Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 10/10/11  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. J.O. Eaton

Wrong J.O. Eaton?

Founder

The Eaton Corporation
 
Background

Employment History

  • Assistant General Manager
    Empire Cream Separator Company
  • First Vice President for Finance
    Republic Steel
  • Partner
    Otis and Company
  • Department Manager
    George P. Ide and Co.

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Board Member
    Republic Steel

Education

  • Williams
Web References
Eaton's plant in the ...
www.clevelandbanner.com, 10 Oct 2011 [cached]
Eaton's plant in the Cleveland-Bradley County community, located on Old Tasso Road, was originally constructed in 1977 by Cutler-Hammer, but acquired by Eaton in 1978.
...
The new Cleveland manager emphasized that Eaton has 215 plants around the world and is a multibillion-dollar corporation. He said many people do not understand all the products the company produces.
At the Cleveland facility, Eaton manufactures electrical safety switch boxes.
...
The Eaton Corporation was founded in 1911 by J.O. Eaton, Henning O. Taube and V.V. Torbensen.
...
Cutler-Hammer, like Eaton, was involved primarily in the electric power industry.
Cutler-Hammer had also branched into electronics over the years prior to the acquisition, and Airborne Instruments Laboratory was also acquired in the deal between Cutler-Hammer and Eaton.
The Eaton logo has always centered on the name of one of its founders, J.O. Eaton.
...
Officials emphasized Eaton doesn't make automobiles, trucks or airplanes, but does produce components.
...
Eaton raises more than $15,000 to benefit American Cancer Society | 14 months ago Cleveland Daily Banner Copyright 2011 Cleveland Daily Banner. All rights reserved.
Eaton Corporation
www.iku.com, 28 Jan 2002 [cached]
J.O. EatonPress ReleasesMap & DirectionsComing Attractions: New Product Technologies from Eaton Corporationdownload RealPlayer
...
Eaton is
Eaton is a global $7.3 billion diversified industrial manufacturer that is a leader in fluid power systems; electrical power quality, distribution and control; automotive engine air management and fuel economy; and intelligent truck systems for fuel economy and safety.Eaton has 49,000 employees and sells products in more than 50 countries.
Mission
Producing the highest quality products at costs which make them economically practical in the most competitively priced markets. -- J.O. Eaton, 1911
Values
We achieve our mission through our global commitment to: Customer Satisfaction Profitable Growth Total Quality Leadership
...
Eaton, whose father had an art studio in New York City, was born July 28, 1873 in Yonkers, New York.At birth, he was named Harrison Eaton.His father - named Joseph Oriel Eaton - was a talented portrait painter of the Hudson River School, who painted many of the rich and famous, including Abraham Lincoln and Herman Melville.
During summers, the elder Eaton would return to the family farm at Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he died in 1875.After his death, young Harrison's mother changed his name to Joseph Oriel in memory of her husband.
J.O. Eaton was raised by his mother and grandmother in Cincinnati, where he attended public schools.With the help of a scholarship, he made his way through Williams College in Massachusetts, where he learned to enjoy tennis and other sports.He briefly played professional baseball, and got a broken nose doing so.
One summer he wrote a tennis column for the Cincinnati Enquirer for space rates.His weekly earnings ranged from $5 to $10, and from that brief experience as an intellectual, he determined that he would make his career as a businessman.
He first worked for an uncle in a Cincinnati bank and later tried selling an unfashionable brand of cigarettes for another relative while in New York City.He peddled the cigarettes up and down Broadway one day, without selling a single package, before returning to his room quite discouraged.He took out his samples and began to smoke them, growing sicker with each puff.He finally understood why he couldn't sell them.He threw them away, vowing never again to work for a relative.
After graduating from Williams in 1895, and the brief job with American Express, he enlisted in the Army and served as a private in the 2nd New York Volunteer Infantry during the Spanish-American War.Released from duty, he turned his attention once again to business.He worked for George P. Ide and Co., shirt and collar manufacturers in Troy, New York, and became a department manager.But he secretly cherished a desire to be in business for himself.
In 1903 he moved to Bloomfield, New Jersey to become assistant general manager of the Empire Cream Separator Company.He returned to Troy in 1904 to open his own company, Interstate Shirt and Collar Company, where, he later admitted, he lost his shirttail.
Despite losing money, the return to Troy was auspicious.He made the first of many successful acquisitions after he began courting a young widow named Edith Ide French, the daughter of his former employer, George Ide.He and Edith were married in 1910.
The following year he returned to Bloomfield and, with inventor Viggo V. Torbensen, formed the Torbensen Gear and Axle Company, predecessor of Eaton Corporation.
J.O. Eaton was not a mechanical genius in the mold of Edison or Ford.In fact, he never learned to drive a car.He tried to drive one of the early electric models, rammed it into a wall and never drove again.But he had learned how to run a business.
