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2017-01-25T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Henry Lin?

Dr. Henry C. Lin

Chief of Medicine

University of New Mexico

Direct Phone: (505) ***-**** ext. ****       

Email: h***@***.edu

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University of New Mexico

Background Information

Employment History

University of New Mexico

University of Southern California

American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society

PSM, Chief, Medicine

Department of Veterans Affairs

Chiropractor

Cupertino Wellness Chiropractic

Affiliations

Member
American Gastroenterological Association

Education

MD

bachelor's degree

Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at the City College of New York

Web References (54 Total References)


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ANMS | About Us

www.motilitysociety.org [cached]

Henry Lin


Irritable bowel syndrome

fmscommunity.org [cached]

But according to gastrointestinal motility specialist Henry C. Lin, associate professor of medicine in the Keck School of Medicine of USC, the idea of a bacterial origin of IBS represents a major change in thinking.

Writing in the Aug. 18 issue of JAMA, Lin proposed that ordinary bacteria normally confined to the large intestine may expand into the small intestine, prompting uncomfortable bloating and gas after meals, a change in bowel movements as well as an immune response that may account for the flu-like illness so common in the IBS patient, including such debilitating symptoms as headaches, muscle and joint pains and chronic fatigue.
...
For more than a dozen years, Lin has searched for a common thread to account for the symptoms in IBS. Studies indicate 92 percent of IBS patients report bloating after they eat, a symptom he saw again and again in his patients.
While many physicians believe that IBS-related bloating is perceived and not real, Lin noted that recent studies of IBS patients show that their abdomens do become measurably more distended than those of healthy patients.
With the symptom of post-meal bloating in mind, Lin began the quest for the cause of IBS by considering the problem of increased intestinal gas.
Gas comes about when gut bacteria ferment food in the intestinal tract. There are plenty of organisms in the gut, where bacteria may number 100 trillion.
Bacteria perform a variety of valuable services in the large intestine, according to Lin. "But we believe problems may start when bacteria set up shop in the small intestine where they are normally scarce. Usual medical tests such as endoscopy cannot detect this problem in most patients," he said.
However, a breath test can be used to indirectly tell if too many bacteria are in the small intestine. In this test, the patient ingests a syrup containing the sugar lactulose. Over the next three hours, the gaseous products of bacterial fermentation of this sugar may be measured in the exhaled breath.
In a 2003 paper authored by Lin and his research partner Mark Pimentel of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 84 percent of IBS patients were found to have abnormal breath test results suggesting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.


Othar's Info

www.othar.com [cached]

Hank Lin, USC/UCLA researcher


Dumping Syndrome - aboutGIMotility.org

www.aboutgimotility.org [cached]

Adapted from IFFGD Publication #539 by Carol Rees Parrish, RD, MS, Nutrition Support Specialist, University of Virginia Health System; Henry C. Lin, MD, Chief, Gastroenterology Section, New Mexico VA Health Care System and Professor of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico; and Henry Parkman, MD, Professor of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

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