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2011-12-09T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Ina Woolman?

Ms. Ina S. Woolman

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Background Information

Employment History

Coordinator of Gifted Education

Rhode Island Department of Education

Web References (8 Total References)


RI State Advisory Committee — Rhode Island Advocates for Gifted Education

www.riage.org [cached]

Ina Woolman, was working one day per week as the Coordinator of Gifted Education for the Rhode Island Department of Education. Ms. Woolman has retired and no one has been hired to replace her. The State Advisory is no longer meeting.


RI State Advisory Page - RIAGE - Rhode Island Advocates for Gifted Education

www.riage.org [cached]

Ina Woolman, was working one day per week as the Coordinator of Gifted Education for the Rhode Island Department of Education. Ms. Woolman has retired and no one has been hired to replace her. The State Advisory is no longer meeting.

...
At the Rhode Island State Advisory Committee of the Gifted and Talented meeting held on September 29th, 2005, Ina Woolman, coordinator of Gifted Education for the Rhode Island Department of Education announced that she is working to have the State Education Department phase out the term gifted and talented, in some cases, and replace it with beyond grade level.
The new term has already been written into the state's Basic Education Plan, Ms. Woolman said, and may soon replace
...
Also at the meeting, Ms. Woolman explained that a long held interpretation of state regulations pertaining to gifted and talented programs, was that these rules were only in effect in cases where gifted and talented programs were actually funded by communities. But this is no longer considered a proper reading of these regulations at the state level, she said. Ms. Woolman also announced that The Department of Education's Office of Special Needs is preparing a letter advising the state's Superintendents of Schools of this revised interpretation of these regulations.
...
Ms. Woolman replied that she was working on that, but it was unclear at this point whether that would happen.
RIAGE urges Commissioner McWalters to support this initiative by Ms. Woolman.
...
Ms. Woolman acknowledged that these changes as they stand now could offer parents and students some leverage in working out arrangements with schools and school departments.
...
Ms. Woolman also handed out a draft of a questionnaire, called (Note the title!)


RIAGE - Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children

www.riage.org [cached]

At the Rhode Island State Advisory Committee of the Gifted and Talented meeting held on September 29th, Ina Woolman, coordinator of Gifted Education for the Rhode Island Department of Education announced that she is working to have the State Education Department phase out the term "gifted and talented," in some cases, and replace it with "beyond grade level."

The new term has already been written into the state's Basic Education Plan, Ms. Woolman said.
...
Also at the meeting, Ms. Woolman explained that a long held interpretation of state regulations pertaining to gifted and talented programs, was that these rules were only in effect in cases where gifted and talented programs were actually funded by communities.But this is no longer considered a proper reading of these regulations at the state level, she said.Ms. Woolman also announced that The Department of Education's Office of Special Needs is preparing a letter advising the state's Superintendents of Schools of this revised interpretation of these regulations.
...
Ms. Woolman replied that she was working on that, but it was unclear at this point whether that would happen.
RIAGE urges Commissioner McWalters to support this initiative by Ms. Woolman.
...
Ms. Woolman acknowledged that these changes as they stand now could offer parents and students some leverage in working out arrangements with schools and school departments.
...
Ms. Woolman also handed out a draft of a questionnaire, called (Note the title!) "The Learning Beyond Grade Level - Inventory".


Contact RTI - Response To Intervention (RTI) - A Rhode Island Technical Assistance Project (RITAP) Site

www.ritap.org [cached]

Ina Woolman Rhode Island Department of Education Office of Special Population 255 Westminster St. Providence, RI 02903 401-222-8340


Samples : The Gifted Riddle

www.darachadwick.com [cached]

So the programs that do exist vary tremendously - from none at all in some towns to well-structured, well-funded programs in others, says Ina Woolman, coordinator of gifted education for the Rhode Island Department of Education.

Support for gifted education has always been cyclical, says Woolman."In 1980, about when we started the State Advocates for Gifted Education (which no longer exists), I read somewhere that interest and support for 'gifted education' waxes and wanes on about a 20-year cycle," she says.
...
"This has happened nationwide, not just in Rhode Island," Woolman says.I believe the support comes from an understanding that more children are better supported [by enrichment programs], and that education for all kids improves when it is infused throughout the school.It is also considered that the broader participation is more equitable."
At the same time, Woolman says, there is concern that such programs can neglect the kids who really need to move way ahead in various ways - academic and otherwise.
"Enrichment programs can and should support kids who really learn differently, faster or broader, but they don't always do it," she says.
...
"Where [gifted] testing is done in Rhode Island, as in any state, its purpose is usually to determine which students get into the school or district program," says Woolman."Sometimes, testing is done to decide how best to serve the [particular] child, rather than to qualify them for a specific program, but I believe that is probably rare."
The complexity of determining who is gifted has led more schools to emphasize enrichment programs for all children over pull-out classes for some.
"Many districts do not decide who is gifted, but instead provide a program which recognizes students' interests and abilities and offers individualized or group activities and support in response," says Woolman.
"[This program is offered] along a continuum, from just a small response to something quite evolved and very different from the 'regular' program - without ever saying 'this kid is gifted and that one isn't.'"
Woolman says she is a firm believer that test scores do not prove giftedness and that there's no "yes" or "no" answer to whether a child is gifted or not.She advises parents who are interested in having their child tested to consider what they hope the testing will achieve and what they will do if their child is identified as gifted.
...
Here are some tips from Ina Woolman, coordinator of gifted education for the Rhode Island Department of Education.

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