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Wrong Harold Liberatore?

Harold Liberatore

Commander

The American Legion

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The American Legion

1615 Poydras St.

New Orleans, Louisiana,70112

United States

Find other employees at this company (8,834)

Background Information

Employment History

Department Commander

American Legion Jersey Boys State Corporation


Web References(16 Total References)


www.chiltonhealth.org

Harold Liberatore with an AED and the police officers who helped save his life: Patrolman Russell Ruggiero, Detective Joseph Zammit, Sgt.
Those who have ever wondered about the benefits of giving to charity may want to ask Harold Liberatore. The 66-year-old man from Milton, NJ recently led a fundraising campaign to purchase three AEDs (automated external defibrillators) for the Lincoln Park Police Department. He knew the medical equipment would provide critical aid to individuals enduring cardiac arrest. He never imagined, however, that it would save his own life. Last year, Liberatore was out shopping for a party, by himself, when he stopped at a traffic light along Main Street in Lincoln Park. That's all he remembers before waking up in Chilton Hospital, though a combination of extraordinary people, technology - and perhaps a little serendipity - enabled him to survive a heart attack and fully recover. Liberatore was found alone in his car, slumped over the steering wheel, by a caring bystander who immediately called for help. Fortunately, an off-duty police officer was driving right behind him and additional responders arrived within minutes, including three more officers from the Lincoln Park Police Department and a volunteer rescue team from Lincoln Park Emergency Medical Services. First on the scene was Patrolman Russell Ruggiero, also an experienced emergency medical technician, with an AED in the trunk of his vehicle. In an amazing twist of fate, the very machine may have been donated by Liberatore himself when he was commander of the American Legion - and was used five times to "shock" his heart before they reached the hospital. "Harold's car was locked, so I yelled for the other officers to break the passenger window, allowing us to put the car in park and pull Harold out of the vehicle," Ruggiero recalled. "He had no pulse and wasn't breathing, so we performed CPR right there on the street and retrieved the AED... which signaled the need for two "shocks" before the ambulance arrived. Without hesitation, Ruggiero hopped in the rig to assist the first aid crew. Together, they continued CPR and electrical therapy all the way to Pompton Plains. "As we approached the hospital, Harold started breathing on his own," stated Ruggiero. Liberatore was successfully revived and soon under the care of Chilton's Emergency Department, where his compelling story continues. Liberatore was promptly evaluated by the Emergency Department team and treated with another technological innovation: therapeutic hypothermia. Following a cardiac catheterization and two days of therapeutic hypothermia, Liberatore awoke fully coherent - eager to jump out of bed and straight toward an American Legion convention. On his doctor's advice, he opted for cardiac rehabilitation instead, enrolling in Chilton's 12-week outpatient program. "I know it happens every day, but you never think a heart attack will happen to you," added Liberatore. "It's a miracle I'm alive."


www.alpost1.org

Harold Liberatore
Post #1 Officers


www.firstaidcorps.org [cached]

