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This profile was last updated on 9/11/04  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. Hassan Said Yusuf

Wrong Hassan Said Yusuf?
 
Background

Employment History

  • One Journalist
    Somaliland
  • Editor
    Jamhuriya
  • Editor-in-chief of Private Somali-language Daily
    Jamhuriya
  • Editor
    Jamhuuriya
  • Chief Editor
    Jamhuuriya
  • Editor-In-Chief
34 Total References
Web References
Somaliland.Org » Archives
www.somaliland.org, 11 Sept 2004 [cached]
Hassan Saeed Yusuf: One Journalist Who Refuses To Be Silenced Somaliland.Org > Archives
...
Hassan Saeed Yusuf: One Journalist Who Refuses To Be Silenced Rakiya A. Omaar African Rights - Hargeisa, Somaliland - 12 September, 2004
Published in The Republican, Vol.8, Issue 312, 11 September 2004
Hassan Saeed Yusuf: One Journalist Who Refuses to be Silenced
...
I first met Hassan Saeed Yusuf, the editor of Jamhuriya, in Hargeisa central prison in June 1992. Since then, I have visited him there several times, most recently just over a week ago. Jailed by all three presidents of Somaliland, Hassan has been arrested 15 times since 1992. On eight occasions, he has spent time, ranging from five days to a month, in Hargeisa central prison; other times he has been locked up in various police cells. Each time, however, he has been released, for lack of evidence, sometimes aided by international pressure; no court has ever brought a judgement against him.
Hassan's latest brush with the law came just after midnight on 31 August. Policemen came to his office to arrest him in connection with an article he had published that day about the Somali peace talks in Kenya.
...
Imprisoning Hassan will only fuel speculation that it has reason to be secretive on this issue.
On Wednesday 1 September, the day after he was arrested, Hassan was brought to a packed Hargeisa district court. Journalists, members of human rights organizations, of other NGOs and of the Civic Forum of Somaliland, turned out in full force. We listened as a distressed but resolute Hassan refused bail, saying that he had not committed a crime; had not been told the reason for his arrest; and insisted on his right to legal representation. He explained that he had been picked up from his office by CID officers, held overnight and then driven to the dry river bed in the centre of Hargeisa and warned that his throat would be slit if he continued to "harass" the government. According to the charge sheet presented in court, the government accuses Hassan of presenting information that is "unbalanced"(Dheellitir la'aan).
Surprised by the rejection of bail, the judge told Hassan that he would have to send him to prison, a fate he accepted.
...
Buoyed by this show of support, Hassan was in good spirits when we saw him the following day, more or less at home in a prison he has come to know only too well. At 2:30 p.m., shortly after we left, CID officers came with a letter from the district court. He was taken to police headquarters to meet with the head of the police force, Mohamed Igge. According to Hassan, Igge informed him that "the President has released you.
...
Hassan refused to leave prison "until the crime I had committed had been substantiated, adding that I would otherwise bring a case myself against those behind my imprisonment. The argument with the commander continued and, Hassan commented, "I told him that I had been illegally arrested by police officers under his command, and moreover he had now appointed himself the judge.
...
On Saturday, Hassan was told by his lawyer that the CID had met the judge, telling him that Hassan had refused to leave the prison, despite a pardon by the President, and asking for a letter from the court to force him out. But the judge told the CID either to argue their case against him or to bring a letter saying that they no longer had a case against him.
As scheduled, Hassan was brought to court on Sunday the 6th, but the prosecutor did not show up. The hearing was postponed until the 9th, and he was allowed out on bail by his lawyer, allowing him to be at liberty during the visit of the British delegation. Once more, the court room was jammed on the 9th, and a morning was wasted as the prosecution again failed to attend. The judge accepted the suggestion by Hassan's lawyers to summon them in writing, and the next hearing is planned for the 16th.
Though angry to be referred to as "the guilty party" without a shred of evidence, Hassan has drawn consolation and energy from the strong backing and unity shown by a wide spectrum of journalists and civic groups. This break with the past has made him, he said, "want to be a symbol of the determination to fight for justice.
...
Its journalists, including Hassan, have paid a heavy price for our liberty. In standing by him today, we are remembering our past, and consolidating our collective future.
Pambazuka News
www.pambazuka.org, 23 Sept 2004 [cached]
