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Wrong Herman Jones?

Herman Jones

Associate Dean for Student Affairs

OU Medical School

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

OU Medical School

Background Information

Employment History

James H. Little Professor of Neurology

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center


Consultant

Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics


Web References(17 Total References)


www.kfor.com

"This is the medical version of an NFL Draft," said Dr. Herman Jones, Associate Dean for Student Affairs at OU Medical School.
Dr. Jones said this is career-making, and in some situations, career breaking. Back in November students began traveling the country, interviewing at different residency programs for their chosen specialty. "The students rank in preference the location and type of program they'd like to have and the residency programs rank their students by preference and a computer algorithm attempts to link those up," Dr. Jones said. Even after four years of medical school, Dr. Jones said some students don't match with a program at all. Once the student becomes an official resident at a program, Dr. Jones said they make between $30,000 and $45,000 a year until they complete their training.


www.kfor.com

"This is the medical version of an NFL Draft," said Dr. Herman Jones, Associate Dean for Student Affairs at OU Medical School.
Dr. Jones said this is career-making, and in some situations, career breaking. Back in November students began traveling the country, interviewing at different residency programs for their chosen specialty. "The students rank in preference the location and type of program they'd like to have and the residency programs rank their students by preference and a computer algorithm attempts to link those up," Dr. Jones said. Even after four years of medical school, Dr. Jones said some students don't match with a program at all. Once the student becomes an official resident at a program, Dr. Jones said they make between $30,000 and $45,000 a year until they complete their training.


www.OUCancer.org

Herman Jones,Ph.D., is Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry.
A Neuropsychologist, he works in the areas of neurobehavior and the psychological aspects of neurologic disease. Special areas of interest include pseudoneurologic somatization and intracarotid amytal testing. He serves as a resource for postdoctoral fellows


www.OUCancer.org

Herman E. Jones, Ph.D.
Supervisor, Psychology Internship Training Program (Primary Appointment: Department of Neurology).


www.tulsaworld.com

Methamphetamine is like the most pleasurable or pleasant thing a person is drawn to times 10, said Herman Jones, a neuropsychologist with oU Physicians.
The drug affects levels of a brain neurochemical called dopamine. Dopamine acts as the brain’s reward system and is released during sex, after consuming food, for motor function and to motivate certain behaviors. Meth causes high amounts of dopamine to collect in the brain, causing a rush of euphoria, Jones said. It reinforces its own use and leaves the user wanting more. “This isn’t just a weakness of spirit; it’s much stronger than that,†he said. “For a good number of users, it isn’t a drug that you try once and just walk away.â€


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