the Washington state Job Service program and has had "no problem" finding workers here.
To hit its targeted employment levels, though, Adamchik says that demand for carbon brakes must continue to rise, as the company expects.
"We don't believe in hiring a bunch of people and then laying them off," Adamchik says.He doesn't believe that the company's Pueblo, Colo., plant has laid off an employee in its 12-year history.
Product demand levels that the company has forecasted look as though they will be reached, because new commercial aircraft with carbon brakes-as opposed to steel brakes-are continually being produced, Adamchik says.Also, the life of a commercial aircraft is between 25 and 30 years, which means that the carbon brakes on such aircraft will need periodic replacements.He says the brake-replacement cycle on aircraft varies depending on the type of aircraft and the number of landings that a plane performs.
BFGoodrich Co., as a whole, supplied over half of all the brakes needed for new commercial aircraft in 1999, Adamchik says.
...
Adamchik says that it currently takes about six months for a carbon disk to make its way through the manufacturing process.
Once the disks have been machined and sanded here, they are sent to another BFGoodrich facility for final machining.They then are assembled into carbon brakes and shipped to customers.Adamchik says BFGoodrich supplies aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing Co., Airbus Industrie, and Embraer, as well as aircraft operators, such as American Airlines and Federal Express.
As part of the expansion project here, a textile building will be added to the campus, and a textile line will be installed in that building to enable the plant to weave the fiber from raw material into the sheets.
The BFGoodrich campus here currently includes three buildings-an administrative building, a boiler building that contains all of the utilities used by the plant, and a building that houses six furnaces, a computerized control room, and a machine shop.
Adamchik says the textile building wasn't constructed earlier because the Pueblo plant had adequate capacity to weave and cut material for the Spokane plant.
...
Lydig also handled construction of the initial 50,000-square-foot plant, which was completed in 10 months, Adamchik says.He says that a contract for site excavation for the plant expansion should be awarded by the middle of next month, and construction should get under way by the end of this year.
"At this point, Phase II isn't scheduled to be on a fast track like Phase I. For Phase I, we just needed to get up and be operational as soon as we could to help support the increased demand for carbon disks," Adamchik says.
Search our top story archive (since February 1997)


AWB Board of Directors

www2.awb.org [cached]

Jack Adamchik, BF Goodrich Aerospace Carbon Products


Spokane Journal of Business - The Business Newspaper For The Inland Northwest

www.spokanejournal.com [cached]

The company expects to begin work next month on a planned expansion of its manufacturing facility here that will more than double the size of the complex to 140,000 square feet of floor space and will allow the plant to expand-as planned-the scope of work that it currently handles, says John A. Adamchik, director of operations here.That expansion, which likely will take about two years to build, is the second phase of the company's initial plans here.Together, the two phases will cost about $66.5 million.

The plant, which currently employs just 38 people, is expected to employ 250 workers by 2005."That level is dependent on the market, but every indication so far tells us that we'll meet our target," Adamchik says.
BFGoodrich expects to employ more than 50 workers here by the end of this year.He says that the company has been working with the Washington state Job Service program and has had "no problem" finding workers here.
To hit its targeted employment levels, though, Adamchik says that demand for carbon brakes must continue to rise, as the company expects.
"We don't believe in hiring a bunch of people and then laying them off," Adamchik says.He doesn't believe that the company's Pueblo, Colo., plant has laid off an employee in its 12-year history.
Product demand levels that the company has forecasted look as though they will be reached, because new commercial aircraft with carbon brakes-as opposed to steel brakes-are continually being produced, Adamchik says.Also, the life of a commercial aircraft is between 25 and 30 years, which means that the carbon brakes on such aircraft will need periodic replacements.He says the brake-replacement cycle on aircraft varies depending on the type of aircraft and the number of landings that a plane performs.
BFGoodrich Co., as a whole, supplied over half of all the brakes needed for new commercial aircraft in 1999, Adamchik says.
...
Adamchik says that it currently takes about six months for a carbon disk to make its way through the manufacturing process.
Once the disks have been machined and sanded here, they are sent to another BFGoodrich facility for final machining.They then are assembled into carbon brakes and shipped to customers.Adamchik says BFGoodrich supplies aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing Co., Airbus Industrie, and Embraer, as well as aircraft operators, such as American Airlines and Federal Express.
As part of the expansion project here, a textile building will be added to the campus, and a textile line will be installed in that building to enable the plant to weave the fiber from raw material into the sheets.
The BFGoodrich campus here currently includes three buildings-an administrative building, a boiler building that contains all of the utilities used by the plant, and a building that houses six furnaces, a computerized control room, and a machine shop.
Adamchik says the textile building wasn't constructed earlier because the Pueblo plant had adequate capacity to weave and cut material for the Spokane plant.
...
Lydig also handled construction of the initial 50,000-square-foot plant, which was completed in 10 months, Adamchik says.He says that a contract for site excavation for the plant expansion should be awarded by the middle of next month, and construction should get under way by the end of this year.
"At this point, Phase II isn't scheduled to be on a fast track like Phase I. For Phase I, we just needed to get up and be operational as soon as we could to help support the increased demand for carbon disks," Adamchik says.
Search our top story archive (since February 1997)


