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Hanne Aagaard

Hamish Holewa

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bilingualdesigns.com

Exploring these difficulties spoke, Dr. Hanne Aagaard with Hamish Holewa about their study of mothers with premature babies in neo - natal units, leaves will best be supported and guided in order to secure control over their baby's care.


bilingualdesigns.com

Exploring these difficulties spoke, Dr. Hanne Aagaard with Hamish Holewa about their study of mothers with premature babies in neo - natal units, leaves will best be supported and guided in order to secure control over their baby's care.


www.ipp-shr.cqu.edu.au [cached]

Dr Hanne Aagaard
Dr Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Department of Science in Nursing, University of Aarhus, Denmark Exploring these difficulties, Dr Hanne Aagaard spoke with Hamish Holewa about her study on how mothers, with preterm infants in neo-natal units, can best be supported and guided to confidently take control of their baby's care. Psycho-social factors related to the neo-natal unit including, the lack of privacy , unfamiliarity with surroundings, feelings of incompetence in caring for the infant, and guilt and distress in relation to the infants health impinged on the mothers' ability to care for their child. Health professionals in neo-natal units need to minimise separation between mother and child, provide support and guidance in caring for the infant, and provide information in a non-authoritarian, supportive manner. Transcript Hamish Holewa: Hi and welcome to IPP-SHR podcasts, I'm Hamish Holewa and for this Friday's podcast I'm speaking with Doctor Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow in the Institute of Public Health, Department of Nursing Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark. I'm speaking with Hanne about her article and study titled: Mothers' experiences of having a preterm infant in neonatal care unit: A meta-synthesis; co-authored with others listed on our website and published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing. n your article you note that neo-natal nurses are challenged with multiple tasks of providing best possible development care for the baby, but also helping the mother through this uncertain motherhood. Do you want to share with our listeners the challenges with being a mother with a preterm neo-natal newborn? Hanne Aagaard: We found it quite overwhelming to be a mother to a preterm infant because they are unprepared. Hanne Aagaard: The second part is all her worries related to being a mother connected to the child. She suddenly has experience of change in her body, because the birth had been unexpected. She's suddenly responsible for the infant; she is not making her mind clear, as mothers do normally when they go through the whole pregnancy. She feels embarrassed, guilty maybe, distressed; she has a lot of emotional ups and downs, primarily connected to how the infant behaves and the medical health status of the infant. She feels incompetent as a mother, even if she has an elder child. Later on, when she gets on the other side of this unfamiliar situation and she increases in her care competency, she gets more energy to look at the care and the treatment as a process. Hamish Holewa: And your review does actually centre on those topics, those reciprocal relationships and you have five metaphors for them, including, the mother-baby relationship, the maternal development, the turbulent neo-natal care environment, role claiming strategies and the mother-nurse relationship. Do you want to further explain the maternal care-giving role claiming strategies in respect to a mother's care giving in the NICU environment? Hanne Aagaard: It was exciting, to