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This profile was last updated on 7/17/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Harley Y. Tse

Wrong Dr. Harley Y. Tse?

Professor of Immunology and Micro...

Wayne State University's school of medicine
Phone: (313) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: h***@***.edu
Wayne State University
4717 St. Antoine
Detroit, Michigan 48201
United States

Company Description: Wayne State University is one of the nation's pre-eminent public research universities in an urban setting, ranking in the top 50 in R & D expenditures of all...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Research Fellow
    Merch Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories

Education

  • Ph.D.
11 Total References
Web References
The vaccine could also target strokes ...
www.dailypioneer.com, 17 July 2014 [cached]
The vaccine could also target strokes which are a product of plaque buildup in arteries," said Harley Tse, a professor of immunology and microbiology in Wayne State University's school of medicine.
...
Shaw and Tse demonstrated that two T cell epitopes of the autoantigen "apoB100" are deeply involved in the development of the disease. Although T-cells of the immune system are known to participate in the development of heart disease, by what and how these T-cells are directed to act has not been elucidated. "With the discovery of the disease-causing T-cell epitopes, we can now manipulate the activities of the T-cells responding to these epitopes to control the disease," Shaw said. Shaw and Tse conceptualised that finding the "apoB100" epitopes capable of stimulating the disease causing (atherogenic) T-cells is a prerequisite to understand how these T-cells are involved in heart disease development and how to control their adverse effects. They identified two short sequences of "apoB100" that were able to direct specific T-cells to proliferate as well as to cause worsening atherosclerosis. "This discovery is significant because it identifies the target T-cells and makes it possible to manipulate this population of pathologic T-cells away from their harmful activities," Shaw and Tse said. The novel discovery is reported in the Journal of Immunology and Clinical Research.
Harley Tse, Ph.D., associate ...
health.blogdig.net, 25 Feb 2011 [cached]
Harley Tse, Ph.D., associate professor of immunology and microbiology at WSU's School of Medicine and resident of West Bloomfield, Mich., whose study was published in the January 2011 edition of the Journal of Neuroimmunology,found that targeting white blood cells of the immune system known as T cells is the effective approach to block the disease in an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
...
"Scientists have been trying to understand how and why the relapse cycles occur and to design therapy to delay disease relapses and hence prolong the remission period," said Tse.
Scientists came up with two conflicting conjectures. Some found that the T cells involved in each relapse were different and were directed against different myelin proteins. As such, these T cells are not suitable targets for therapy. Others, however, could not find support for this in their studies. "It was important to resolve this issue because the two models suggested totally different therapeutic approaches," Tse said.
The vaccine could also target strokes ...
www.deccanherald.com, 17 July 2014 [cached]
The vaccine could also target strokes which are a product of plaque buildup in arteries," said Harley Tse, a professor of immunology and microbiology in Wayne State University's school of medicine.
...
Shaw and Tse demonstrated that two T cell epitopes of the autoantigen "apoB100" are deeply involved in the development of the disease.
Although T-cells of the immune system are known to participate in the development of heart disease, by what and how these T-cells are directed to act has not been elucidated.
"With the discovery of the disease-causing T-cell epitopes, we can now manipulate the activities of the T-cells responding to these epitopes to control the disease," Shaw said.
Shaw and Tse conceptualised that finding the "apoB100" epitopes capable of stimulating the disease causing (atherogenic) T-cells is a prerequisite to understand how these T-cells are involved in heart disease development and how to control their adverse effects.
They identified two short sequences of "apoB100" that were able to direct specific T-cells to proliferate as well as to cause worsening atherosclerosis.
"This discovery is significant because it identifies the target T-cells and makes it possible to manipulate this population of pathologic T-cells away from their harmful activities," Shaw and Tse said.
The published work, performed in the ...
www.eurekalert.org, 16 July 2014 [cached]
The published work, performed in the laboratory of Klaus Ley, M.D., a prominent vascular biologist of LIAI, was based on the fundamental discovery made by Harley Tse, Ph.D., professor of immunology and microbiology in Wayne State's School of Medicine, and professor in Wayne State's Cardiovascular Research Institute, and Michael Shaw, Ph.D., adjunct assistant professor of immunology and microbiology at Wayne State.
...
Shaw and Tse are the first to demonstrate that two T cell epitopes of the autoantigen apoB100 are deeply involved in the development of the disease.
...
"ApoB100 is an apolipoprotein of the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) particle which is the notorious 'bad cholesterol' that contributes to the formation of plaques in the vessel wall," said Tse. "Although T cells of the immune system are known to participate in the development of heart disease, by what and how these T cells are directed to act have not been elucidated. The lack of this knowledge has greatly hampered the development of immune peptide-based therapeutics to control the disease. With the discovery of the disease-causing T cell epitopes, we can now manipulate the activities of the T cells responding to these epitopes to control the disease."
Since immune T cells are normally activated by a short sequence (called an epitope), and not by the whole molecule of an antigen, Shaw and Tse conceptualized that finding the apoB100 epitopes capable of stimulating the disease causing (atherogenic) T cells is a prerequisite for understanding how these T cells are involved in heart disease development and for finding ways to control their adverse effects.
...
Substantial funding for Dr. Tse's research was provided by the Office of the Vice President for Research at Wayne State University.
Ley collaborated with fellow La Jolla ...
www.news-line.com, 17 June 2014 [cached]
Ley collaborated with fellow La Jolla Institute scientist Alessandro Sette, PhD and Dr. Tse of Wayne State University in Michigan, to identify the specific peptides, which prompt the arterial attack in mice - the byproduct of which is inflammation.
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