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This profile was last updated on 9/24/04  and contains information from public web pages.

Imelda Romualdez

Wrong Imelda Romualdez?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Minister of Human Settlement and Governor
    Metropolitan Manila
  • Minister of Human Settlements and Governor
    Metro Manila
  • Minister
    Human Settlements
  • Governor
    Manila

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Member
    Parliament
Web References
Austin Film Society :: Tx Doc Tour :: IMELDA
www.austinfilm.org, 24 Sept 2004 [cached]
When Imelda Romualdez was named runner-up as "Miss Manila," she immediately visited the mayor of the capital to complain.The judges' decision was overturned immediately.
...
Moving into beautiful quarters, the young couple's life seemed idyllic, but soon Imelda became aware of her young husband's overnight flings with other women.With his philandering and insistence that she control her weight, the young bride was on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
...
Imelda greeted supporters, presided over dinners, addressed crowds and, even more pleasing, sang at the rallies.Before her, presidential wives had stayed at home, raised the children, and never meddled in campaigning.But Imelda would go out to the countryside, dressed to the hilt, but willing to put on rubber boots and get down in the muddy rice paddies with the farmers.She instinctively knew that the "little people," as she calls them, wanted to see her among them.Her own childhood wasn't that different from theirs, so she came to see herself as a symbol of beautiful possibilities.
...
At this point in the documentary, Imelda's well-powdered mask slips and we see her falter in trying to defend her husband's declaration of martial law as based on his democratic commitment.As under all dictatorships words lose their meaning, as "war" becomes "peace" and "oppression" becomes "democracy."The first linguistic victims are surely those who utter lies as "truth."They probably forget what their own words are really covering up.Thus, the spirit of fascism lived on in the Marcos regime.
Even though Imelda benefited, the cracks were beginning to appear in the beautiful marble statue.During one of her speeches for Marcos, Imelda was nearly killed by a bolo-wielding assassin.
...
Imelda says today that she decided "the Lord saved her life because she was generous in giving and serving."If that was so, she decided to be selfless and "give it all" (just not away).Instead she would spend government money on her numerous projects.While working as Minister of Human Settlement and Governor of Metropolitan Manila, she simultaneously constructed many needed (or frivolous) facilities and amassed a treasure of jewels, clothing, and property.She eventually controlled 15% of the national budget.Some critics, when confronted with the long list of buildings and projects she made possible, point out that very few of them were for the poor.They either didn't or couldn't afford to enter.However, Imelda was powerful enough to stand up to the entrenched Catholic Church and support birth control with condoms and reproductive education.
Throughout the film Imelda discusses her ideals of beauty.She believes that it takes effort, not money, to be beautiful and to be surrounded by beautiful things.Yet, her couturier confesses that some of the women working for him went blind while embroidering the beautiful clothes that Imelda wore.At what price for the country were her ideals of beauty upheld?She honestly believes that poor people felt better when seeing her live well.As she says, "I seem to be able to see only the positive things, the beautiful things in life.When I see garbage or ugliness, I turn my back or seem to be able to skip it."So that is how she must have withstood her husband's bloody actions.She just didn't look, like any good Mafioso's wife.
...
Anyone speaking out against Marcos or Imelda was considered subversive.
...
Placing jewels in her grandchildren's extra diapers, Imelda fled along with the family.It was after their escape that the "little people" rushed into the presidential palace to find, much like the October revolutionaries in czarist Russia, opulence beyond their wildest dreams.Thousands of pairs of shoes, numerous paintings, fine jewels, money, antique furniture, and rooms of clothing testified to the immense graft.Imelda disingenuously says, "When they went to my closets, they found shoes, not skeletons."Well, not quite.
Though she has certainly continued to live quite well with apartments in New York City (they owned a number of buildings) and elsewhere, Imelda has lost the power she once enjoyed.
...
Finally getting her wish to be an actress, Imelda has had ample opportunity to cry and faint in various court appearances.
Even though Ferdinand's body couldn't return to the Philippines, Imelda boldly (shamelessly?) returned to her homeland to run for President in 1992.
...
As two of her three children successfully get elected to political offices (governor and congresswoman), Imelda sits watching an interview with them and lets us know when the part about "Mommy" is coming up.The mind boggles.
But after watching all the footage of the film, interviews with Imelda, friends, and opponents; historical footage of American colonialism, Japanese occupation, and independence; newsreels of demonstrations, political rallies, public works inaugurations; and Marcos home movies and photographs, one is left with a much clearer picture of a very amazing but disturbing/disturbed person.She's not worried what we think: "My life has been complicated by everyone.
A Concise History of Southeast Asia, Chapter 8
www.xenohistorian.faithweb.com, 7 April 2005 [cached]
Together Ferdinand and Imelda made an attractive couple, often compared with John and Jackie Kennedy.
...
Imelda became governor of Metro Manila, Minister of Human Settlements, and chairperson of 23 other agencies and corporations.Imelda's brother Benjamin first became governor of Leyte (his family's home island), then ambassador to China, and finally ambassador to the United States.The president's sister, and later his son, were governors of Ilocos Norte.
...
Imelda gave lavish parties that looked like something out of a Cecil B. DeMille movie, and went on megabuck shopping sprees whenever she visited the United States.
...
Imelda persuaded him to go abroad for the bypass surgery he needed; a move that exiled him, though he did get better.
SHOES - Womens Shoes, Shoes Store, Man Shoes - Shopping, Services and Information at SHOESIWORLD.COM
www.shoesiworld.com, 6 Feb 2005 [cached]