Torbensen Gear and Axle Company moved to Cleveland in 1914, and Eaton rapidly gained a reputation for financial and administrative ingenuity.When Republic Motor Trucks acquired Torbensen in 1917, Eaton was named first vice president for finance of Republic.After leaving Republic in 1919, he became associated with industrialist Cyrus S. Eaton (no relation) at Otis and Company, a firm of investment bankers headquartered in Cleveland, but with offices in many of the nation's larger cities.From 1921 to 1931, J.O. Eaton was a partner in Otis and Company and involved in many Cleveland business and financial deals.
Cyrus Eaton gained prominence as the founder of several Cleveland corporations, and he attracted widespread public attention as a friend of Russia by promoting East-West trade at a time during the 50s and 60s when it was extremely unpopular to do so.Because of the public recognition of his name, people often assume that he founded Eaton Corporation.In fact, Cyrus Eaton was never associated with the company in any way.
J.O. Eaton did not achieve nationwide name recognition, but was a highly respected figure in industrial circles.On September 11, 1920, Finance and Industry profiled him as follows: "His profound capacity for quick and accurate analysis has given him a reputation for clear-headed thinking, and for coolness in the face of trying events.Business and social acquaintances testify to his unusual ability for striking directly to the heart of a matter, brushing aside extraneous elements having no important bearing."
In the Depression, Otis and Company suffered heavy financial losses and was reorganized.J.O. Eaton and several of the other partners resigned, but still felt obligated personally to pay the debts of the firm.As a result, Eaton lost much of his personal fortune.
Eaton served on the boards of directors of 25 corporations including Republic Steel, National Acme Co., Harnischfeger Corp., Cleveland Tractor Co., Inland Investors and others.An associate once remarked, "J.O. Eaton's presence on the board assures the integrity of the company."
Throughout his career, one of Eaton's responses to adversity was to increase the advertising and promotion of his company's products.To combat the post-World War I depression, he hired the company's first full-time advertising director in 1923.In 1933, with the economy at its lowest point in history, he hired a young man named John W. Hill who had recently established a public relations practice in Cleveland.
...
During the Depression, Eaton started the "Racqueteers," a group of industrialists who were members of the Tavern Club, Cleveland's most exclusive social club.Members wore crimson blazers with an emblem of crossed tennis racquets and martini glasses.His friends in the Tavern Club were vitriolic in their hostility toward the New Deal and Franklin Roosevelt.J.O. Eaton was not, and his feisty retorts often made the conversations acrimonious.Finally, the Club established a firm rule: No one could talk politics two weeks before an election.Apparently, Eaton never acquired the conventional political attitudes of his Tavern Club associates.He voted for Roosevelt four times.
A business associate once asked Eaton if he would consent to be included in a book about great people in industry called, "Small Boys Grown Tall."The book was obviously designed to please the vanity of those included and Eaton wanted no part of it.He returned it with the suggestion that the title be amended to "Small Boys Grown Tall, But Not Broad."
He and Edith traveled to Europe often during the 20s and 30s.He was an enthusiastic art collector, and during the last few years of his life, donated most of his extensive art collection to Williams College.
Eaton was always formal, even with long-time associates.Logan Monroe, who worked with Eaton for 29 years, recalls that there were only a handful of people he ever called by their first name.To the employees, he was always, "Mr.Eaton."His friends most often called him "Joe," and occasionally "J.O."
Eaton had a strong sense of vision.He believed in the infant trucking industry and staked his future on his belief.He learned quickly, after his own company was sold to Republic in 1917, that the quickest way to grow was to acquire other promising companies.
When Eaton died in 1949, at age 75, the company he had started had grown to 11 plants in the
Eaton Corporation
www.vorad.com, 19 Dec 2001 [cached]
J.O. EatonEaton Corporation
...
J.O. Eaton was raised by his mother and grandmother in Cincinnati, where he attended public schools.With the help of a scholarship, he made his way through Williams College in Massachusetts, where he learned to enjoy tennis and other sports.He briefly played professional baseball, and got a broken nose doing so.
One summer he wrote a tennis column for the Cincinnati Enquirer for space rates.His weekly earnings ranged from $5 to $10, and from that brief experience as an intellectual, he determined that he would make his career as a businessman.
He first worked for an uncle in a Cincinnati bank and later tried selling an unfashionable brand of cigarettes for another relative while in New York City.He peddled the cigarettes up and down Broadway one day, without selling a single package, before returning to his room quite discouraged.He took out his samples and began to smoke them, growing sicker with each puff.He finally understood why he couldn't sell them.He threw them away, vowing never again to work for a relative.
