About | Free Trial

Last Update

2016-02-18T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on // .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Illana Gozes?

Prof. Illana Gozes

Director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies At the Faculty of Medicine

Sackler School of Medicine

HQ Phone:

Sackler School of Medicine

6 Burlington Gardens

London w1j 0bd

United Kingdom

Find other employees at this company (99)

Background Information

Affiliations

Member
Tel Aviv University's Sagol School of Neuroscience

Board Member
Chair

Board Member
The International Neuropeptide Society

Chief Scientific Officer
Tel Aviv University

Haim Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellow
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Education

BSc

Tel Aviv University

PHD

Weizmann Institute

Ph. D.

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Ph.D

Tel Aviv University

Web References (193 Total References)


"This study has provided the basis ...

www.israel21c.org [cached]

"This study has provided the basis to detect this biomarker in routine, non-invasive blood tests, and it is known that early intervention is invaluable to Alzheimer's patients," said Prof. Illana Gozes, lead researcher.

"We are now planning to take these preliminary findings forward into clinical trials - to create a pre-Alzheimer's test that will help to tailor potential preventative treatments."
Gozes holds Tel Aviv University's Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and formerly directed the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine. She has investigated treatment approaches to Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, as well as a possible link between autism and Alzheimer's.
ADNP was discovered in Gozes' lab 15 years ago. "Our study is the first to assess ADNP in elderly individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease, and its results open the door for further validation in larger, more informative studies," she says.
...
"ADNP levels in blood may reflect what is going on in the brain, though we need to do further comparisons to get a good picture," says Gozes.
...
Read more on:Health, Alzheimer's, Illana Gozes, Autism


Weblog (Medicine & Health) - American Friends of Tel Aviv University

www.aftau.org [cached]

The research was led by Prof. Illana Gozes, the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors, Head of the Elton Laboratory for Molecular Neuroendocrinology at TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU's Adams Super Center for Brain Studies and the Sagol School of Neuroscience. It was recently published in Molecular Psychiatry.