make this metaphor, because it was, in fact, the first time that we could describe this double situation the mother is in, she's in fact, she fights a fight: she fights the fight for the baby, she fights the fight for herself and to find a meaningful maternal role, in fact, and she is still dependent on the hospital because still the infant is dependent on what the treatment and the care can offer. When she is increasing her motherhood, she's starting to express wishes and feelings concerning how she wants it and how she especially not wants it, the care, and the agreements with the nurses. And at that moment she runs a risk, because when she takes over, she takes the power, or some of it, and it can label her as a difficult and troublesome mother, and having that label, it makes her into a vulnerable position, together with the infant. I will not focus on fear, but so many things are happening at the same time and is disturbing the nursing, disturbing the mother, disturbing the doctors. So she is going to be the main person to have the overview of her child's process. She has to be very clear about how many complex competences, who is in play when we have to make this process. And at last, she will also be very engaged to retrain the maternal role. She is desperate to get all the information from the professionals about the infants health, she's very eager to increase the process to take the responsibility of the child, and I think if she is that, then we have fulfilled our goals because that what is the meaning, it's to make her mature to take over her responsibility. Hamish Holewa: And what are the practice implications then from this research? Hanne Aagaard: We would like very much to focus on the timing. There is processes, especially in the beginning where it is very important that the nurses are attentive to when is the right moment to put the mother and infant together. It's very important to minimise the separation between the mother and infant. It's very very important that the mother is as much as possible at the intensive care unit, so she can be together with the child. And that said, it's very important that the nurses are giving all the information in the right way; it must not be too complicated, it's a balance. Every mother is different or individual, so she has to analyse how to tell her and when to tell her. And then it's their duty to push the mother into the care to help her, because a lot of the mothers feel that they are the second mother. And then the way to increase the maternal competency is to make written recommendations so the mother has the time to look at the written recommendations, so she can think it over. And then we think a guided participation: it's very important that the nurses don't leave the mother on the island alone. It's very important that the mother feels safe; she feels that she can get the support she needs. The nurse is, of course, the main guider in the beginning, and then she just steps backwards and becomes more more inactive and just guides the mother by words or questions. The third one, and that's a very funny one, we think, chatting, that's very important to the mother, that she feels more like a partner to the nurse. They are not equal, but she is a partner. One way the nurse can appraise her, the mother's competence, is chatting about other things just like how to care and when are you going feed and all those things. It builds up her feeling that she is important here and the nurses appreciate her, and that's very important. Hamish Holewa: And just to assist - Well that's a very strong practice implication from your study, and particularly on this important work. Well, thank you Hanne for sharing your insights today on IPP-SHR podcasts. Hanne Aagaard: You're welcome.


