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This profile was last updated on 8/14/06  and contains information from public web pages.

pastor Isaac Conroe

Wrong pastor Isaac Conroe?

Pastor

Local Address: Georgetown, Texas, United States
First Baptist Church
 
Background

Employment History

  • Lake Conroe Area
  • Temporary Courthouse
13 Total References
Web References
About
www.fbcconroe.org, 14 Aug 2006 [cached]
Early records show the two churches had a great influence on the citizens of Conroe where there was much lawlessness and men could buy all the nickel beer and dime whiskey they wanted.
...
In 1897, Conroe became the county seat for Montgomery County.The same year there was a yellow fever epidemic so widespread that the State Health Department quarantined the whole city of Conroe.There weren't enough well people to bury the dead.During 1898, when Brother Carson was pastor, Conroe consisted of twenty-four businesses, three saloons and three hotels.
...
In the history of Conroe's Methodist Church, it was reported that in 1899 Miss Margaret Wahrenberger, member of a prominent Conroe family, took a group of young people from both Methodist and Baptist churches to a recreation spot under a big pecan tree north of Conroe near the railroad tracks.
...
In the history of Conroe's Methodist Church, it was reported that in 1899 Miss Margaret Wahrenberger, member of a prominent Conroe family, took a group of young people from both Methodist and Baptist churches to a recreation spot under a big pecan tree north of Conroe near the railroad tracks.
...
J.W. Thomas ended his pastorate in Conroe with the church still negligent in paying his salary.
...
When Brother W.J. Durham came in 1900, Conroe could boast a population of one thousand and nine people, but there were not enough Baptists to pay the preacher, and the people of the church again asked the help of the State Board to pay the pastor.
...
Boynton pastored two years and Rev. J.H.H. Ellis of Cleveland came to Conroe in 1913 to preach for one Sunday in each month, including the fourth Sunday in September.
...
As men from Conroe answered the call to serve their country, the church prayed fervently for their safe return.
...
Sadly, Conroe was no exception to this practice.When it was alleged that a white woman had been assaulted by a black man, the whole community was inflamed.
...
In the letter they wrote, they stated that the Methodist Church in Conroe had a beautiful brick building, and the Baptist Church had only a frame building.
...
Dr. Tharp left Conroe for West End Baptist Church in Houston.
...
Finally in December 1931, Conroe changed for the better financially.
...
Overnight, Conroe became a city of tents and hastily constructed houses.
...
Brother Gray left Conroe to become pastor of First Baptist Church, McAllen.
...
Dr. A.C. Donath, who had been a missionary to Africa for seven years, came from First Baptist Church, San Angelo to pastor Conroe's First Baptist.
...
Citizens of Conroe today owe a debt to Dr. Donath for naming the streets and assigning numbers to houses.
...
Dr. Herrington resigned after nineteen years of service in Conroe to become pastor of First Baptist Church, Georgetown, Texas.
...
The sixth mission established Baptist Fellowship of the Americas meeting at Southside Baptist Church in Conroe.
...
Conroe, the county seat of Montgomery County, is on Interstate Highway 45 at the junction of the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads, seven miles southeast of Lake Conroe in central Montgomery County.In 1881 Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe established a sawmill on Stewarts Creek two miles east of the International-Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. G. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830s.A small tram line connected the mill to the I-GN track, but Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN.In January 1884 a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H. M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster; within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe.
In the mid-1880s the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota-Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county.Conroe Mill School was established in 1886, and not long afterward the community's first black school was founded at Madeley Quarters, south of town.A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe.By 1889 the population had climbed to an estimated 300.
...
A residence donated by Isaac Conroe served as a temporary courthouse until a permanent brick structure could be erected in 1891.By the early 1890s Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist congregations were organized in the town; they initially shared a single house of worship.Simultaneously, black residents founded Baptist and African Methodist Episcopal congregations.By 1892 the community had become a shipping center for lumber, cotton, livestock, and bricks, and had five steam-powered saw and planing mills, several brickyards, a cotton gin, a gristmill, several hotels and general stores, and a population of 500.The Conroe Independent School District was established in 1892, combining twelve nearby common school districts.By 1896 the community's first weekly newspaper, the Courier, had been founded.By 1900 Conroe was Montgomery County's largest community.It was incorporated in 1904 with a population of 1,009, and its first mayor and city council were elected the following year.In 1906 the first electric lighting appeared in the town when an electrical generating plant was constructed on nearby Stewarts Creek.Over the next two decades the Conroe Independent School District was expanded to encompass twenty-five square miles.Some 617 pupils were enrolled in the district by 1913.The prosperity of the local agriculture and timber industries in the early twentieth century enabled Conroe to continue its rapid early growth despite severe fires in 1901 and 1911, which destroyed much of the business district near the courthouse square.Southwest