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Wrong Illac Diaz?

Illac Angelo Diaz

Executive Director

Shelter Foundation

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Shelter Foundation

Company Description

In addition to this, the Shelter Foundation aims to make the international problem of procuration more and more a public issue and to search for opportunities on a social-political level in order to fight this form of modern slavery. In this respect, the coope... more

Find other employees at this company (161)

Background Information

Employment History

Graduate Student

MIT


Affiliations

Liter of Light

Founder


MyShelter Foundation

Founder


Khalili

Founder


Litre of Light Foundation

Founder


The Plastic Bank

Board Member


Light and My Shelter Foundation

Founder


The Harvard Kennedy Schooland

Masons Fellow


Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Humphrey Fellow


Centro­Migrante

Founder


Education

Masters Degree

Public Administration

Harvard Kennedy School


Masters Degree

Social Entrepreneurship

Asian Institute of Management


Masters Degree

Urban Studies and Planning

Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Web References(86 Total References)


Earthbag Clinic

www.earthbagbuilding.com [cached]

Illac Diaz, founder of MyShelter Foundation, told Sun.
tar Bacolod the foundation's aim is to provide housing units as they recognized the growing global need for housing with the country's current population boom. Diaz narrated his trip to California and India to learn the earthbag shelter system to create the first structure. He said the problem can be addressed by using the potentials of earth construction. "Our mission is to create and implement innovative solutions for more affordable transitional housing for migrant populations and create sustainable communities that will advance the welfare of the individual and their families," he said. The earthbag shelter system is a low-cost alternative that would use the materials of war (sandbags and barbed wire) to create a safe structure in most regions - without harming the forest. Diaz added this ancient system would utilize minimum amounts of purchased product and maximum amounts of free earth, maximizing potential of available resources by combining it with progressive technologies. He said it would also encourage community activity by working together to put up low-cost, educational institutions, which are easy to build. "This structure is also capable of self-insulating, thus, decreasing the need to use electricity," he noted. Because of this alternative, saving hundreds of thousands for such structure would mean more money to be allocated for other government priority projects, said Diaz. "This is more environmental, sustainable and economical," he said. Diaz further said the earthbag shelter system, which provides a dome home structure, is very durable against typhoons. "Every three quarter of the year the Visayas area is widely hit by major typhoons and every debt of several Filipino families has incurred a total of P40 million worth of damages which resulted to loans and more debts," he said. "We could not afford seeing them every typhoon season where they would result to more debts to fix their houses and start a new life again." The first structure of earthbag shelter system, Diaz said, was built in Escalante City with a 45-square meter dome house structure that currently serves as a medical clinic. The system uses 80 percent earth, cement, sand, sugar bagasse and sulfur adobe-strong compound which makes it 100 percent more durable, he said. "It is an elongated bricks system mold in sugarcane sacks. The structure was built within 30 days," he said. In the near future, with the help of the government for funding, Diaz hoped to build mass structure of earthbag shelter system that would answer the housing problem of the country. I instantly recognized it from the television shows I've seen where Illac Diaz (the proponent of the dome house) was shown coming out of its door unto the gravel yard.


partnershipsagainstpoverty.org

Illac Angelo Diaz, Executive Director, MyShelter Foundation, Philippines
Illac Diaz is a former corporate executive who has since gone on to establish several foundations that provide sustainable solutions to societal problems. He is the executive director of MyShelter Foundation, a non-profit organization which has been engaged in improving the lives of many Filipinos through the creation of sustainable solutions for using recycled materials for the building of clinics and classrooms in rural areas. Diaz has a Masters in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School and finished previously the Special Program in Urban and Regional Studies (SPURS) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was recognized as one of the Global Leaders by the World Economic Forum, Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World by the Jaycees International, and is an Ernst and Young Innovation Entrepreneur of the Year. He has returned to the Philippines to apply and disseminate his research in needy communities throughout the country.


www.ooac.org

Illac Angelo Diaz, Architecture for Humanity Manila President
Illac Diaz is a former corporate executive who has since gone on to establish several foundations that provide sustainable solutions to societal problems. He is the executive director of MyShelter Foundation, a non-profit organization which has been engaged in improving the lives of many Filipinos through the creation of sustainable solutions for using recycled materials for the building of clinics and classrooms in rural areas. Diaz holds Masters in Public Administration degree from the Harvard Kennedy School. He also completed the Special Program in Urban and Regional Studies (SPURS) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was recognized as one of the Global Leaders by the World Economic Forum, Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World by the Jaycees International, and is an Ernst and Young Innovation Entrepreneur of the Year. He has returned to the Philippines to apply and disseminate his research in needy communities throughout the country.