66-year-old Harold Liberatore from Milton recently led a fundraising campaign to purchase three AEDs (automated external defibrillators) for the Lincoln Park Police Department.
An AED is a portable device that can diagnose abnormal heart activity and then correct it with electrical therapy. Harold Liberatore the Survivor Liberator knew the medical equipment would provide critical aid to individuals in cardiac arrest. He never imagined, however, that it would save his own life. A few months ago, Liberatore was out shopping by himself for a party when he stopped at a traffic light along Main Street in Lincoln Park. That's the last thing he remembers before waking up in Chilton Hospital. There, a combination of dedicated medical professionals, technology, and perhaps a little serendipity enabled him to survive a heart attack and fully recover. Liberatore was found alone in his car, slumped over the steering wheel, by a bystander who immediately called for help. Fortunately, an off-duty police officer was driving right behind him, and additional responders arrived within minutes, including three more officers from the Lincoln Park Police Department and a volunteer rescue team from Lincoln Park Emergency Medical Services. First on the scene was Patrolman Russell Ruggiero, who is also an experienced emergency medical technician, and he had an AED in the trunk of his vehicle. In an amazing twist of fate, the very same machine may have been donated by Liberatore himself when he was commander of the local American Legion. The AED was used on Liberatore five times to "shock" his heart before he reached the hospital. "Harold's car was locked, so I yelled for the other officers to break the passenger window, allowing us to put the car in park and pull Harold out of the vehicle," Ruggiero recalled. "He had no pulse and wasn't breathing, so we performed CPR right there on the street and retrieved the AED ... which signaled the need for two 'shocks' before the ambulance arrived." Without hesitation, Ruggiero hopped in the rig to assist the first aid crew. Together, they continued CPR and electrical therapy along the way to Chilton Hospital in Pompton Plains. "As we approached the hospital, Harold started breathing on his own," Ruggiero said. Liberatore was successfully revived and soon under the care of Chilton's Emergency Department, where his story continues. Liberatore was promptly evaluated by the Emergency Department team and treated with another technological innovation: therapeutic hypothermia. Following a cardiac catheterization and two days of therapeutic hypothermia, Liberatore awoke fully coherent - eager to jump out of bed and straight toward an American Legion convention. On his doctor's advice, he opted for cardiac rehabilitation instead, enrolling in Chilton's 12-week outpatient program. "I know it happens every day, but you never think a heart attack will happen to you," said Liberatore. "It's a miracle I'm alive."


www.firstaidcorps.org [cached]

66-year-old Harold Liberatore from Milton recently led a fundraising campaign to purchase three AEDs (automated external defibrillators) for the Lincoln Park Police Department.
An AED is a portable device that can diagnose abnormal heart activity and then correct it with electrical therapy. Harold Liberatore the Survivor Liberator knew the medical equipment would provide critical aid to individuals in cardiac arrest. He never imagined, however, that it would save his own life. A few months ago, Liberatore was out shopping by himself for a party when he stopped at a traffic light along Main Street in Lincoln Park. That's the last thing he remembers before waking up in Chilton Hospital. There, a combination of dedicated medical professionals, technology, and perhaps a little serendipity enabled him to survive a heart attack and fully recover. Liberatore was found alone in his car, slumped over the steering wheel, by a bystander who immediately called for help. Fortunately, an off-duty police officer was driving right behind him, and additional responders arrived within minutes, including three more officers from the Lincoln Park Police Department and a volunteer rescue team from Lincoln Park Emergency Medical Services. First on the scene was Patrolman Russell Ruggiero, who is also an experienced emergency medical technician, and he had an AED in the trunk of his vehicle. In an amazing twist of fate, the very same machine may have been donated by Liberatore himself when he was commander of the local American Legion. The AED was used on Liberatore five times to "shock" his heart before he reached the hospital. "Harold's car was locked, so I yelled for the other officers to break the passenger window, allowing us to put the car in park and pull Harold out of the vehicle," Ruggiero recalled. "He had no pulse and wasn't breathing, so we performed CPR right there on the street and retrieved the AED ... which signaled the need for two 'shocks' before the ambulance arrived." Without hesitation, Ruggiero hopped in the rig to assist the first aid crew. Together, they continued CPR and electrical therapy along the way to Chilton Hospital in Pompton Plains. "As we approached the hospital, Harold started breathing on his own," Ruggiero said. Liberatore was successfully revived and soon under the care of Chilton's Emergency Department, where his story continues. Liberatore was promptly evaluated by the Emergency Department team and treated with another technological innovation: therapeutic hypothermia. Following a cardiac catheterization and two days of therapeutic hypothermia, Liberatore awoke fully coherent - eager to jump out of bed and straight toward an American Legion convention. On his doctor's advice, he opted for cardiac rehabilitation instead, enrolling in Chilton's 12-week outpatient program. "I know it happens every day, but you never think a heart attack will happen to you," said Liberatore. "It's a miracle I'm alive."


www.njamericanlegion.org [cached]

Commander for 2011-2012 - Harold Liberatore
135 W. Hanover Street, Trenton 08618 The following appointments were made by Commander Liberatore and were duly confirmed by the Department Executive Committee at a meeting held in Wildwood, NJ on June 10, 2011.


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