Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 4/19/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Hari Jones?

Hari Jones

Founding Director

Center for Creative Photography

HQ Phone:  (845) 679-9957

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Center for Creative Photography

59 Tinker Street

Woodstock, New York,12498

United States

Company Description

The Center for Photography at Woodstock is a leading not-for-profit organization dedicated to supporting artists working in photography and related media and engaging audiences through opportunities in which creation, discovery, and learning are made possible....more

Background Information

Employment History

Next Artist

Joseph Bellows Gallery


Curator

African American Civil War Museum


Founding Director

U.A.S Corporation


Founding Director

CCP


Affiliations

National Civil War Museum

Board Member


Mary Virginia Swanson

Professor Emeritus and Volunteer Coordinator of the Voices of Photography Oral History Project


LIGHT Gallery

Founder


Distinguished Alumni Lecture Series

Founder


Education

Civil War Preservation Trust Teacher Institute


University of Oklahoma


BFA

Painting and Photography

Maryland Institute


MFA

University of New Mexico


Web References(194 Total References)


Joseph Bellows Gallery - Harold Jones - Biography

www.josephbellows.com [cached]

Harold Jones
Harold Jones | American, 1940 - Harold Jones (born 1940) has contributed to photography as an artist, educator, curator and arts administrator. Born in Morristown, New Jersey in 1940, he graduated from the Maryland Institute with a BFA in Painting and Photography, and from the University of New Mexico with an MFA in Art History and Photography. In 1975 Jones became the founding director of the Center for Creative Photography and then went on to start the photography program at the University of Arizona where he taught for the next 30 years. Presently he is professor emeritus and volunteer coordinator of the Voices of Photography oral history project at the Center. Jones continues to be a constant student and practitioner of photography. Harold Jones's photography is difficult to categorize, and there are no generalizations that satisfactorily describe his varied body of work. His original training in painting and photography led to a practice that Jones referred to as "photodrawings" - gelatin silver prints worked with a variety of hand-colored surfaces. Over the years, Jones used ink, food coloring, and oil paints as well as a variety of chemical toners to produce effects that range from subtle to direct. The resulting images are unique and cannot be duplicated. Initially he was ambivalent about altering the surfaces of his prints, feeling that it was an impure practice, but ultimately concluded that creating the photograph was the first phase of drawing, and surface treatments and coloring constituted the second phase. Jones' approach has varied even within his unaltered prints. He has worked with both multiple and long-duration exposures to capture motion.


Photocritic International » »Photocritic International

www.nearbycafe.com [cached]

The first time I visited Rochester, in 1971, in my role as an emerging photography critic and participant in a George Eastman House winter symposium,[8] Harold Jones, founding director of the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona, then an assistant curator at the GEH, had the assignment of squiring me around the place.
Then Harold guided me back into the great entrance hall (known there as "the conservatory"), to stand in front of the massive Aeolian pipe organ ― an unusual feature in such a mansion, to say the least, so large that its pipes disappeared into the high ceiling. "Eastman loved his mother very much, you know," Harold reminded me. "She lived here with him, and he mourned her fiercely when she died. "This had been his mother's bedroom," Harold said, smiling.


Rick Wester Fine Art - News - The Private Collection of Fern M. Schad

www.rickwesterfineart.com [cached]

In keeping with its artist-centric mission, LIGHT was nurtured early on by the photographer and historian Harold Jones, the gallery's first director and also a co-founder.
After Jones left in 1975, he contributed to the birth of the Center for Creative Photography as its founding director (1975-1977). Jones was followed by another photographer-as-director, the young Victor Schrager.


Center for Creative Photography | Mary Virginia Swanson | On Making and Marketing Art

mvswanson.com [cached]

January 20th, Tucson: Lecture by Harold Jones "Every Picture Tells a Story"
Center for Creative Photography Lecture by Harold Jones: Every Picture Tells a Story Friday, January 20, 2012 at 5:30 pm CCP Auditorium. Free and open to the public. "Humans have been communicating through images for hundreds of thousands of years; more recently using photography. Harold Jones is presenting this lecture on the anniversary of the birth date of Hippolyte Bayard (January 20, 1801 - May 14, 1887), whom he celebrates as the first creative photographer. The lecture will include Jones's view of what photography is, where it came from, and where it might go. The presentation will be part history of photography, part cultural commentary; part personal history, and part audience participation. In 1975 Jones became the founding Director of the Center for Creative Photography, and then went on to start the Photography Program at the University of Arizona where he taught for the next 30 years. Presently he is Professor Emeritus and volunteer coordinator of the Voices of Photography oral history project at the Center. Jones continues to be a constant student and practitioner of photography." Posted January 10th, 2012 | Category: Approaching Event, MVS Marketing Blog | Tags: Arizona, artist talk, CCP, Center for Creative Photography, Harold Jones, lecture, Mary Virginia Swanson, MVS, photography, Tucson |


www.tucsonweekly.com

Longtime teacher/curator Harold Jones finally shows off his own photography work
Harold Jones: A Fortunate Life ArtsEye Gallery 3550 E. Grant Road Back in 1979, when Harold Jones' twins were small girls, one of them dropped her bike in the dirt. It was a typical Tucson day with a blinding sun, and the bars of the bike cast deep shadows in the sand. The wheels glowed in the brilliant light and spun round so fast that the spokes turned into a blur. Jones grabbed his camera and made "Wheel," an elegant composition of a circle and lines, vividly etched in black and white. Another time, the girls must have been squirting water from a hose into the dry backyard. The long hose curled sinuously across the square concrete pavers, a deep shadow trailing alongside the rubber. The clear water, almost invisible in the light, splashed down to the earth, and a ring of water and mud exploded into the air. Jones captured the action in "Water Experiment. "At the heart of my discovery was the eloquence of animated light," Jones writes in a wall text. "Making light dance in the print was a far more interesting challenge to me than whatever the subject matter may have been." Jones, now approaching 70, is celebrating a lifetime of photography with A Fortunate Life, a retrospective at ArtsEye, the midtown gallery that doubles as a photo lab. Jones has lived in Tucson since 1975, but I can't remember seeing a show of his own work before. He worked both ends of the camera during his career, always doing his own art, but he was better known to the public as a curator, administrator and teacher. His career certainly lives up to the good fortune of the show's title. Right out of grad school at the University of New Mexico, he landed the plum post of assistant curator at the George Eastman House, the photo mecca in Rochester, N.Y., home of Kodak. From there, he was invited to become director of LIGHT, the first contemporary photography gallery in New York City, and next, the UA recruited him to be the founding director of the Center for Creative Photography. Three years later, he switched to teaching, and he gets credit for founding the university's photography program. He taught until 2005, logging 30 years in the classroom and darkroom. Jones adds surface interest to the rigorous composition by drawing wavy lines in white ink all across the black-and-white silver print. Even more interesting, he managed to position his camera so that he could reproduce the city's skyscrapers, reflected in two windows midway up the warehouse façade. The tiny reflected towers make for an ingenious photo within the photo. Jones trained as a painter long ago, and as a student, he worked at a portrait studio, where, in the days before Photoshop, he often retouched color images. In quite a few of his works at ArtsEye, he carries on that multimedia mentality, doctoring his black-and-white photos with food coloring, paint and ink. The rest of the picture remains black and white, but Jones highlights the work's optical tricks by delicately hand-coloring the reflections in the mirrors. Jones does go so far as to make a portrait of his wife. Shot in 1972, "Frances, New York City" has Murray gazing at her husband, a towel wrapped around her wet hair.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory