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This profile was last updated on 6/19/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Henry C. Lin

Wrong Dr. Henry C. Lin?

Chiropractor

Cupertino Wellness Chiropractic
19028 Stevens Creek Blvd.
Cupertino, California 95014
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • MD
  • bachelor's degree
    Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at the City College of New York
48 Total References
Web References
Cupertino Wellness Chiropractic - Chiropractor In Cupertino, CA USA :: Home
www.drlinchiro.com, 11 July 2013 [cached]
New second office opening announcement !! Dr. Henry Lin and his team is serving the Santa Clara community with his new office
...
Dr. Henry Lin is committed to bringing you better health and a better way of life by teaching and practicing the true principles of chiropractic wellness care.
Patients seeking treatment at Cupertino Wellness Chiropractic with Dr. Henry Lin are assured of receiving only the finest quality care through the use of modern chiropractic equipment and technology. Dr. Henry Lin and the staff have a genuine concern for your well-being!
If you are new to our website, please feel free to discover and learn about chiropractic wellness. If you are interested in starting your journey towards wellness please subscribe to our award winning newsletter. If you are already a newsletter subscriber, please explore the member wellness section of our website for wellness articles, resources, and health facts---specifically targeted by Dr. Henry Lin to your wellness needs and interests.
It's Your Life... Live it in Health!
Proudly serving the community of Cupertino, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale and West San Jose.
Dr. Henry Lin, Cupertino & Santa Clara Chiropractor | Great America Chiropractic at Santa Clara | 408-855-8608
| Cupertino Wellness Chiropractic | 408-996-9686
Featured Articles Toggle Articles
Dumping Syndrome - aboutGIMotility.org
www.aboutgimotility.org, 16 July 2013 [cached]
Adapted from IFFGD publication #539 by Carol Rees Parrish, R.D., M.S., Nutrition Support Specialist, University of Virginia Health System; Henry C. Lin, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Southern California; and Henry Parkman, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine
Enslaved By Debt excerpted from the book Web of Debt The Shocking Truth About Our Money System And How We Can Break Free by Ellen Hodgson Brown
www.thirdworldtraveler.com, 1 Jan 2011 [cached]
Professor Henry C. K. Liu, Chinese American economist
...
According to Henry Liu, writing in The Asia Times Mexico's mistake was in keeping its currency freely convertible into dollars, requiring it to keep enough dollar reserves to buy back the pesos of anyone wanting to sell.
MDRNA - Investor Relations Nastech - Nastech - News Release
phx.corporate-ir.net, 24 May 2004 [cached]
The license agreement with Cedars-Sinai is related to research work directed by Henry C. Lin, M.D., former Director of the Gastrointestinal Motility Program and Section of Nutrition at Cedars- Sinai. Dr. Lin is currently on the Faculty at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. Since before 1995, Dr. Lin's laboratory has been studying the key role played by PYY in the postprandial response to food and the manner in which it controls gastrointestinal physiology. PYY is integral to nutrient-triggered feedback that is involved in intestinal transit, hunger, and satiety.
The agreement includes issued patent # 6,558,708, which claims a priority date from an original application filed May 17, 1995, and which, in part, is directed to inducing satiety in a mammal by administering peptide YY or functional analogs. This is the only currently issued U.S. patent claiming the use of PYY or PYY analogs for inducing satiety. The license also includes additional U.S. and foreign patent applications, continuations, technology, and know-how related to PYY within CSMC under the direction of Dr. Lin.
Irritable bowel syndrome
fmscommunity.org [cached]
But according to gastrointestinal motility specialist Henry C. Lin, associate professor of medicine in the Keck School of Medicine of USC, the idea of a bacterial origin of IBS represents a major change in thinking.
Writing in the Aug. 18 issue of JAMA, Lin proposed that ordinary bacteria normally confined to the large intestine may expand into the small intestine, prompting uncomfortable bloating and gas after meals, a change in bowel movements as well as an immune response that may account for the flu-like illness so common in the IBS patient, including such debilitating symptoms as headaches, muscle and joint pains and chronic fatigue.
...
For more than a dozen years, Lin has searched for a common thread to account for the symptoms in IBS. Studies indicate 92 percent of IBS patients report bloating after they eat, a symptom he saw again and again in his patients.
While many physicians believe that IBS-related bloating is perceived and not real, Lin noted that recent studies of IBS patients show that their abdomens do become measurably more distended than those of healthy patients.
With the symptom of post-meal bloating in mind, Lin began the quest for the cause of IBS by considering the problem of increased intestinal gas.
Gas comes about when gut bacteria ferment food in the intestinal tract. There are plenty of organisms in the gut, where bacteria may number 100 trillion.
Bacteria perform a variety of valuable services in the large intestine, according to Lin. "But we believe problems may start when bacteria set up shop in the small intestine where they are normally scarce. Usual medical tests such as endoscopy cannot detect this problem in most patients," he said.
However, a breath test can be used to indirectly tell if too many bacteria are in the small intestine. In this test, the patient ingests a syrup containing the sugar lactulose. Over the next three hours, the gaseous products of bacterial fermentation of this sugar may be measured in the exhaled breath.
In a 2003 paper authored by Lin and his research partner Mark Pimentel of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 84 percent of IBS patients were found to have abnormal breath test results suggesting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.
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