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This profile was last updated on 7/23/01  and contains information from public web pages.

Dr. Hermann Esterbauer

Wrong Dr. Hermann Esterbauer?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Professor of Biochemistry and the Head
    Institute of Biochemistry of the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz
  • Editorial Boards
    Free Radical Research Communications
  • Professor of Biochemistry and the Head
    Institute of Biochemistry of the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz in Austria

Education

  • Ph.D.
Web References
Treatment of Hyper Cholesterol with Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine in China
www.ontcm.com, 23 July 2001 [cached]
Hermann Esterbauer, Ph.D. is a professor of biochemistry and the Head of the Institute of Biochemistry of the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz in Austria.He serves on the Editorial Boards of Free Radical Research Communications, Biochemical Journal, Amino Acids, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, and Journal of Biotechnology.
...
Passwater: Dr. Esterbauer, when did you become interested in vitamin E research?
Esterbauer: A long time ago.
...
Esterbauer: The University of Graz has a long tradition in lipid and lipoprotein research, and Prof. Erwin Schauenstein, the supervisor of my Ph.D. thesis, had the idea that perhaps some of the lipid oxidation products formed endogenously or ingested with food have a biological or pathological importance.
...
Esterbauer: In the early 1980s, the groups of Dr. Daniel Steinberg in La Jolla and Dr. Guy Chisolm in Cleveland published some remarkable papers on implications of the oxidation of LDL in atherosclerosis. [2-5] We were interested in whether we could identify some substances in oxidized LDL which we had isolated a long time ago from oxidized linoleic acid.
...
Esterbauer: Cholesterol is a lipid, i. e., a fat-soluble compound.
...
Esterbauer: Embedded in the LDL shell is also a large protein termed apolipoprotein B. The Nobel Price winners, Dr. Joseph Goldstein and Dr. Michael Brown, discovered that a specific receptor (termed LDL-receptor) that can recognize apolipoprotein B of LDL is present at the surface of most cells in our body.
...
Esterbauer: I would like to have X-ray eyes and be able to actually see an oxidized LDL particle.
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Esterbauer: Pathological, microscopic and histochemical studies have shown that the fatty streak and plaques which form in the intima region of the major arteries are mainly made up of cells so altered in their appearance by engulfed LDL cholesterol that they are known as foam cells.
...
Esterbauer: Foam cells develop in an interior layer of the artery called the intima.
...
Esterbauer: The main reason has to do with the difference in pressure of the circulating blood in each.
...
Esterbauer: I can only refer to our studies on the protection of LDL by antioxidants.
...
Esterbauer: This is a very kind comment by them.
...
Esterbauer: As I mentioned earlier, the efficacy of vitamin E to protect LDL against oxidation varies strongly between individuals, and we investigate presently the underlying reasons.Perhaps, genetic factors play an important role besides dietary factors.Another project of my group deals with the development of ELISAs (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) for measuring oxidized LDL and other proteins damaged by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation in plasma, tissue and single cells.As you know, many researchers believe that oxidative stress is a major cause of many diseases.If this is so, assays to measure oxidatively damaged proteins should have a prognostic and diagnostic value.
Passwater: Thank you Professor Esterbauer for your lucid explanations in explaining your research to us.
Vitamin E and Carotenoids Protect Arteries from Cholesterol Deposits:
www.drpasswater.com, 16 May 1992 [cached]
Hermann Esterbauer, Ph.D. is a professor of biochemistry and the Head of the Institute of Biochemistry of the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz in Austria. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Free Radical Research Communications, Biochemical Journal, Amino Acids, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, and Journal of Biotechnology.
Dr. Esterbauer's major fields of research are free radical reactions and lipid peroxidation in health and disease, particularly atherosclerosis, and the roles of antioxidants in health and in preventing disease.
...
This month I have the pleasure of bringing Dr. Esterbauer's research to your attention, and next month, the research that started it all, that of Dr. Daniel Steinberg's group.
Passwater: Dr. Esterbauer, when did you become interested in vitamin E research?
...
Esterbauer: A long time ago.
...
Esterbauer: The University of Graz has a long tradition in lipid and lipoprotein research, and Prof. Erwin Schauenstein, the supervisor of my Ph.D. thesis, had the idea that perhaps some of the lipid oxidation products formed endogenously or ingested with food have a biological or pathological importance.
...
Esterbauer: In the early 1980s, the groups of Dr. Daniel Steinberg in La Jolla and Dr. Guy Chisolm in Cleveland published some remarkable papers on implications of the oxidation of LDL in atherosclerosis. [2-5] We were interested in whether we could identify some substances in oxidized LDL which we had isolated a long time ago from oxidized linoleic acid.
...
Esterbauer: Cholesterol is a lipid, i. e., a fat-soluble compound.
...
