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2013-12-27T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Homer Floyd?

Mr. Homer C. Floyd

Football Player

University of Kansas

HQ Phone: (913) 588-5000

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University of Kansas

3901 Rainbow Boulevard

Kansas City, Kansas 66160

United States

Company Description

Opened in 1866, the University of Kansas ( www.ku.edu) is a comprehensive public teaching and research institution with 29,272 students and more than 2,100 faculty members. The university offers more than 40 nationally ranked academic programs, including ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

WHERE Pennsylvania Bar Institute

Executive Director Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission

National Latino Peace Officers Association

Mayor Bracey

Executive Director

Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission

Affiliations

Individual Member
International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies

Senior Advisor
Stradley Ronon Stevens & Young , LLP

Board Member
Squarespace Inc

Education

KU degree

bachelor's degree

University of Kansas

bachelor's degree

education

KU

Web References (186 Total References)


Former KU football captain Homer ...

www2.kusports.com [cached]

Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality

The personal rejections - "You can't eat here. "You and your wife can't live here. - based on nothing but the color of his skin happened more than 50 years ago, but those sorts of wounds never age, never fully heal. It's how Homer Floyd, the best football player at Kansas University when Wilt Chamberlain was the best basketball player, used those emotional wounds to make the world a better place and turned him into an iconic civil rights figure.


Former Kansas University football player ...

www2.kusports.com [cached]

Former Kansas University football player Homer Floyd, right, and oldest son J.C. pose during Homer's standout KU career. Floyd, who was a co-captain and led KU in rushing and tackles several times from 1956 to 1958, dedicated his post-KU career to promoting civil rights.

Stories this photo appears in: Tease photo
Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality
The personal rejections - "You can't eat here. "You and your wife can't live here. - based on nothing but the color of his skin happened more than 50 years ago, but those sorts of wounds never age, never fully heal. It's how Homer Floyd, the best football player at Kansas University when Wilt Chamberlain was the best basketball player, used those emotional wounds to make the world a better place and turned him into an iconic civil rights figure.
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Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality December 26, 2013


Tease photo | Former KU football ...

www2.kusports.com [cached]

Tease photo | Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality | 11 comments | Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality December 26, 2013

