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Hiroo Kanamori

Teacher

California-Institute

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

California Institute

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Background Information

Employment History

Union Frontiers of Geophysics Lecture


German Choreographer and Artistic Director Pina Bausch, Director

Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch GmbH


Thorne Lay


Rundle Turcotte and Marone


Affiliations

California Institute of Technology

Professor Emeritus


Earth

Advisor


CUREE

CUREE Member


University of Tokyo

Japanese Chemist Doctor Hiroo Inokuchi, A Professor Emeritus


Institute for Molecular Science

Japanese Chemist Doctor Hiroo Inokuchi, A Professor Emeritus


Education

Ph.D.


PhD

University of Tokyo


undergraduate degree

University of Tokyo


Web References(99 Total References)


www.therobertabondarfoundation.org

Tag Archives: Hiroo Kanamori
On October 17, 1936, Japanese geophysicist Hiroo Kanamori was born. Recipient of many prizes and awards, he has spent his life investigating the magnitude and energy releases of great earthquakes. Like Charles Richter, Kanamori has taught at the California Institute ... Continue reading →


www.therobertabondarfoundation.org [cached]

On October 17, 1936, Japanese geophysicist Hiroo Kanamori was born.
Recipient of many prizes and awards, he has spent his life investigating the magnitude and energy releases of great earthquakes. Like Charles Richter, Kanamori has taught at the California Institute ... Continue reading →


www.earth-planets-space.org

Hiroo Kanamori
California Institute of Technology, U.S.A.


www.kyocera.co.uk [cached]

Dr. Hiroo Kanamori (Japan, October 17, 1936)
Geophysicist Professor Emeritus, California Institute of Technology Dr. Hiroo Kanamori has made an epoch-making progress on the study of great earthquakes through the establishment of analytical method to understand quantitatively all over the rupture process of a great earthquake making full use of seismogram. This study has ushered in a new era in seismology and had a significant impact on the development of geophysics. He has made practical proposals on how to mitigate earthquake hazards based on the knowledge gained through basic studies and contributed to building up and conducting earthquake hazard mitigation systems.


www.therobertabondarfoundation.org

On October 17, 1936, Japanese geophysicist Hiroo Kanamori was born.
Recipient of many prizes and awards, he has spent his life investigating the magnitude and energy releases of great earthquakes. Like Charles Richter, Kanamori has taught at the California Institute of Technology. The original Richter Scale was published in 1935 and designed for measuring the size of earthquakes in southern California. The scale rates an earthquake calculated from data from magnitude of the seismic surface wave and the ground motion measured at a specific distance from the quake's centre. It is valid only within certain frequency and distance ranges. Born in a land of very large earthquakes, Kanamori recognized that a scale was required to measure larger earthquakes whose wave energy saturated or overwhelmed the seismic recording equipment of the mid-20thcentury. Of special concern were earthquakes that occurred the length of very long fault lines. The worst earthquakes have slow waves that last longer… that can produce tsunamis that ripple across oceans. With Caltech colleague Thomas C Hanks, Kanamori spent well over a decade of work examining the acute moment of earthquake rupture. Caltech professor emeritus and Kyoto Prize honoree, Kanamori continues to pursue measurement research on earthquake foreshocks, working for the day when long-period waves lead to an earthquake early warning system. His work has contributed to a global positioning system network that detects fault slip events so small they do not produce destructive waves, a real-time tsunami warning system, and proposals for reducing seismic hazards. Kanamori envisions "smart" technologies connected to an earthquake early warning system such as buildings that shut off gas and electricity and deliver elevators to the next floor, releasing people so they are able to reach safety. The smallest fault slip increases our knowledge of our ever-changing planet. B Bondar / Real World Content Advantage This entry was posted in On This Day and tagged Hiroo Kanamori, Kyoto Prize, Moment-Magnitude Scale, October 17, On This Day, The Roberta Bondar Foundation. Bookmark the permalink.


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