Hassan Saeed Yusuf: One journalist who refuses to be silenced
...
I first met Hassan Saeed Yusuf, the editor of Jamhuriya, in Hargeisa central prison in June 1992.Since then, I have visited him there several times, most recently just over a week ago.Jailed by all three presidents of Somaliland, Hassan has been arrested 15 times since 1992.On eight occasions, he has spent time, ranging from five days to a month, in Hargeisa central prison; other times he has been locked up in various police cells.Each time, however, he has been released, for lack of evidence, sometimes aided by international pressure; no court has ever brought a judgment against him.
Hassan's latest brush with the law came just after midnight on 31 August.Policemen came to his office to arrest him in connection with an article he had published that day about the Somali peace talks in Kenya.
...
Imprisoning Hassan will only fuel speculation that it has reason to be secretive on this issue.
On Wednesday 1 September, the day after he was arrested, Hassan was brought to a packed Hargeisa district court.Journalists, members of human rights organizations, of other NGOs and of the Civic Forum of Somaliland, turned out in full force.We listened as a distressed but resolute Hassan refused bail, saying that he had not committed a crime; had not been told the reason for his arrest; and insisted on his right to legal representation.He explained that he had been picked up from his office by CID officers, held overnight and then driven to the dry river bed in the centre of Hargeisa and warned that his throat would be slit if he continued to "harass" the government.
According to the charge sheet presented in court, the government accuses Hassan of presenting information that is "unbalanced"(Dheellitir la'aan).Surprised by the rejection of bail, the judge told Hassan that he would have to send him to prison, a fate he accepted.
...
Buoyed by this show of support, Hassan was in good spirits when we saw him the following day, more or less at home in a prison he has come to know only too well.At 2:30 p.m., shortly after we left, CID officers came with a letter from the district court.He was taken to police headquarters to meet with the head of the police force, Mohamed Igge.According to Hassan, Igge informed him that "the President has released you."
...
Hassan refused to leave prison "until the crime I had committed had been substantiated, adding that I would otherwise bring a case myself against those behind my imprisonment."
The argument with the commander continued and, Hassan commented, "I told him that I had been illegally arrested by police officers under his command, and moreover he had now appointed himself the judge."
...
On Saturday, Hassan was told by his lawyer that the CID had met the judge, telling him that Hassan had refused to leave the prison, despite a pardon by the President, and asking for a letter from the court to force him out.But the judge told the CID either to argue their case against him or to bring a letter saying that they no longer had a case against him.
As scheduled, Hassan was brought to court on Sunday the 6th, but the prosecutor did not show up.The hearing was postponed until the 9th, and he was allowed out on bail by his lawyer, allowing him to be at liberty during the visit of the British delegation.Once more, the court room was jammed on the 9th, and a morning was wasted as the prosecution again failed to attend.The judge accepted the suggestion by Hassan's lawyers to summon them in writing, and the next hearing is planned for the 16th.
Though angry to be referred to as "the guilty party" without a shred of evidence, Hassan has drawn consolation and energy from the strong backing and unity shown by a wide spectrum of journalists and civic groups.This break with the past has made him, he said, "want to be a symbol of the determination to fight for justice."
...
Its journalists, including Hassan, have paid a heavy price for our liberty.In standing by him today, we are remembering our past, and consolidating our collective future.
Panapress Official Website
www.panapress.com, 4 Oct 2004 [cached]
Mogadishu, Somalia (PANA) - A Magistrate's court in the self-declared Republic of Somaliland Monday acquitted Hassan Said Yusuf, Editor-in-chief of private Somali-language daily, "Jamhuriya," of false publication charges.04/10/2004 full text...
Jamhuuriya editor Hassan Said ...
www.metimes.com, 18 July 2007 [cached]
Jamhuuriya editor Hassan Said Yusuf has been arrested 15 times in the past 10 years.
Somaliland.Org » Archives
www.somaliland.org, 3 Sept 2004 [cached]
In general, the dominating news has been the arrest of Jamhuuriya's Chief Editor, Mr. Hassan Saeed Yusuf, on midnight 31 August. The press reports and the pleas from the various non-governmental organisations seem to agree on one thing: the flimsiness of the government's case against Hassan and the heavy-handedness of the police.
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