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Tease photo | Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality | 11 comments | Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality December 26, 2013
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Former KU football captain Homer Floyd spends career pushing for social equality
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Former Kansas University football player Homer Floyd, right, and oldest son J.C. pose during Homer's standout KU career. Floyd, who was a co-captain and led KU in rushing and tackles several times from 1956 to 1958, dedicated his post-KU career to promoting civil rights.
Former Kansas University football player Homer Floyd, right, and oldest son J.C. pose during Homer's standout KU career. Floyd, who was a co-captain and led KU in rushing and tackles several times from 1956 to 1958, dedicated his post-KU career to promoting civil rights.
...
It's how Homer Floyd, the best football player at Kansas University when Wilt Chamberlain was the best basketball player, used those emotional wounds to make the world a better place and turned him into an iconic civil rights figure.
Honored this past fall by his alma mater's Black Alumni Chapter's African-American Leaders and Innovators Project, Floyd retired in Jan. 2011 after 41 years as director of the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission.
"There were three theaters in town," Floyd, 77, said of Lawrence in the mid-to-late 1950s. "Two had balconies and one didn't. African-Americans had to sit in the balcony."
KU chancellor Franklin D. Murphy, Floyd said, didn't like that.
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"He sent out an edict that if the theaters didn't eliminate that segregation practice he would declare the theaters off-limits to all students, and he would rent movies and show them on campus for free," said Floyd, who lives near Harrisburg, Pa. "That was one of the things that ended segregation in Lawrence."
There were still a few restaurants practicing segregation, Floyd said. He credited "Wilt's presence" as a factor in them integrating.
"I could walk in a restaurant and nobody knew me," said Floyd, who led KU in rushing three times (1956-58) and tackles "two or three seasons," as a safety, his anonymity preserved by a helmet and the fact he wasn't a 7-footer.
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Floyd remembered having to stay in a different hotel from white teammates in Fort Worth, Texas, where the Jayhawks played TCU. After he was cut by the Cleveland Browns, who already had Jim Brown and Bobby Mitchell carrying the football, and returned to Kansas City to find housing with his wife, Mattie, whom he wed as a senior in high school, a much deeper wound was split open.
"We had to stay at a hotel for two and a half, three weeks before we could find a place that would rent to us," Floyd said. "Those experiences put me in a position to want to do more than just talk about the problems."
Consequently, Floyd left $2,000 on the table in choosing a job with the Kansas Civil Rights Commission over one promoting beer for a brewing company.
"It hurt even more so with the kids, trying to explain to kids why they can't go in a restaurant or can't have access to this park or swimming pool, those kinds of things, it hurts," Floyd said. "Part of what I was looking at was not so much trying to get back at anybody, but to try to create a fair environment so everyone can prosper."
During his time with the Kansas Civil Rights Commission, Floyd shared a stage with Martin Luther King in the civil rights leader's final speaking engagement at a university campus, Jan. 19, 1968, at Kansas State.
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Among the names on the note: Homer C. Floyd.
During his 41 years in Pennsylvania, Floyd worked under six different governors from both political parties.
"A sense of fairness and justice," Floyd said. "That was largely what I was hoping for in trying to build an agency, build an organization, to make sure everybody had an equal chance. And in a democracy, that's what it promises."
Floyd expressed pride in the role the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission played in pushing for fair housing, fair pay for women in the workplace and equal opportunities for the disabled. He also worked on behalf of those unfairly treated based on age.
In many cases, Floyd said, Pennsylvania passed legislation on fairness issues well in an advance of the federal government.
KU 'terrific' experience
Floyd said that aside from isolated, hurtful incidents, none of which occurred within the football team, his experience as a student-athlete was "terrific. Absolutely."
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Floyd, from Massillon, Ohio, estimated he received scholarship offers from 50 schools.
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Ohio State's Woody Hayes had invited Floyd to sit on the sideline for many Buckeyes games, but according to Floyd, "he wasn't terribly enthusiastic about me getting married because he had to make different (housing) arrangements. Purdue, it was no problem for them, and it was no problem for KU."
Homer and Mattie, who died in 2007, were married 52 years, so giving up a Buckeyes helmet was the best trade Floyd ever made. He and Mattie had three children: J.C., Cheryl and Damon.
Floyd never played for a college coaching legend but did play for a high school coaching legend in both high school and college.
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"I always felt Mather was a really great coach and ahead of his time," Floyd said.
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"First of all, we've made great progress, there is no question about that," Floyd said.
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Floyd cited the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old African-American at the hand of George Zimmerman, who was acquitted a year-and-a-half later.
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"We are socialized along racial lines," Floyd said "White folks talk to white folks.
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Floyd explained how he believes minds too often are made up ahead of examining facts.
"If you look at it in the sense that you can have the same set of facts on an issue, but how you are socialized, you will view those facts differently," he said.
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Tackling it isn't as easy as it was for Floyd to tackle receivers and running backs.
"Part of our challenge to some extent is narrow that gap by recognizing there is diversity and we have to have experiences across racial and ethnic lines in order to understand," he said.
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As the story was told to Floyd, one influential member of the family wanted him to be named Homer Floyd.
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With that spirit of compromise hard-wired in his DNA, maybe Floyd was destined to become a difference maker capable of drawing harmony out of discord.
YouTube
Homer Floyd interview


HARRISBURG, Pa., Jan. 14, 2011 ...

www.gospeltruthmagazine.com [cached]

HARRISBURG, Pa., Jan. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Governor Edward G. Rendell today announced the retirement of Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission Executive Director Homer C. Floyd, who has led the agency since 1970.

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"Homer Floyd has seen our commonwealth and our nation through times of tremendous progress in civil rights," Governor Edward G. Rendell said.
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Floyd's career in civil rights enforcement began in the early 1960s in the Midwest after he made his mark as a football player at the University of Kansas, where he was sometimes not allowed to eat in the same restaurants or stay in the same hotels as his white teammates when they traveled. He came to the commission in February 1970, after serving in similar positions at local and regional civil rights agencies and helping to establish policies and procedures in the newly-formed U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. "We have achieved tremendous civil rights milestones under Homer Floyd's leadership," said Stephen A. Glassman, commission chairman.
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"From landmark sex discrimination cases in the 1970s and 80s that helped level the playing field for women in the workplace, to a $6.4 million settlement in the 1990s that improved access to public services for people with disabilities, the agency's work under Homer Floyd has upheld the rights and improved the lives of millions of Pennsylvanians.
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"But progress under Homer Floyd's leadership has been substantial, and achieved largely through his tenacious commitment to the goal of protecting the civil rights of all Pennsylvanians. Floyd, who lives in Harrisburg, has recently been recognized for lifetime achievements in civil rights and equal opportunity by the EEOC, the Pa. Chapter of the NAACP, the International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies and a number of other civic and professional organizations.


PAD: Right-Wing Watch

www.padnet.org [cached]

Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission Executive Director Homer C. Floyd spoke about "Stop the Hate.

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