Imelda Romualdez was born to Vicente Orestes Romualdez and Remedios Trinidad and spent her early life as a beauty queen.
...
Imelda took an active role in politics, and was appointed Minister of Human Settlements and Governor of Metro Manila.
She advocated the construction of hospitals, schools and museums.She also instituted many social welfare programs throughout the nation as well as cultural programs, and the "Green Revolution" â€" a government program that significantly increased the production of rice and other agricultural produce.New homes for wayward children and the aged were built as well as housing for the poor.
...
While much of the Philippines remained mired in poverty due to the sinking economy, Imelda was said to possess hundreds of pairs of shoes in an enormous walk-in closet and hordes of jewels. [1].
Life following the Marcos presidency
In 1986, the Marcos regime was toppled and the couple sought exile in Hawaii.Ferdinand died in 1989 and, three years later, Imelda returned to the Philippines and ran for president.
Ferdinand Marcos
asianhistory.about.com, 5 July 2009 [cached]
A handsome man, Marcos had married the former beauty queen Imelda Romualdez in 1954.
...
Imelda herself was a member of Parliament (1978-84); Governor of Manila (1976-86); and Minister of Human Settlements (1978-86).
...
Imelda may have ordered Aquino's killing, which sparked massive protests.
...
Imelda famously left over 2,500 pairs of shoes in her closet when she fled Manila.
Austin Film Society :: Tx Doc Tour :: IMELDA
www.austinfilmsociety.com, 21 May 2004 [cached]
When Imelda Romualdez was named runner-up as "Miss Manila," she immediately visited the mayor of the capital to complain.The judges' decision was overturned immediately.
...
Moving into beautiful quarters, the young couple's life seemed idyllic, but soon Imelda became aware of her young husband's overnight flings with other women.With his philandering and insistence that she control her weight, the young bride was on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
...
Imelda greeted supporters, presided over dinners, addressed crowds and, even more pleasing, sang at the rallies.Before her, presidential wives had stayed at home, raised the children, and never meddled in campaigning.But Imelda would go out to the countryside, dressed to the hilt, but willing to put on rubber boots and get down in the muddy rice paddies with the farmers.She instinctively knew that the "little people," as she calls them, wanted to see her among them.Her own childhood wasn't that different from theirs, so she came to see herself as a symbol of beautiful possibilities.
...
At this point in the documentary, Imelda's well-powdered mask slips and we see her falter in trying to defend her husband's declaration of martial law as based on his democratic commitment.As under all dictatorships words lose their meaning, as "war" becomes "peace" and "oppression" becomes "democracy."The first linguistic victims are surely those who utter lies as "truth."They probably forget what their own words are really covering up.Thus, the spirit of fascism lived on in the Marcos regime.
Even though Imelda benefited, the cracks were beginning to appear in the beautiful marble statue.During one of her speeches for Marcos, Imelda was nearly killed by a bolo-wielding assassin.
...
Imelda says today that she decided "the Lord saved her life because she was generous in giving and serving."If that was so, she decided to be selfless and "give it all" (just not away).Instead she would spend government money on her numerous projects.While working as Minister of Human Settlement and Governor of Metropolitan Manila, she simultaneously constructed many needed (or frivolous) facilities and amassed a treasure of jewels, clothing, and property.She eventually controlled 15% of the national budget.Some critics, when confronted with the long list of buildings and projects she made possible, point out that very few of them were for the poor.They either didn't or couldn't afford to enter.However, Imelda was powerful enough to stand up to the entrenched Catholic Church and support birth control with condoms and reproductive education.
Throughout the film Imelda discusses her ideals of beauty.She believes that it takes effort, not money, to be beautiful and to be surrounded by beautiful things.Yet, her couturier confesses that some of the women working for him went blind while embroidering the beautiful clothes that Imelda wore.At what price for the country were her ideals of beauty upheld?She honestly believes that poor people felt better when seeing her live well.As she says, "I seem to be able to see only the positive things, the beautiful things in life.When I see garbage or ugliness, I turn my back or seem to be able to skip it."So that is how she must have withstood her husband's bloody actions.She just didn't look, like any good Mafioso's wife.
...
Anyone speaking out against Marcos or Imelda was considered subversive.
...
Placing jewels in her grandchildren's extra diapers, Imelda fled along with the family.It was after their escape that the "little people" rushed into the presidential palace to find, much like the October revolutionaries in czarist Russia, opulence beyond their wildest dreams.Thousands of pairs of shoes, numerous paintings, fine jewels, money, antique furniture, and rooms of clothing testified to the immense graft.Imelda disingenuously says, "When they went to my closets, they found shoes, not skeletons."Well, not quite.
Though she has certainly continued to live quite well with apartments in New York City (they owned a number of buildings) and elsewhere, Imelda has lost the power she once enjoyed.
...
Finally getting her wish to be an actress, Imelda has had ample opportunity to cry and faint in various court appearances.
Even though Ferdinand's body couldn't return to the Philippines, Imelda boldly (shamelessly?) returned to her homeland to run for President in 1992.
...
As two of her three children successfully get elected to political offices (governor and congresswoman), Imelda sits watching an interview with them and lets us know when the part about "Mommy" is coming up.The mind boggles.
But after watching all the footage of the film, interviews with Imelda, friends, and opponents; historical footage of American colonialism, Japanese occupation, and independence; newsreels of demonstrations, political rallies, public works inaugurations; and Marcos home movies and photographs, one is left with a much clearer picture of a very amazing but disturbing/disturbed person.She's not worried what we think: "My life has been complicated by everyone.
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