After graduating from Williams in 1895, and the brief job with American Express, he enlisted in the Army and served as a private in the 2nd New York Volunteer Infantry during the Spanish-American War.Released from duty, he turned his attention once again to business.He worked for George P. Ide and Co., shirt and collar manufacturers in Troy, New York, and became a department manager.But he secretly cherished a desire to be in business for himself.
In 1903 he moved to Bloomfield, New Jersey to become assistant general manager of the Empire Cream Separator Company.He returned to Troy in 1904 to open his own company, Interstate Shirt and Collar Company, where, he later admitted, he lost his shirttail.
Despite losing money, the return to Troy was auspicious.He made the first of many successful acquisitions after he began courting a young widow named Edith Ide French, the daughter of his former employer, George Ide.He and Edith were married in 1910.
The following year he returned to Bloomfield and, with inventor Viggo V. Torbensen, formed the Torbensen Gear and Axle Company, predecessor of Eaton Corporation.
...
J.O. Eaton was not a mechanical genius in the mold of Edison or Ford.In fact, he never learned to drive a car.He tried to drive one of the early electric models, rammed it into a wall and never drove again.But he had learned how to run a business.
Torbensen Gear and Axle Company moved to Cleveland in 1914, and Eaton rapidly gained a reputation for financial and administrative ingenuity.When Republic Motor Trucks acquired Torbensen in 1917, Eaton was named first vice president for finance of Republic.
...
From 1921 to 1931, J.O. Eaton was a partner in Otis and Company and involved in many Cleveland business and financial deals.
...
J.O. Eaton did not achieve nationwide name recognition, but was a highly respected figure in industrial circles.On September 11, 1920, Finance and Industry profiled him as follows: "His profound capacity for quick and accurate analysis has given him a reputation for clear-headed thinking, and for coolness in the face of trying events.Business and social acquaintances testify to his unusual ability for striking directly to the heart of a matter, brushing aside extraneous elements having no important bearing."
In the Depression, Otis and Company suffered heavy financial losses and was reorganized.J.O. Eaton and several of the other partners resigned, but still felt obligated personally to pay the debts of the firm.As a result, Eaton lost much of his personal fortune.
Eaton served on the boards of directors of 25 corporations including Republic Steel, National Acme Co., Harnischfeger Corp., Cleveland Tractor Co., Inland Investors and others.An associate once remarked, "J.O. Eaton's presence on the board assures the integrity of the company."
Throughout his career, one of Eaton's responses to adversity was to increase the advertising and promotion of his company's products.To combat the post-World War I depression, he hired the company's first full-time advertising director in 1923.In 1933, with the economy at its lowest point in history, he hired a young man named John W. Hill who had recently established a public relations practice in Cleveland.
...
During the Depression, Eaton started the "Racqueteers," a group of industrialists who were members of the Tavern Club, Cleveland's most exclusive social club.Members wore crimson blazers with an emblem of crossed tennis racquets and martini glasses.
...
J.O. Eaton was not, and his feisty retorts often made the conversations acrimonious.Finally, the Club established a firm rule: No one could talk politics two weeks before an election.Apparently, Eaton never acquired the conventional political attitudes of his Tavern Club associates.He voted for Roosevelt four times.
A business associate once asked Eaton if he would consent to be included in a book about great people in industry called, "Small Boys Grown Tall."The book was obviously designed to please the vanity of those included and Eaton wanted no part of it.He returned it with the suggestion that the title be amended to "Small Boys Grown Tall, But Not Broad."
He and Edith traveled to Europe often during the 20s and 30s.He was an enthusiastic art collector, and during the last few years of his life, donated most of his extensive art collection to Williams College.
Eaton was always formal, even with long-time associates.Logan Monroe, who worked with Eaton for 29 years, recalls that there were only a handful of people he ever called by their first name.To the employees, he was always, "Mr.Eaton."His friends most often called him "Joe," and occasionally "J.O."
Eaton had a strong sense of vision.He believed in the infant trucking industry and staked his future on his belief.He learned quickly, after his own company was sold to Republic in 1917, that the quickest way to grow was to acquire other promising companies.
When Eaton died in 1949, at age 75, the company he had started had grown to 11 plants in the United States and Canada.But his legacy was not so much in physical plant as it was the integrity he insisted upon in every facet of the company's operations.He was an involved leader who motivated people to high achievements and set the direction and purpose of the company.
Other People with the name "Eaton":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.