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Wrong J.D. Stricklen?

J.D. Stricklen

Director

Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston

HQ Phone:  (304) 744-2200

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston

540 Third Avenue

Charleston, West Virginia,25303

United States

Company Description

Serving the Valley Since 1957 Providing Useful Information for Those Planning to Build or Remodel a Home... more

Find other employees at this company (3)

Web References(8 Total References)


Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston

hbagc.org [cached]

J.D. Stricklen


HBA Board Members

www.hbagc.org [cached]

J.D. Stricklen, Builder Member at Large


www.statejournal.com

J.D. Stricklen, who works with Stricklen Properties and is director of the Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston, a local chapter of the National Association of Homebuilders, said the rental business is "through the roof right now.
Stricklen said his company has invested in its rental housing through the years, and has no rental units available right now. "Most of what we own we've built over the past three or four decades, and we currently have three under construction. Right now we have one unit empty and that will be leased tomorrow." Stricklen said that's rare, since the company usually deals with several hundred units. They've already started pre-renting units under construction. Even if home sales start to pick up again, he said, the Charleston area's housing stock has become dated and people will still want better rental units. "There's not been a lot of rental units built in the last 20 years because of depreciation rates. Rentals were a good tax shelter in the '70s, but those loopholes have long since closed," he said. "I find that a lot of these rental houses are being gobbled up right now on the sales market." Stricklen said that West Virginia probably won't see a lot of rental units added to the market due to foreclosures, but in states such as Arizona, Nevada and California "a lot of those foreclosures will be converted to rentals, because the banks can't let them sit vacant." The biggest problem statewide in the rental market is real estate taxes, Stricklen said, because West Virginia basically has only two real estate tax classifications, owner-occupied or non owner-occupied rates. Owner-occupied properties are taxed at roughly half the rate of rentals, he said. "For our apartments, we have to charge more rent because real estate taxes are so high," Stricklen said. Renters are paying the same rate as large commercial companies, he said.


www.statejournal.com

J.D. Stricklen, who works with Stricklen Properties and is director of the Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston, a local chapter of the National Association of Homebuilders, said the rental business is "through the roof right now. "We're a real estate developer, investors, brokers.Rentals go down when house sales go up.That's what we like with being diversified," he added. Stricklen said his company has invested in its rental housing through the years, and has no rental units available right now. "Most of what we own we've built over the past three or four decades, and we currently have three under construction.Right now we have one unit empty and that will be leased tomorrow." Stricklen said that's rare, since the company usually deals with several hundred units.They've already started pre-renting units under construction. Even if home sales start to pick up again, he said, the Charleston area's housing stock has become dated and people will still want better rental units. "There's not been a lot of rental units built in the last 20 years because of depreciation rates.Rentals were a good tax shelter in the '70s, but those loopholes have long since closed," he said."I find that a lot of these rental houses are being gobbled up right now on the sales market." Stricklen said that West Virginia probably won't see a lot of rental units added to the market due to foreclosures, but in states such as Arizona, Nevada and California "a lot of those foreclosures will be converted to rentals, because the banks can't let them sit vacant." The biggest problem statewide in the rental market is real estate taxes, Stricklen said, because West Virginia basically has only two real estate tax classifications, owner-occupied or non owner-occupied rates.Owner-occupied properties are taxed at roughly half the rate of rentals, he said. "For our apartments, we have to charge more rent because real estate taxes are so high," Stricklen said. Renters are paying the same rate as large commercial companies, he said.


Adding Amenities: ; Building a Home Means Getting What You Want, Where You Want It

remodeling.hw.net [cached]

House size is ballooning because of all the amenities people are adding, said J.D. Stricklen, a builder, developer and former president of the Home Builders Association of Greater Charleston. The majority of new homes built nationwide in 1970 had 1 1/2 bathrooms or less, compared with 2 1/2 bathrooms or more in 2003.In 1970, most homes were only one story.In 2003, 52 percent of homes were two stories or more. Plus, house styles are changing, Stricklen said."People want it more open and rooms to flow more freely," Stricklen said. The living room, dining room and kitchen in the Hamons' colonial brown brick exterior home are all situated in one open area.Donna's mother Crystal's large bedroom also serves as her living room, which flows into a laundry area and full bathroom. Although building a home from the ground up gives consumers the flexibility to add the amenities they've always wanted, it can also cost more than buying an existing home. Stricklen and Thomasson agreed the average cost of building a house in the Kanawha Valley hovers around $100 per square foot.


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