The difference between men and women?
"We found a clear difference in ADNP's effect on male and female mice," Prof. Gozes said. "The movement of transported material through nerve cells in the brains of the tested mice was slower in males. This information is critical, because it can be used to design more efficient and successful clinical trials for neurological drug candidates, and hopefully develop precise therapies for ADNP-related diseases or conditions with special attention to gender differences."
Prof. Gozes and her team examined the behavioral response of ADNP-deficient and normal male and female mice to different cognitive challenges and social situations. They worked with the Bioinformatics Unit, the NMR Laboratory, the Alfredo Federico Strauss Center for Computational Neuroimaging and Genomic Centers at TAU and the Technion - Institute of Technology to harness state-of-the-art technology that led to the new understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying differences in the male and female mouse brain.
Prof. Gozes has been instrumental in drawing attention to the proteins that bind microtubules - tubes within nerve cells that maintain cellular shape and serve as "train tracks" for movement of biological material through the brain. In this study, Prof. Gozes and her team observed mice in which SKIP was introduced and witnessed accelerated microtubular function in both males and females, using MRI imaging. The pace of neural transport in mice that inhaled magnesium was found to be significantly slower in males.
"The loss of protective proteins exposes cells to physical damage that eventually destroys them," said Prof. Gozes, whose previous research on NAP, a snippet of ADNP, has been proven in multiple studies to protect cognitive functioning. "The new protein-protectant drug candidate SKIP, which is half the size of NAP, was found to increase and repair blocked nerve-cell transport and normalize it."
Social behaviors
Male and female reactions were different in social situations, too. "SKIP was found to normalize mouse reactions in social situations," said Prof. Gozes. "Normal male and female mice behaved very differently: Females were infrequently drawn toward new mice, whereas males were more frequently drawn to new mice. ADNP-deficient male and female mice both preferred the company of familiar mice. After SKIP was introduced, by intranasal administration, we saw that the female and male mice behaved like the ADNP-intact mice.
"When clinicians treat patients, they must look at gender," Prof. Gozes concluded. "There may be a gender difference in the way certain nerves behave and the way the nerve cells communicate. ADNP is involved in this process. There are differences between the way men and women react to their environments, and differences at the molecular level may indicate that indeed there are differences between the very way men and women think."
SKIP (Prof. Gozes, PI) was licensed by Tel Aviv University's technology-transfer company, Ramot, to Coronis Partners Ltd., a specialty pharma company that is currently conducting a financing round for its clinical development.
...
The research was led by Prof. Illana Gozes, the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and former director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU's Sagol School of Neuroscience, conducted by TAU PhD student Anna Malishkevich and spearheaded by Dr. Gad Marshall, Dr. Aaron Schultz, and Prof. Reisa Sperling of Harvard University, and Prof. Judith Aharon-Peretz of Rambam Medical Center - The Technion Institute of Technology.
...
"This study has provided the basis to detect this biomarker in routine, non-invasive blood tests, and it is known that early intervention is invaluable to Alzheimer's patients," said Prof. Gozes. "We are now planning to take these preliminary findings forward into clinical trials - to create a pre-Alzheimer's test that will help to tailor potential preventative treatments."
Builds on original research
This new research is based on Prof. Gozes' earlier investigation of neuronal plasticity and nerve cell protection at the molecular, cellular, and system level, and her discovery of novel families of proteins, including ADNP, associated with cross-communication among neural nerve cells and their support cells.
Prof. Gozes focused on the potential utility of blood ADNP levels as an Alzheimer's biomarker. "The more ADNP RNA found in the blood cells, the fewer aggregates found in the brain of elderly cognitively normal individuals," said Prof. Gozes. "Interestingly, we also found that the more ADNP in the serum, the higher the person's IQ level."
These findings are corroborated by a separate study by an independent group that found that the ADNP protein is present in lesser quantities in serum samples from select mild Alzheimer's disease patients. However, in Prof. Gozes' studies, which approach advanced Alzheimer's disease patients, the ADNP mRNA levels in white blood cells dramatically rose above the levels measured in cognitively normal individuals. This finding suggests that dramatically increased ADNP mRNA blood levels in Alzheimer's patients may be either insufficient or damaging.
"We have found a clear connection between ADNP levels in the blood and amyloid plaques in the brain," said Prof. Gozes.
...
Prof. Gozes, the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and former director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU's Sagol School of Neuroscience, first discovered ADNP as well its crucial role in brain formation, learning, and memory. For 15 years, she has been leading the crusade to understand ADNP and to develop a drug reversing the effects of ADNP deficiencies, which have been linked to schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia, among other neurological and psychiatric diseases.
...
According to Prof. Gozes, who is intimately familiar with Tony's case and that of other ADNP children, greater public awareness of the syndrome will more likely lead to the development of more appropriate care in the future.
"I hope it will become a routine screening in the future for undiagnosed cases that come to the clinic," said Prof. Gozes.
...
A new study by Tel Aviv University's Prof. Illana Gozes, published in Translational Psychiatry, may offer insight into the pathology of both autism and Alzheimer's by revealing that different activities of certain proteins in males and females cause gender-specific tendencies toward these diseases. While the three-to-one ratio of autism in boys to girls is well known, as is the greater number of female Alzheimer's patients, the reasons for these phenomena are less clear.
According to Prof. Gozes, "If we understand how ADNP, an activity-related neuroprotective protein which is a major regulatory gene, acts differently in males and females, we can try to optimize drugs for potential future therapeutics to treat both autism and Alzheimer's disease."
Prof. Gozes is the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors, Head of the Elton Laboratory for Molecular Neuroendocrinology at TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine, a member of TAU's Adams Super Center for Brain Studies and the Sagol School of Neuroscience.
...
For the purpose of the new study, Prof. Gozes and her team examined the behavioral response of male and female mice, both ADNP-altered and normal, to different cognitive challenges and social situations.
...
"ADNP may be new to the world of autism, but I have been studying it for 15 years," said Prof. Gozes.
...
Prof. Gozes hopes the new study will prompt further research into the drug Davunetide (NAP) as a means of treating social and cognitive deficits with special attention to gender differences. Prof. Gozes discovered Davunetide (NAP), a snippet of ADNP, by looking at the nerve cell protective activity of ADNP fragments.
...
The study, led by Tel Aviv University's Prof. Illana Gozes and published in Molecular Psychiatry, reveals a nerve cell protective molecular target that is essential for brain plasticity. According to Prof. Gozes, "This discovery offers the world a new target for drug design and an understanding of mechanisms of cognitive enhancement."
Prof. Gozes is the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU's Sagol School of Neuroscience.
...
The new finding is based on Prof. Gozes' discovery of NAP, a snippet of a protein essential for brain formation (activity-


News Page (Psychology & Psychiatry) - American Friends of Tel Aviv University

www.aftau.org [cached]

Now, Prof. Illana Gozes - the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors, the director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, and a member of the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University - has discovered that an important cell-maintenance process called autophagy is reduced in the brains of schizophrenic patients. The findings, published in Nature's Molecular Psychiatry, advance the understanding of schizophrenia and could enable the development of new diagnostic tests and drug treatments for the disease.

"We discovered a new pathway that plays a part in schizophrenia," said Prof. Gozes.
...
Brain-cell death also occurs in schizophrenics, so Prof. Gozes and her colleagues set out to see if blocked autophagy could be involved in the progression of that condition as well. They found RNA evidence of decreased levels of the protein beclin 1 in the hippocampus of schizophrenia patients, a brain region central to learning and memory. Beclin 1 is central to initiating autophagy - its deficit suggests that the process is indeed blocked in schizophrenia patients. Developing drugs to boost beclin 1 levels and restart autophagy could offer a new way to treat schizophrenia, the researchers say.
"It is all about balance," said Prof Gozes. "Paucity in beclin 1 may lead to decreased autophagy and enhanced cell death. Our research suggests that normalizing beclin 1 levels in schizophrenia patients could restore balance and prevent harmful brain-cell death."
Next, the researchers looked at protein levels in the blood of schizophrenia patients. They found no difference in beclin 1 levels, suggesting that the deficit is limited to the hippocampus. But the researchers also found increased levels of another protein, activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), discovered by Prof. Gozes and shown to be essential for brain formation and function, in the patients' white blood cells.
...
Prof. Gozes discovered ADNP in 1999 and carved a protein fragment, NAP, from it. NAP mimics the protein nerve cell protecting properties. In follow-up studies Prof. Gozes helped develop the drug candidate davunetide (NAP). In Phase II clinical trials, davunetide (NAP) improved the ability of schizophrenic patients to cope with daily life. A recent collaborative effort by Prof. Gozes and Dr. Sandra Cardoso and Dr. Raquel Esteves showed that NAP improved autophagy in cultures of brain-like cells.