www.ipp-shr.cqu.edu.au [cached]

Dr Hanne Aagaard
Dr Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Department of Science in Nursing, University of Aarhus, Denmark Exploring these difficulties, Dr Hanne Aagaard spoke with Hamish Holewa about her study on how mothers, with preterm infants in neo-natal units, can best be supported and guided to confidently take control of their baby's care. Psycho-social factors related to the neo-natal unit including, the lack of privacy , unfamiliarity with surroundings, feelings of incompetence in caring for the infant, and guilt and distress in relation to the infants health impinged on the mothers' ability to care for their child. Health professionals in neo-natal units need to minimise separation between mother and child, provide support and guidance in caring for the infant, and provide information in a non-authoritarian, supportive manner. Transcript Hamish Holewa: Hi and welcome to IPP-SHR podcasts, I'm Hamish Holewa and for this Friday's podcast I'm speaking with Doctor Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow in the Institute of Public Health, Department of Nursing Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark. I'm speaking with Hanne about her article and study titled: Mothers' experiences of having a preterm infant in neonatal care unit: A meta-synthesis; co-authored with others listed on our website and published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing. n your article you note that neo-natal nurses are challenged with multiple tasks of providing best possible development care for the baby, but also helping the mother through this uncertain motherhood. Do you want to share with our listeners the challenges with being a mother with a preterm neo-natal newborn? Hanne Aagaard: We found it quite overwhelming to be a mother to a preterm infant because they are unprepared. Hanne Aagaard: The second part is all her worries related to being a mother connected to the child. She suddenly has experience of change in her body, because the birth had been unexpected. She's suddenly responsible for the infant; she is not making her mind clear, as mothers do normally when they go through the whole pregnancy. She feels embarrassed, guilty maybe, distressed; she has a lot of emotional ups and downs, primarily connected to how the infant behaves and the medical health status of the infant. She feels incompetent as a mother, even if she has an elder child. Later on, when she gets on the other side of this unfamiliar situation and she increases in her care competency, she gets more energy to look at the care and the treatment as a process. Hamish Holewa: And your review does actually centre on those topics, those reciprocal relationships and you have five metaphors for them, including, the mother-baby relationship, the maternal development, the turbulent neo-natal care environment, role claiming strategies and the mother-nurse relationship. Do you want to further explain the maternal care-giving role claiming strategies in respect to a mother's care giving in the NICU environment? Hanne Aagaard: It was exciting, to make this metaphor, because it was, in fact, the first time that we could describe this double situation the mother is in, she's in fact, she fights a fight: she fights the fight for the baby, she fights the fight for herself and to find a meaningful maternal role, in fact, and she is still dependent on the hospital because still the infant is dependent on what the treatment and the care can offer. When she is increasing her motherhood, she's starting to express wishes and feelings concerning how she wants it and how she especially not wants it, the care, and the agreements with the nurses. And at that moment she runs a risk, because when she takes over, she takes the power, or some of it, and it can label her as a difficult and troublesome mother, and having that label, it makes her into a vulnerable position, together with the infant. I will not focus on fear, but so many things are happening at the same time and is disturbing the nursing, disturbing the mother, disturbing the doctors. So she is going to be the main person to have the overview of her child's process. She has to be very clear about how many complex competences, who is in play when we have to make this process. And at last, she will also be very engaged to retrain the maternal role. She is desperate to get all the information from the professionals about the infants health, she's very eager to increase the process to take the responsibility of the child, and I think if she is that, then we have fulfilled our goals because that what is the meaning, it's to make her mature to take over her responsibility. Hamish Holewa: And what are the practice implications then from this research? Hanne Aagaard: We would like very much to focus on the timing. There is processes, especially in the beginning where it is very important that the nurses are attentive to when is the right moment to put the mother and infant together. It's very important to minimise the separation between the mother and infant. It's very very important that the mother is as much as possible at the intensive care unit, so she can be together with the child. And that said, it's very important that the nurses are giving all the information in the right way; it must not be too complicated, it's a balance. Every mother is different or individual, so she has to analyse how to tell her and when to tell her. And then it's their duty to push the mother into the care to help her, because a lot of the mothers feel that they are the second mother. And then the way to increase the maternal competency is to make written recommendations so the mother has the time to look at the written recommendations, so she can think it over. And then we think a guided participation: it's very important that the nurses don't leave the mother on the island alone. It's very important that the mother feels safe; she feels that she can get the support she needs. The nurse is, of course, the main guider in the beginning, and then she just steps backwards and becomes more more inactive and just guides the mother by words or questions. The third one, and that's a very funny one, we think, chatting, that's very important to the mother, that she feels more like a partner to the nurse. They are not equal, but she is a partner. One way the nurse can appraise her, the mother's competence, is chatting about other things just like how to care and when are you going feed and all those things. It builds up her feeling that she is important here and the nurses appreciate her, and that's very important. Hamish Holewa: And just to assist - Well that's a very strong practice implication from your study, and particularly on this important work. Well, thank you Hanne for sharing your insights today on IPP-SHR podcasts. Hanne Aagaard: You're welcome.


www.ipp-shr.cqu.edu.au [cached]