of town in 1913 the Delta Land and Timber Company established one of the most extensive milling operations in the South; the company eventually employed 700 people.In addition to its many churches and schools, by 1914 Conroe had two banks, five grocery and hardware stores, two dry-goods stores, two drugstores, a cotton gin, a waterworks, a planing mill, numerous sawmills, box factories, cross-tie mills, two weekly newspapers, the Courier and the Montgomery County Times, and an estimated population of 1,374.The population continued to climb for the next several years, reaching an estimated 1,858 in the mid-twenties and an estimated 2,457 by 1931.A sanitarium was established in Conroe in 1920.The community acquired its first fire truck in 1921, and two years built its first fire station.In the mid-1920s the Dr Pepper Company opened a soft-drink plant in the community.In 1925 the Conroe Independent School District was enlarged to its present size, 330 square miles, with the inclusion of fifteen rural common schools and 600 additional pupils scattered through central and southern Montgomery County.Children from discontinued schools were transported in private buses to schools in Conroe.
...
The oil revenues and population influx of the 1930s lent Conroe a boomtown atmosphere.
...
In 1946 the Montgomery County Library was established in Conroe.By 1952 Conroe had a population estimated at 7,313 and 340 businesses.The population climbed to an estimated 9,192 in 1961 and 11,969 in 1972.With the construction of Interstate Highway 45, increasing numbers of Houstonians took up residence on the margins of Conroe.Lake Conroe was impounded in the late 1960s and early 1970s, seven miles northwest on the West Fork of the San Jacinto River, further stimulating local growth.In addition to the familiar lumber and petrochemical concerns, a number of new manufacturing and engineering firms have been established in Conroe.The population reached an estimated 18,034 by 1982.Conroe Independent School District had an enrollment of 8,873 in 1971 and 15,112 by 1976.In 1980 the district employed 1,200 teachers in twenty-eight schools.Conroe Normal and Industrial College has struggled for survival since the depression; by 1980 enrollment had been reduced to 176.In the 1980s Conroe had two hospitals, a nursing home, ten medical clinics, nineteen churches, three radio stations, a television station, a cab company, e new sewage treatment plant, and a newspaper named the Daily Courier.
Conroe & Lake Conroe Real Estate Homes for Sale in Montgomery County Texas Realtor Kat Anderson
www.conroerealestate.net, 20 Aug 2003 [cached]
Hi, I am Kat Anderson, your real estate professional in Conroe - Lake Conroe , Texas.
...
Conroe - Lake Conroe , located just 40 minutes north of Houston, Texas, "close to the city but far from ordinary" . Conroe - Lake Conroe 's precise location is 245 feet above sea level at 30.32° north of the equator and 95.47° west.
...
"In 1881, Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe - Lake Conroe established a sawmill on Stewart's Creek two miles east of the International Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830's. A small tram line connected the mill to the track, but Conroe - Lake Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884, a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H.M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe - Lake Conroe 's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster; within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe - Lake Conroe ."
In 1881, Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe - Lake Conroe established a sawmill on Stewart's Creek two miles east of the International Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830's. A small tram line connected the mill to the track, but Conroe - Lake Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884, a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H.M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe - Lake Conroe 's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster; within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe - Lake Conroe .
In the mid 1880's the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county. A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe - Lake Conroe . In 1889, Conroe - Lake Conroe replaced Montgomery as the county seat. A residence donated by Isaac Conroe - Lake Conroe served as a temporary courthouse until a permanent brick structure could be erected in 1891.
...
In November 1930, Conroe - Lake Conroe 's only bank abruptly failed and pushed many residents and institutions into financial doldrums for many years.
...
All contents on this and related web sites are provided by Kat Anderson, Realtor specializing in Conroe - Lake Conroe real estate and in the surrounding areas.
About Lake Conroe | Lake Conroe Texas
www.lakeconroe.com, 13 Feb 2015 [cached]
HISTORY OF CONROE In 1881, Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe established a sawmill on Stewart's Creek two miles east of the International-Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830s. A small tram line connected the mill to the track, but Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884, a post office was established at the mill commissary. At the suggestion of railroad official H.M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster. Within a decade, the name was shortened to Conroe. n the mid 1880s, the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota-Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county. A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe. In 1889, Conroe replaced Montgomery as the county seat. A residence donated by Isaac Conroe served as a temporary courthouse until a permanent brick structure could be erected in 1891. y 1892 the community had become a shipping center for lumber, cotton, livestock and bricks. It had five steam-powered saw and planing mills, several brickyards, a cotton gin, a gristmill, and several hotels and general stores. The Conroe Independent School District was established and by 1896 the community's first weekly newspaper, the Courier, had been founded.