9th International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease Drug Discovery

www.worldeventsforum.com [cached]

Illana Gozes, PhD, Tel Aviv University and Allon Therapeutics, Inc.

Dr. Gozes is a founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Allon Therapeutics Inc (Vancouver, Canada) and Professor of Clinical Biochemistry, the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth factors at Tel Aviv University (TAU), where she directs the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies, the Edersheim Levie-Gitter Institute for Functional Brain Imaging. At the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Professor Gozes heads the Dr. Diana and Zelman Elton (Elbaum) Laboratory for Molecular Neuroendocrinology. Professor Gozes serves or has served as a member (or chair) of several faculty/university/national and international committees and is currently the Editor-in Chief of the Journal of Molecular Neuroscience. Professor Gozes was recently elected as President elect of the Israel Society for Neuroscience. Professor Gozes has received a number of scientific awards and prizes for her work, including the Landau Prize for excellent PhD dissertation, the Juludan Prize and later the Teva Prize for opening new horizons in medical research in Israel, the Bergmann prize and later the Neufeld award for leading grant proposals from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. Prof. Gozes was recently selected as the 2007 recipient of the Tel Aviv University Applied Research Award. The award is given to one faculty member annually for outstanding achievements in applied research exemplified by numerous versatile inventions and patents Prof. Gozes educated more than 50 students for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. degrees and has published extensively in the fields of molecular neuroscience, neuropeptides and neuroprotection (>210 publications and a book). She is co-inventor of more than 25 patents and patent applications, including the composition of matter patent on AL-108, Allon's lead compound formulation. Professor Gozes received a Ph.D. from The Weizmann Institute of Science, and a postdoctoral fellow from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was a research associate and visiting scientist at the Salk Institute and the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation and a Fogarty-Scholar-in-Residence at the National Institutes of Health (USA).


12th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ALZHEIMER'S DRUG DISCOVERY

www.worldeventsforum.com [cached]

Illana Gozes, PhD, Allon Therapeutics Inc. - Dr. Gozes is a Professor of Clinical Biochemistry, the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth factors at Tel Aviv University (TAU) Sackler Faculty of Medicine, where she heads the Dr. Diana and Zelman Elton (Elbaum) Laboratory for Molecular Neuroendocrinology. Professor Gozes serves as the Director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at Tel Aviv University and the Levie-Edersheim-Gitter Institute for Functional Brain Imaging, a collaborative project between Tel Aviv University and the Sourasky Medical Center. Professor Gozes serves or has served as a member (or chair) of several faculty/university/national and international committees including serving now as a member of the Board of Governors of Tel Aviv University, the Tel Aviv University Senate, the Scientific Review Board of the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (New York, USA), the Scientific Review Board of the Rett Foundation, member of several Editorial Boards (Peptides, American Journal of Alzheimer's Research and other Dementias, Peptides Research and Therapeutics, Pharmaceutical Drug Design) and Past President of the Israel Society for Neuroscience. Professor Gozes is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, the Secretary General of the European Neuropeptide Club and the Chair of the Summer Neuropeptide Conference, The International Advisory Committee of VIP PACAP and Related Peptides and Chair of the 2011 Conference.

Dr. Gozes is the scientific founder, Chief Scientific Officer of Allon Therapeutics, where she serves as a member of the Board of Directors. Allon was chosen as the "Most Innovative Development Company" in the New Economy 2010 Pharmaceutical & Healthcare Awards sponsored by New Economy Magazine and won the 2011 Gold Leaf Award as the Early Stage Company of the Year (Health) from BIOTECanada. Prof. Gozes has published extensively in the fields of molecular neuroscience and neuroprotection (>230 publications as cited PUBMED; >280 including a book, book chapters and reviews). She is co-inventor of more than 15 patents and applications (totaling >125 results found in the Worldwide data base for Gozes as an applicant or inventor, including the composition of matter patent on davunetide, Allon's lead compound.) Professor Gozes mentored >50 students toward successful MSc and PhD degrees.
Professor Gozes received a BSc from Tel Aviv University, a PhD from The Weizmann Institute of Science, was a Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Associate/Visiting Scientist at the Salk Institute and the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, a Senior Scientist/Associate Professor at the Weizmann Institute and a distinguished Fogarty-Scholar-in-Residence at the National Institutes of Health (USA).

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Gozes

Adi Gozes

Gal Gozes
GE Healthcare Ltd

Thomas Gozes
One real estate SPRL

Nina Gozes
Intel Corporation

Iliana Gozes
Tel Aviv University

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory