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Wrong J.F. Coakley?

J.F. Coakley

Senior Lecturer On Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Houghton

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Houghton

Background Information

Employment History

Church of England


Teacher

Lancaster University


Web References(20 Total References)


The B.A. Diploma from A to Z

www.harvard-magazine.com [cached]

"The cursive writing is mechanical, tightly spaced and practically illegible," writes J.F. Coakley '68."The flabby blackletter is not much better.The dotted line for the President's signature is unsightly, and also spurious since President Eliot's actual signature had given way to a printed facsimile in about 1897."The diploma "has a mean and cramped look."Coakley is the author of The Harvard B.A. Degree Diploma, 1813-2000, which he printed (superbly) last summer on his hand-cranked Vandercook proofing press, model 4, at his Jericho Press in Oxford, England, in Monotype Octavian and Ehrhardt on Zerkall mould-made paper in an edition of 50 copies. (The book is published by the Harvard College Library and may be had for $300 a copy by application to Monique Duhaime at Houghton.)"From that beginning until now, there have been just six different designs of the B.A. degree diploma," writes Coakley."These are the subject of the present book--the first book, to my knowledge, on the subject of a college diploma--and they make a concise study, not only in Harvardian rhetoric but also in the history of typographical taste and the progress of printing technology."(Coakley argues in a footnote that "official Harvard style says 'A.B.' instead of 'B.A.', but for no obvious reason.") His book is cased along with specimens of the six diplomas, some freshly printed from old plates and all but one at its original size. Coakley earned his own Harvard diploma as a mathematics concentrator.He won a Marshall Scholarship, but deferred it to enlist in the army's 82nd Airborne Division, and actually jumped from a few airplanes.After that, he went off to Trinity College, Cambridge, switched course to read theology, did a second B.A., stayed for a Ph.D., met his wife-to-be at a party given by their professor (the radical theologian Bishop John A.T. Robinson), married, and settled.In 1993 he was living in Oxford, teaching New Testament studies at Lancaster University, when his wife, Sarah, was offered a professorship at Harvard Divinity School.Over they came, retaining their house in England, and "Chip," as he is called, became a senior lecturer on Near Eastern languages and civilizations and a cataloger in the manuscript department of Houghton.The diploma of 1903.Coakley wrote and printed an earlier volume of Harvard history, Veritas Imprimata: The Typography of Harvard Arms (see "Variations on a Theme," March-April 1996, page 64), reproducing 63 versions of the University's shield.To learn what else has issued from the Jericho Press, visit www.fas.harvard.edu/~coakley/jericho.htm.Many of his publications employ Syriac and other exotic types.He likes to print something, of not too many pages, every summer.He's cranking out about 80 collects from the first English prayerbook of 1549 right now. Next ArticleNext ArticleThe B.A. Diploma from A to Z, page 69, July-August 2001: Volume 103, No. 6


Hugoye Volume 11

bethmardutho.org [cached]

J. F. Coakley, The Typography of Syriac: A Historical Catalogue of Printing Types, 1537-1958


Hugoye Volume 18

bethmardutho.org [cached]

J. F. Coakley, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
J. F. Coakley, Robinson's Paradigms and Exercises in Syriac Grammar


List of GEDSH Entries

www.bethmardutho.org [cached]

By S. P. Brock and J. F. Coakley
By J. F. Coakley By J. F. Coakley 124 Chabot, Jean-Baptiste, Born in Vouvray (Indre-et-Loire, France), J.-B. Chabot entered seminary where he studied Latin and Greek and was ordained as a priest in 1885. By S. P. Brock and J. F. Coakley By J. F. Coakley By J. F. Coakley By S. P. Brock and J. F. Coakley By J. F. Coakley By J. F. Coakley


Who Are The Assyrians

nineveh.com [cached]

One good example may be found in The Church of the East and the Church of England[70] by J.F. Coakley.
[70] J.F. Coakley (1992), The Church of the East and the Church of England : a History of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Assyrian Mission


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