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This profile was last updated on 12/31/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Mr. Henry Claypool

Wrong Henry Claypool?

Executive Vice President

Local Address: Washington DC, District of Columbia, United States
American Association of People with Disabilities
2013 H Street NW 5Th Floor
Washington Dc , District of Columbia 20006
United States

Company Description: About the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation's largest disability rights...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • bachelor's degree
    University of Colorado
  • degree
184 Total References
Web References
Staff
www.aapd.com, 31 Dec 2014 [cached]
Henry Claypool
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Henry Claypool Executive Vice President
Henry Claypool
www.aapd.com, 31 Dec 2014 [cached]
Henry Claypool
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Henry Claypool
Executive Vice President
Having sustained a spinal cord injury in a snow skiing accident in college, Henry Claypool has been living with a disability for more than thirty years. This experience has fostered a deep personal commitment to ensuring that all Americans with disabilities are able to access the services and supports they need to lead productive and fulfilling lives-and this has been the focus of his professional life. In the period of his life immediately following his injury, Claypool relied on Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Insurance. Support from these programs enabled him to finish college and pursue a career of service to others.
Claypool's career has spanned work providing direct services at the community level to working on federal policy issues in his most recent role in public service as a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. While at HHS, Claypool was a principal architect of the administration's efforts to expanding access to community living services, which culminated in the creation of the Administration for Community Living. Currently, he is the Executive Vice President of the American Association of People with Disabilities. In these roles, he relies on his unique background of public service and personal experience to seek pragmatic policy solutions. For more information, click here.
Latest News
Henry Claypool
Press Releases
www.aapd.com, 17 Sept 2013 [cached]
Statement by Henry Claypool, Executive Vice President of AAPD, on federal Commission on Long-Term Care
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Henry Claypool, Executive Vice President of AAPD, released the following statement in reaction to the final recommendations of the federal Commission on Long-Term Care. Read More >
Person of the Year: Henry ...
www.newmobility.com, 1 Jan 2005 [cached]
Person of the Year: Henry Claypool
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Person of the Year: Henry Claypool
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The man who became the spokesman for ITEM was Henry Claypool. For his bold leadership, statesmanlike style and tenacious advocacy, New Mobility is pleased to honor Henry Claypool as our 2004 Person of the Year.
Henry Claypool
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Henry Claypool, 42, has a passion for freedom and independence, and they are more than mere words. They have tangible roots that go all the way back to Claypool's birthplace, Fort Collins, Colo., at the foot of the Rockies and all that blue sky.
When Henry was just 6 months old, the Claypools left Fort Collins and moved to subsidized housing in the Denver suburbs. "We were poor," says Claypool. "My dad was trying to go to school and working and raising a family. I don't want to make it seem that I'm a product of this hugely difficult time, but I learned how to put the paper products on the bottom of the grocery bag because you can't pay for those with food stamps. We grew up with not a lot, and that shaped me quite a bit. Later, his dad, in pursuit of a Ph.D., moved the family to Mar Vista, Calif., where they lived off-campus in UCLA married students housing-31 units in two big complexes that looked like barracks.
"From the second to the seventh grade I was able to ride my bike from the house to the beach," says Claypool. "As I started to establish my identity, that was how much leash I was given. We were living at Sawtelle and Palms, and I was riding down to Venice Beach. In the early '70s this wasn't the most wholesome place for a young lad to go."
The Claypools returned to the Denver area when Henry was 12. "It was a weird transition," he says. "I came with long hair and I didn't fit in very well in suburban Denver. They don't have hippies there. Later, when Claypool was admitted to the University of Colorado at Boulder, he still had long hair, but he was less of a rebel hippie type than a young man who had learned to play volleyball on the beach and loved to ski.
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Nan Hildebrand, director of CPD at the time, was impressed with how well Claypool managed his attendants.
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"I suggested Henry, and she said, can we hire a client? I said, why not? He had an excellent system and I thought others seeing him do it would help them see how it was done. Claypool, a modest man, downplays his early management skills: "My secret to getting good attendants was getting to know them," he says. "Just talking with them."
Claypool eventually became director of the attendant services program, but Hildebrand got the sense that working in the disability field was just a job for him.
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"I called Henry and said, you've got to come out here!
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Claypool discovered his acumen for analyzing and forming policy while chairing the Colorado Governor's Developmental Disabilities Council from 1993 to 1995. There he helped create the Consortium for Developmental Disabilities Councils, which since has merged with the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities. CDDC is credited with giving developmentally disabled people a stronger voice in the larger organization. This was Claypool's first success at directly influencing national disability policy.
Claypool also worked for the University of Colorado in Boulder. "They needed to comply with the ADA, and I had been trained in it, so the University asked if I would apply for a job. He became coordinator of a program, then eventually moved up to become director of disability services. During that time the campus became much more accessible, disabled students were introduced to potential employers, and Claypool even prevailed upon Ed Roberts-"The Father of the Independent Living Movement"-to speak to the student body.