By 1900, Conroe was Montgomery County's largest community. It was incorporated in 1904 with a population of 1,009, and its first mayor and city council were elected the following year. In 1906, the first electric lighting appeared in the town when an electrical generating plant was constructed on nearby Stewart's Creek.
The prosperity of the local agriculture and timber industries in the early twentieth century enabled Conroe to continue its rapid early growth despite severe fires in 1901 and 1911, which destroyed much of the business district near the courthouse square. After a few years of sustained growth, the town's prosperity was threatened in the late 1920s by the dwindling of the improperly managed local timber supply. Then in 1930 the spreading effects of the Great Depression struck Montgomery County, drastically curtailing lumber production and forcing many mills to close. In November 1930, Conroe's only bank abruptly failed and pushed many residents and institutions into financial doldrums for many years.
...
The oil revenues and population influx of the 1930s lent Conroe a boomtown atmosphere.
...
Willis won the county seat from Montgomery in 1874, however, the courthouse was never moved to Willis and in 1889 was moved permanently to Conroe.
About
www.fbcconroe.org, 6 April 2006 [cached]
Early records show the two churches had a great influence on the citizens of Conroe where there was much lawlessness and men could buy all the nickel beer and dime whiskey they wanted. In March 1893, the church elected a building committee to erect their own church, choosing the site near the old Montgomery County Hospital at the intersection of South First Street and Avenue E. They had turkey dinners, pie suppers, and bazaars to raise the money to pay for the church building. After two years of hard work by the building committee and other devout members, Conroe Baptists had a wood frame church of their own. Brother J.W. Brazleton was ordained as a minister on May 2, 1896, the first pastor to be ordained in this church. Later that same year on December 8, he became the third pastor of the church. In 1897, Conroe became the county seat for Montgomery County. The same year there was a yellow fever epidemic so widespread that the State Health Department quarantined the whole city of Conroe. There weren't enough well people to bury the dead. During 1898, when Brother Carson was pastor, Conroe consisted of twenty-four businesses, three saloons and three hotels. When good Christian people came to town, they walked on the wooden floorway that went from one store to another until they came to a saloon. Then to avoid the saloon, they would move off the floorway and walk along a path around the edge of the street. Brother J.W. Thomas came as pastor in 1898. There was continued cooperation with the Methodists. In the history of Conroe's Methodist Church, it was reported that in 1899 Miss Margaret Wahrenberger, member of a prominent Conroe family, took a group of young people from both Methodist and Baptist churches to a recreation spot under a big pecan tree north of Conroe near the railroad tracks.
...
J.W. Thomas ended his pastorate in Conroe with the church still negligent in paying his salary. When Brother W.J. Durham came in 1900, Conroe could boast a population of one thousand and nine people, but there were not enough Baptists to pay the preacher, and the people of the church again asked the help of the State Board to pay the pastor.
...
Bro. Boynton pastored two years and Rev. J.H.H. Ellis of Cleveland came to Conroe in 1913 to preach for one Sunday in each month, including the fourth Sunday in September.
...
As men from Conroe answered the call to serve their country, the church prayed fervently for their safe return.
...
Sadly, Conroe was no exception to this practice. When it was alleged that a white woman had been assaulted by a black man, the whole community was inflamed.
...
In the letter they wrote, they stated that the Methodist Church in Conroe had a beautiful brick building, and the Baptist Church had only a frame building.
...
Dr. Tharp left Conroe for West End Baptist Church in Houston.
...
Finally in December 1931, Conroe changed for the better financially.
...
Overnight, Conroe became a city of tents and hastily constructed houses.
...
Brother Gray left Conroe to become pastor of First Baptist Church, McAllen.
...
Dr. A.C. Donath, who had been a missionary to Africa for seven years, came from First Baptist Church, San Angelo to pastor Conroe's First Baptist.
...
Citizens of Conroe today owe a debt to Dr. Donath for naming the streets and assigning numbers to houses.
...
Dr. Herrington resigned after nineteen years of service in Conroe to become pastor of First Baptist Church, Georgetown, Texas.
...
The sixth mission established Baptist Fellowship of the Americas meeting at Southside Baptist Church in Conroe.
...
Conroe, the county seat of Montgomery County, is on Interstate Highway 45 at the junction of the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads, seven miles southeast of Lake Conroe in central Montgomery County. In 1881 Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe established a sawmill on Stewarts Creek two miles east of the International-Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. G. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830s. A small tram line connected the mill to the I-GN track, but Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884 a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H. M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster; within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe.
In the mid-1880s the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota-Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county. Conroe Mill School was established in 1886, and not long afterward the community's first black school was founded at Madeley Quarters, south of town. A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe. By 1889 the population had climbed to an estimated 300.