plasticbank.org

Illac Diaz
Illac Diaz is a leading Filipino businessman deeply engaged in catalyzing solutions to social, economic and environmental challenges. A former corporate executive, Illac has established several foundations that make sustainability the key to solving social problems. Today, Illac is Executive Director at MyShelter Foundation, a non-profit organization that improves the lives of many Filipinos by fostering the use of recycled materials to build clinics and classrooms in rural areas. MyShelter Foundation was conceived when Illac was trying to help solve the housing problem in the province of Negros Occidental, the sugar growing capital of the Philippines. He noticed the shortage of classrooms in the area and came upon the idea of "upcycling" the endless supply of waste plastic soda bottles from the municipal landfill into ultra-low cost building material. Using local labor meant that money could be kept within the community and spent on building more cost-effective classrooms. MyShelter Foundation set up a construction business to build upcycled schools, clinics, and community centers while channeling the savings to increase teachers' wages and bring computer technology to schools. One of upcycling's global successes is the Liter of Light project where used soda bottles, bleach and contact cement combine to bring daylight through the roofs of low-income communities around the world. Illac has a Masters in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School and completed the Special Program in Urban and Regional Studies (SPURS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. An Ernst and Young Innovation Entrepreneur of the Year, Illac was recognized as a Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and ranked among Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World by the Jaycees International. He lives and works in the Philippines sharing his research in communities throughout the country.


Earthbag House May Solve Filipino Problems

earthbagbuilding.com [cached]

But it was a young Filipino entrepreneur, Illac Diaz, who found Khalili's architectural innovations suitable for the Philippines, where, even without natural and man-made disasters, housing and classroom shortages are acute.Mentored by Khalili himself, Diaz is showing that the Earthbag Construction System is proving to be fast, inexpensive, sturdy and environmentally friendly.
But it was a young Filipino entrepreneur, Illac Diaz, who found Khalili's architectural innovations suitable for the Philippines, where, even without natural and man-made disasters, housing and classroom shortages are acute.Mentored by Khalili himself, Diaz is showing that the Earthbag Construction System is proving to be fast, inexpensive, sturdy and environmentally friendly. Diaz is the Executive Director of My Shelter Foundation, which looks for 'uncommon solutions for common problems'. He pointed out that the old Filipino construction technologies, using wood, cane, stones and other forest products, are no longer suitable and practical given the country's severe deforestation. Diaz first put the construction innovation on display by building a model house made of 'mud' in Escalante, Negros Occidental, in the central Philippines in honour of a recently deceased aunt who had lived there. Then, realising many public school children in the Philippines, particularly those farthest from the capital city of Manila, barely had roofs over their heads as they attended classes, Diaz decided to launch a school building campaign that he hoped would be adopted elsewhere. Diaz noted that the current design for Philippine school buildings was both uncomfortable for students and energy inefficient. Classrooms were hot and dimly lit so electric light bulbs were needed. The discomfort of the classroom may have been contributing to the high student dropout rates, he thought. An architectural impression of a completed school's design. MyShelter Foundation With domed or arched roofs, whose weights are supported by the walls, Diaz's school buildings - and houses - have no pillars. They also do not use hollow blocks. Steel drums are employed to shape and provide the opening for rounded windows and pipes are strategically placed to let air in and out to cool the structures. A little cement is used in some places just to 'glue' things together. The first three-room school that My Shelter Foundation built in Siargao, in collaboration with the Abakada Foundation (a Filipino non-government organisation focusing on the provision of educational facilities in rural areas) has cost about 150 000 Pesos, but Diaz expects the price to fall even further as he and his partners become more experienced in the use of the technology. The project took less than a month to complete. Diaz, who has patented the construction technology, said conventional building techniques 'did not take into account nature'. He said they destroyed the environment, polluted the water, and required a lot of energy for cooling because 'metal sheet roofing generates a lot of heat', requiring air-conditioners or electric fans. Diaz said fire, in fact, 'cooked the soil and turned it into brick', strengthening the material in much the same way heat makes pottery stronger. Supposedly better able to withstand typhoons and earthquakes too, Diaz said the structures could last 50 years or more, and are then recyclable. They can remain where they are so dust can return to dust, even without help from humans, he said.


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