Spokane Journal of Business - The Business Newspaper For The Inland Northwest

www.spokanejournal.com [cached]

The company expects to begin work next month on a planned expansion of its manufacturing facility here that will more than double the size of the complex to 140,000 square feet of floor space and will allow the plant to expand-as planned-the scope of work that it currently handles, says John A. Adamchik, director of operations here.That expansion, which likely will take about two years to build, is the second phase of the company's initial plans here.Together, the two phases will cost about $66.5 million.

The plant, which currently employs just 38 people, is expected to employ 250 workers by 2005."That level is dependent on the market, but every indication so far tells us that we'll meet our target," Adamchik says.
BFGoodrich expects to employ more than 50 workers here by the end of this year.He says that the company has been working with the Washington state Job Service program and has had "no problem" finding workers here.
To hit its targeted employment levels, though, Adamchik says that demand for carbon brakes must continue to rise, as the company expects.
"We don't believe in hiring a bunch of people and then laying them off," Adamchik says.He doesn't believe that the company's Pueblo, Colo., plant has laid off an employee in its 12-year history.
Product demand levels that the company has forecasted look as though they will be reached, because new commercial aircraft with carbon brakes-as opposed to steel brakes-are continually being produced, Adamchik says.Also, the life of a commercial aircraft is between 25 and 30 years, which means that the carbon brakes on such aircraft will need periodic replacements.He says the brake-replacement cycle on aircraft varies depending on the type of aircraft and the number of landings that a plane performs.
BFGoodrich Co., as a whole, supplied over half of all the brakes needed for new commercial aircraft in 1999, Adamchik says.
...
Adamchik says that it currently takes about six months for a carbon disk to make its way through the manufacturing process.
Once the disks have been machined and sanded here, they are sent to another BFGoodrich facility for final machining.They then are assembled into carbon brakes and shipped to customers.Adamchik says BFGoodrich supplies aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing Co., Airbus Industrie, and Embraer, as well as aircraft operators, such as American Airlines and Federal Express.
As part of the expansion project here, a textile building will be added to the campus, and a textile line will be installed in that building to enable the plant to weave the fiber from raw material into the sheets.
The BFGoodrich campus here currently includes three buildings-an administrative building, a boiler building that contains all of the utilities used by the plant, and a building that houses six furnaces, a computerized control room, and a machine shop.
Adamchik says the textile building wasn't constructed earlier because the Pueblo plant had adequate capacity to weave and cut material for the Spokane plant.
...
Lydig also handled construction of the initial 50,000-square-foot plant, which was completed in 10 months, Adamchik says.He says that a contract for site excavation for the plant expansion should be awarded by the middle of next month, and construction should get under way by the end of this year.
"At this point, Phase II isn't scheduled to be on a fast track like Phase I. For Phase I, we just needed to get up and be operational as soon as we could to help support the increased demand for carbon disks," Adamchik says.
Search our top story archive (since February 1997)

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