...
A residence donated by Isaac Conroe served as a temporary courthouse until a permanent brick structure could be erected in 1891. By the early 1890s Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist congregations were organized in the town; they initially shared a single house of worship. Simultaneously, black residents founded Baptist and African Methodist Episcopal congregations. By 1892 the community had become a shipping center for lumber, cotton, livestock, and bricks, and had five steam-powered saw and planing mills, several brickyards, a cotton gin, a gristmill, several hotels and general stores, and a population of 500. The Conroe Independent School District was established in 1892, combining twelve nearby common school districts. By 1896 the community's first weekly newspaper, the Courier, had been founded. By 1900 Conroe was Montgomery County's largest community. It was incorporated in 1904 with a population of 1,009, and its first mayor and city council were elected the following year. In 1906 the first electric lighting appeared in the town when an electrical generating plant was constructed on nearby Stewarts Creek. Over the next two decades the Conroe Independent School District was expanded to encompass twenty-five square miles. Some 617 pupils were enrolled in the district by 1913. The prosperity of the local agriculture and timber industries in the early twentieth century enabled Conroe to continue its rapid early growth despite severe fires in 1901 and 1911, which destroyed much of the business district near the courthouse square. Southwest of town in 1913 the Delta Land and Timber Company established one of the most extensive milling operations in the South; the company eventually employed 700 people. In addition to its many churches and schools, by 1914 Conroe had two banks, five grocery and hardware stores, two dry-goods stores, two drugstores, a cotton gin, a waterworks, a planing mill, numerous sawmills, box factories, cross-tie mills, two weekly newspapers, the Courier and the Montgomery County Times, and an estimated population of 1,374. The population continued to climb for the next several years, reaching an estimated 1,858 in the mid-twenties and an estimated 2,457 by 1931. A sanitarium was established in Conroe in 1920. The community acquired its first fire truck in 1921, and two years built its first fire station. In the mid-1920s the Dr Pepper Company opened a soft-drink plant in the community. In 1925 the Conroe Independent School District was enlarged to its present size, 330 square miles, with the inclusion of fifteen rural common schools and 600 additional pupils scattered through central and southern Montgomery County. Children from discontinued schools were transported in private buses to schools in Conroe. After years of sustained growth, the town's prosperity was threatened in the late 1920s by the dwindling of the improperly managed local timber supply. Then in 1930 the spreading effects of the Great Depression struck Montgomery County, drastically curtailing lumber production and forcing many mills to close. In November 1930 Conroe's only bank abruptly failed and pushed many residents and institutions into financial doldrums for many years. Faced with precipitous declines in revenue, Conroe's schools struggled to complete full terms.
...
The oil revenues and population influx of the 1930s lent Conroe a boomtown atmosphere.
...
In 1946 the Montgomery County Library was established in Conroe. By 1952 Conroe had a population estimated at 7,313 and 340 businesses. The population climbed to an estimated 9,192 in 1961 and 11,969 in 1972. With the construction of Interstate Highway 45, increasing numbers of Houstonians took up residence on the margins of Conroe. Lake Conroe was impounded in the late 1960s and early 1970s, seven miles northwest on the West Fork of the San Jacinto River, further stimulating local growth. In addition to the familiar lumber and petrochemical concerns, a number of new manufacturing and engineering firms have been established in Conroe. The population reached an estimate
Conroe is just the right blend ...
www.allacrosstexas.com [cached]
Conroe is just the right blend of starry nights and city lights. Nestled in the lush Piney Woods of East Texas, the city embraces you with genuine Texas friendly hospitality. Small town appeal and big city attractions make Conroe a favorite destination for family fun, travelling professionals and romantic escapes.
...
Conroe, the county seat of Montgomery County, is on Interstate Highway 45 at the junction of the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads, seven miles southeast of Lake Conroe in central Montgomery County. In 1881 Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe established a sawmill on Stewarts Creek two miles east of the International-Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. G. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830s. A small tram line connected the mill to the I-GN track, but Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884 a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H. M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe's Switch, in honor of the Northern-born, former Union cavalry officer who founded it and served as its first postmaster; within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe.
In the mid-1880s the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota-Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county. Conroe Mill School was established in 1886, and not long afterward the community's first black school was founded at Madeley Quarters, south of town. A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe. By 1889 the population had climbed to an estimated 300. In that year Conroe replaced Montgomery as county seat. A residence donated by Isaac Conroe served as a temporary courthouse until a permanent brick structure could be erected in 1891.
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