Esterbauer: Embedded in the LDL shell is also a large protein termed apolipoprotein B. The Nobel Price winners, Dr. Joseph Goldstein and Dr. Michael Brown, discovered that a specific receptor (termed LDL-receptor) that can recognize apolipoprotein B of LDL is present at the surface of most cells in our body.
...
Esterbauer: I would like to have X-ray eyes and be able to actually see an oxidized LDL particle.
...
Esterbauer: Pathological, microscopic and histochemical studies have shown that the fatty streak and plaques which form in the intima region of the major arteries are mainly made up of cells so altered in their appearance by engulfed LDL cholesterol that they are known as foam cells.
...
Esterbauer: Foam cells develop in an interior layer of the artery called the intima.
...
Esterbauer: The main reason has to do with the difference in pressure of the circulating blood in each.
...
Esterbauer: I can only refer to our studies on the protection of LDL by antioxidants.
...
Esterbauer: This is a very kind comment by them.
...
Esterbauer: As I mentioned earlier, the efficacy of vitamin E to protect LDL against oxidation varies strongly between individuals, and we investigate presently the underlying reasons. Perhaps, genetic factors play an important role besides dietary factors. Another project of my group deals with the development of ELISAs (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) for measuring oxidized LDL and other proteins damaged by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation in plasma, tissue and single cells. As you know, many researchers believe that oxidative stress is a major cause of many diseases. If this is so, assays to measure oxidatively damaged proteins should have a prognostic and diagnostic value.
Passwater: Thank you Professor Esterbauer for your lucid explanations in explaining your research to us.
...
Esterbauer, H.; Striegl, G.; Puhl, H.; Oberreither, S.; Rotheneder, M; El-Saadani, M. and Jurgens, G. Ann.
...
Esterbauer, H.; Jurgens, G.; Quehenberger, O. and Koller, E. J. Lipid Res.
...
Dieber-Rotheneder, M.; Puhl, H.; Waeg, G.; Striegl, G. and Esterbauer, H. J. Lipid Res. 32:1325-32 (1991)
Vitamin E and Carotenoids Protect Arteries from Cholesterol Deposits:
www.nutritionfocus.com, 21 Mar 2000 [cached]
Vitamin E and Carotenoids Protect Arteries From Cholesterol Deposits: An Interview With Dr. Hermann Esterbauer
...
Hermann Esterbauer, Ph.D. is a professor of biochemistry and the Head of the Institute of Biochemistry of the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz in Austria.He serves on the Editorial Boards of Free Radical Research Communications, Biochemical Journal, Amino Acids, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, and Journal of Biotechnology.
Dr. Esterbauer's major fields of research are free radical reactions and lipid peroxidation in health and disease, particularly atherosclerosis, and the roles of antioxidants in health and in preventing disease.
The interest in the role of vitamin E and carotenoids in the reduction of heart disease by their preventing oxidation of low density lipoproteins continues to grow.This is virtually the title the ground-breaking report in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences in 1989 by Dr. Hermann Esterbauer. [1] Many scientists are now following up on this relationship.I have been interviewing the major scientists involved in this important research over the past several months.I covered the background of vitamin E and free radicals, but now I will begin to tie everything together in the next two interviews.
...
Passwater: Dr. Esterbauer, when did you become interested in vitamin E research?
...
Esterbauer: A long time ago.In the early 1960s I did my Ph.D. thesis on autoxidation of fatty acids contained in plant oils.Naturally, this evoked my interest in vitamin E as an antioxidative factor preventing rancidity.Later on, when we studied lipid peroxidation induced by xenobiotics in liver and liver cells, we realized, as many other investigators did, that vitamin E is perhaps one of the most important components in cell membranes protecting membrane lipids against oxidative damage by free radicals.
Passwater: What attracted your interest to this field of research?
...
Esterbauer: The University of Graz has a long tradition in lipid and lipoprotein research, and Prof. Erwin Schauenstein, the supervisor of my Ph.D. thesis, had the idea that perhaps some of the lipid oxidation products formed endogenously or ingested with food have a biological or pathological importance.
...
Esterbauer: In the early 1980s, the groups of Dr. Daniel Steinberg in La Jolla and Dr. Guy Chisolm in Cleveland published some remarkable papers on implications of the oxidation of LDL in atherosclerosis. [2-5] We were interested in whether we could identify some substances in oxidized LDL which we had isolated a long time ago from oxidized linoleic acid.
...
Esterbauer: Cholesterol is a lipid, i. e., a fat-soluble compound.Therefore, cholesterol is not soluble in blood, which is a water-based fluid.To overcome this incompatibility, the body has designed a means to transport this fat-soluble compound inside water compatible particles called lipoproteins.There are several lipoproteins, but the two with which we are most interested are the low density lipoproteins (LDL and the high-density lipoproteins (HDL).In lay terms, LDL is associated with "bad" cholesterol and HDL is associated with "good" cholesterol.LDL primarily carries cholesterol from where it is manufactured in the liver to various cells that need cholesterol.HDL primarily carries excess cholesterol back to the liver.