Dr Hanne Aagaard
Dr Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow, Institute of Public Health, Department of Science in Nursing, University of Aarhus, Denmark Exploring these difficulties, Dr Hanne Aagaard spoke with Hamish Holewa about her study on how mothers, with preterm infants in neo-natal units, can best be supported and guided to confidently take control of their baby's care. Psycho-social factors related to the neo-natal unit including, the lack of privacy , unfamiliarity with surroundings, feelings of incompetence in caring for the infant, and guilt and distress in relation to the infants health impinged on the mothers' ability to care for their child. Health professionals in neo-natal units need to minimise separation between mother and child, provide support and guidance in caring for the infant, and provide information in a non-authoritarian, supportive manner. Transcript Hamish Holewa: Hi and welcome to IPP-SHR podcasts, I'm Hamish Holewa and for this Friday's podcast I'm speaking with Doctor Hanne Aagaard, Doctorate Fellow in the Institute of Public Health, Department of Nursing Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark. I'm speaking with Hanne about her article and study titled: Mothers' experiences of having a preterm infant in neonatal care unit: A meta-synthesis; co-authored with others listed on our website and published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing. n your article you note that neo-natal nurses are challenged with multiple tasks of providing best possible development care for the baby, but also helping the mother through this uncertain motherhood. Do you want to share with our listeners the challenges with being a mother with a preterm neo-natal newborn? Hanne Aagaard: We found it quite overwhelming to be a mother to a preterm infant because they are unprepared. Hanne Aagaard: The second part is all her worries related to being a mother connected to the child. She suddenly has experience of change in her body, because the birth had been unexpected. She's suddenly responsible for the infant; she is not making her mind clear, as mothers do normally when they go through the whole pregnancy. She feels embarrassed, guilty maybe, distressed; she has a lot of emotional ups and downs, primarily connected to how the infant behaves and the medical health status of the infant. She feels incompetent as a mother, even if she has an elder child. Later on, when she gets on the other side of this unfamiliar situation and she increases in her care competency, she gets more energy to look at the care and the treatment as a process. Hamish Holewa: And your review does actually centre on those topics, those reciprocal relationships and you have five metaphors for them, including, the mother-baby relationship, the maternal development, the turbulent neo-natal care environment, role claiming strategies and the mother-nurse relationship. Do you want to further explain the maternal care-giving role claiming strategies in respect to a mother's care giving in the NICU environment? Hanne Aagaard: It was exciting, to make this metaphor, because it was, in fact, the first time that we could describe this double situation the mother is in, she's in fact, she fights a fight: she fights the fight for the baby, she fights the fight for herself and to find a meaningful maternal role, in fact, and she is still dependent on the hospital because still the infant is dependent on what the treatment and the care can offer. When she is increasing her motherhood, she's starting to express wishes and feelings concerning how she wants it and how she especially not wants it, the care, and the agreements with the nurses. And at that moment she runs a risk, because when she takes over, she takes the power, or some of it, and it can label her as a difficult and troublesome mother, and having that label, it makes her into a vulnerable position, together with the infant. I will not focus on fear, but so many things are happening at the same time and is disturbing the nursing, disturbing the mother, disturbing the doctors. So she is going to be the main person to have the overview of her child's process. She has to be very clear about how many complex competences, who is in play when we have to make this process. And at last, she will also be very engaged to retrain the maternal role. She is desperate to get all the information from the professionals about the infants health, she's very eager to increase the process to take the responsibility of the child, and I think if she is that, then we have fulfilled our goals because that what is the meaning, it's to make her mature to take over her responsibility. Hamish Holewa: And what are the practice implications then from this research? Hanne Aagaard: We would like very much to focus on the timing. There is processes, especially in the beginning where it is very important that the nurses are attentive to when is the right moment to put the mother and infant together. It's very important to minimise the separation between the mother and infant. It's very very important that the mother is as much as possible at the intensive care unit, so she can be together with the child. And that said, it's very important that the nurses are giving all the information in the right way; it must not be too complicated, it's a balance. Every mother is different or individual, so she has to analyse how to tell her and when to tell her. And then it's their duty to push the mother into the care to help her, because a lot of the mothers feel that they are the second mother. And then the way to increase the maternal competency is to make written recommendations so the mother has the time to look at the written recommendations, so she can think it over. And then we think a guided participation: it's very important that the nurses don't leave the mother on the island alone. It's very important that the mother feels safe; she feels that she can get the support she needs. The nurse is, of course, the main guider in the beginning, and then she just steps backwards and becomes more more inactive and just guides the mother by words or questions. The third one, and that's a very funny one, we think, chatting, that's very important to the mother, that she feels more like a partner to the nurse. They are not equal, but she is a partner. One way the nurse can appraise her, the mother's competence, is chatting about other things just like how to care and when are you going feed and all those things. It builds up her feeling that she is important here and the nurses appreciate her, and that's very important. Hamish Holewa: And just to assist - Well that's a very strong practice implication from your study, and particularly on this important work. Well, thank you Hanne for sharing your insights today on IPP-SHR podcasts. Hanne Aagaard: You're welcome.


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