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"I think of Henry as a guy who can always hold his own, even in a conversation with Ed, and that's what I wanted," says Swenson, who lured Claypool away from Colorado's open spaces to work as her special assistant in Washington, D.C.
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"Henry and I soon became quite an effective team," says Williams.
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That's a heavy responsibility, one that Claypool found frustrating at times. "You're really just an advocate, they say. And so they (the bureaucrats) marginalize you on the inside, and then you get marginalized in the disability community because you're not rootsy enough. Claypool learned to ignore the marginalization, instead focusing on "the times I was stuck working really long days with Bob Williams to get the Olmstead guidance out.
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"Williams and Claypool wrote what they hoped would be guidelines requiring each state to at least provide some Medicaid-funded personal assistance.
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"There was a strong belief in the new administration that giving states broad flexibility in how they deliver services would be a good and valid approach, and I strongly disagreed, and still do today," says Claypool.
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"I can't see the stars here at night," says Claypool. "Wherever you go, people have been here for ages. But in Colorado I could drive for miles, and even though the land had changed hands many times, it felt and looked much like when the Cheyenne and the Arapaho were there. To get back to nature in Washington, D.C., Claypool would get away to the shore in summer and seek out trails to roll on in the winter.
At Advancing Independence, Claypool and Williams got deeply involved with David Jayne and his battle to amend Medicare's homebound restriction [see "David Jayne Unbound," January 2003].
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Claypool was among those invited.
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Claypool, sharp-eared, picked up on the word "occasionally. When Dentzer turned the microphone to Claypool, he said, "I think we're most concerned about the Medicare program telling people with significant disabilities when and under what conditions they can leave their home.
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By this time Claypool and Williams had used Advancing Independence as an organizing tool to form the ITEM coalition, which took the reigns in opposing CMS policy.
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Claypool emerged as the voice of ITEM. "Henry was really the engine point of the coalition," says Cara Bachenheimer, vice president of governmental affairs for Invacare.
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USA Today brought the story to a wider audience: "[Consumer] advocates say that the growth in wheelchair spending is less about fraud and more about a growing number of [people with disabilities] who need assistance. 'There's a tremendous unmet need out there,' says Henry Claypool, co-director of the advocacy group Advancing Independence."
The next day, April 28, Claypool appeared before Sen.
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Claypool began by describing the mission of Advancing Independence and establishing his authority to speak-as a wheelchair user he had been a former Medicare beneficiary. "Developing more effective ways to [curb fraud and abuse] is something that we all support," he said. "Unfortunately, CMS is acting as if the only way it can combat fraud is to severely limit the benefit in ways that undermine the health, independence and dignity of thousands of beneficiaries of all ages."
Claypool deftly exposed CMS' faulty policy-focusing on the restrictive in-home language-using himself as an example: " It was when I [worked] at HCFA that I obtained my power wheelchair using my private coverage.
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Claypool then urged the committee to consider the real issue: "Mr.
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Fighting discrimination is something Claypool does even on vacation, as in his encounter at a cafeteria over Thanksgiving weekend. "I followed the signage into the cafeteria, a busy place, and this employee came up to me and very aggressively said, may I help you, and I said, 'Yeah, I'm just coming up here to go to the cafeteria.'" The man had confronted Claypool because he assumed he was cutting the line. But Claypool was merely following signs that indicated an inaccessible path of travel if he followed the crowd. "I had to make my point-I felt like I was being accosted by an employee. I didn't want to be a big pain in the ass, but I wanted him to understand that I was playing by their rules, I followed their sign and it led me to this point, and I wanted to be treated in a more respectful manner."
Whether testifying before Congress or using a public accommodation, an advocate's job is never done. Henry Claypool thrives on it. "It's about not wanting to be treated badly," he says.
Think Tank: BIOGRAPHIES OF MEETING PARTICIPANTS
www.halftheplanet.com, 18 Dec 2003 [cached]
Henry Claypool
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Henry Claypool
Henry Claypool is Co-Founder of Advancing Independence: Modernizing Medicare and Medicaid (AIMMM), a program of HalfthePlanet Foundation.While with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, he advised the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on the development of guidance to States following the Supreme Court's Olmstead decision and the implementation of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA).While working in State government, he led efforts on the Boulder campus of the University of Colorado to expand programmatic and physical access for students, faculty, staff and visitors after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).Prior to his government service, Mr. Claypool worked at a center for independent living serving people with disabilities in their homes and community.He has personal experience with disability and has been a beneficiary of both the Medicare and Medicaid programs.
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