...
Esterbauer: Embedded in the LDL shell is also a large protein termed apolipoprotein B. The Nobel Price winners, Dr. Joseph Goldstein and Dr. Michael Brown, discovered that a specific receptor (termed LDL-receptor) that can recognize apolipoprotein B of LDL is present at the surface of most cells in our body.
...
Esterbauer: I would like to have X-ray eyes and be able to actually see an oxidized LDL particle.From the chemical analyses which we made, it seems clear that it must look ugly, the beautiful architecture of normal LDL no longer exists.The antioxidants are destroyed, the polyunsaturated fatty acids and even the cholesterol moiety are heavily oxidized and partly polymerized.A large number of smaller and highly reactive break-down products segregate from the oxidizing lipids and emanate from the particle.
...
Esterbauer: Pathological, microscopic and histochemical studies have shown that the fatty streak and plaques which form in the intima region of the major arteries are mainly made up of cells so altered in their appearance by engulfed LDL cholesterol that they are known as foam cells.Most of these foam cells develop from macrophages, which again stem from more general-purpose white blood cells called monocytes.The monocytes immigrate from the circulating blood into the arterial wall.
For a long time it was an absolute mystery how the macrophages engulf so much cholesterol.If macrophages were fed with normal LDL, even in high concentration, they did not become overloaded with cholesterol, nor did they develop to foam cells.A milestone was the discovery published by Dr. Daniel Steinberg's group in 1984 that macrophages fed with oxidized-LDL avidly took up this material and develop to foam cells.
...
Esterbauer: Foam cells develop in an interior layer of the artery called the intima.It is important to realize that the foam cells develop in the arterial intima itself from resident macrophages.Foam cells do not form in the bloodstream as an immigration of foam cells from the circulation into the arterial wall is not possible.On the contrary, there is some evidence that foam cells have the capacity to emigrate from the arterial intima into the bloodstream.
...
Esterbauer: The main reason has to do with the difference in pressure of the circulating blood in each.The lower blood pressure in veins causes less LDL infiltration into vein walls, than the higher pressure in arteries cause LDL infiltration into artery walls.Also, monocytes adhere to vein surfaces (endothelium) less than artery surfaces.Therefore, foam cells accumulate in arteries and not veins because arteries have more monocytes adhering on the artery surfaces and because the higher blood pressure causes infiltration of LDL.
The present opinion is that normal LDL which is continuously infiltrated into the intima layer of arteries encounter there an "oxidative stress" This oxidative stress is most likely mediated by activated macrophages which have been recruited at endothelial cells at the sites of injury to the lining of the artery.
...
Esterbauer: I can only refer to our studies on the protection of LDL by antioxidants.One can isolate LDL from the blood and determine its oxidation resistance.One will always observe that LDL is only oxidized when it has lost its antioxidants.The first defense line is alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol (vitamin E), and the last defense line is the carotenoids, mainly beta-carotene.
...
Esterbauer: This is a very kind comment by them.During this interview I have already mentioned several prominent scientists who contributed much more to the LDL oxidation theory of atherosclerosis than I did.Our major contribution, perhaps, was that we introduced quantitative clinical-chemical assays, which enable us and others to measure oxidation resistance of LDL and the protective effect of antioxidants.We have now so many biochemical and epidemiological evidence in support of the oxidation theory, what we need is a support by experimental animal studies, clinical studies and intervention trials.
...
Esterbauer: As I mentioned earlier, the efficacy of vitamin E to protect LDL against oxidation varies strongly between individuals, and we investigate presently the underlying reasons.Perhaps, genetic factors play an important role besides dietary factors.Another project of my group deals with the development of ELISAs (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) for measuring oxidized LDL and other proteins damaged by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation in plasma, tissue and single cells.As you know, many researchers believe that oxidative stress is a major cause of many diseases.If this is so, assays to measure oxidatively damaged proteins should have a prognostic and diagnostic value.
Passwater: Thank you Professor Esterbauer for your lucid explanations in explaining your research to us.
...
Esterbauer, H.; Striegl, G.; Puhl, H.; Oberreither, S.; Rotheneder, M; El-Saadani, M. and Jurgens, G. Ann.
...
Esterbauer, H.; Jurgens, G.; Quehenberger, O. and Koller, E. J. Lipid Res.
...
Dieber-Rotheneder, M.; Puhl, H.; Waeg, G.; Striegl, G. and Esterbauer, H. J. Lipid Res.32:1325-32 (1991)
11. Effects of D-alpha-tocopherol supplementation on experimentally induced primate atherosclerosis.
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