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This profile was last updated on 12/17/06  and contains information from public web pages.

Hamza Khan Shinwari

Wrong Hamza Khan Shinwari?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Poet
    Pashto Academy
  • Perfect Artist
    Ghazal
  • President
    Bazm-e-Adab
  • Vice President
    Bazm-e-Adab
  • Vice President and General Secretary
    Olasi Adabi Jirga

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Ghazal
  • General Secretary
    Bazm-e-Adab

Education

  • degree
13 Total References
Web References
Global Peace
www.global-peace.net, 17 Dec 2006 [cached]
The death anniversary of great Pashto poet Hamza Shinwari is being observed on July 17.
...
Apart from Bach Jan, its founding fathers were Syed Rahat Zakheli as its president, Hamza Shinwari as its vice-president and Bad Shah Gul Niazi as its general secretary.After some time, the presidentship was entrusted to Hamza Shinwari to look after its affairs right upto 1950 when it was merged in a larger society called Olasi Adabi Jirga (National Literary Council).
...
It was in 1940 at one such Mushaira that Hamza was given the title of "The King Of Ghazal" now commonly referred to as "Baba-e-Ghazal", when he recited the poem of which I shall give here two couplets.Translation:I am again invited by the RaqibIt may only be a trap for revenge.Your dark eyes are bent on my heartThe Moors are again poised for storming the Kaaba. (Hamza)For a number of years this society worked for the revival of Pashto letters.Its scope expanded with the passage of time.A time came when a larger and more representative society was visualized to accommodate poets and writers from the entire province.It was in 1950 that the Bazm-e-Adab was finally merged into the Olasi Adabi Jirga.The moving spirit behind this August Jirga was Sanobar Hussain Kakaji with Hamza Shinwari and Dost Mohammad Kamil as its vice-president and general secretary.
...
Hamza was also the first major poet to have consciously created and carefully sustained a pervading literary consciousness throughout the Khyber.He raised a fresh crop of young, talented poets who were soon to yield a rich literary harvest ready for export to Afghanistan and the rest of the Pashto speaking world.
...
Here I shall compare Hamza Shinwari with each of these classical luminaries of medieval Pashto literature:
...
Who could light a candle on my grave? (Hamza)
...
In the preface to Hamza Shinwari's book, Ghazawoon (Yawning), Qalandar Momand maintains, "The poetry of all the contemporary Ghazal writers; their expression, construction, style, imagery and even their diction have all been influenced by the Ghazal of Hamza.So, if the poetry of Hamza is to be discussed, it will necessitate the discussion of all the contemporary poets which is a difficult task".Similarly, comparing Hamza to a light-house for the coming generations, Noor Mohammad Zigar has written, "It is a law of nature that every age is provided with such personalities as can determine the standard and keep the wheel of evolution turning.
...
Apart from his own time such a person can be like a light-house for the coming ages", Hamza has also been compared to a large tree with its roots deep down in the classical tradition, its trunk a source of strength for the present age while its tender, high boughs and the fruit therein is a symbol of hope and nourishment for the posterity.As compared to poetry, Pashto prose is rather poor.Many of our great writers, of course with a few fortunate exceptions, have paid this equally vital branch of literature; they have hardly ever wandered from the evergreen pastures of poetry.But on the contrary Hamza has written more prose than poetry, with great diversity and equally great depth.Starting with stories and essays he soon stepped into mysticism from where he took the highway to philosophy.Even in his last days he was writing a book on "Free will and Predetermination" or Jabar wa Ikhtiaar.He has also written a novel.Two volumes of travelogues, a biography and an autobiography.In the beginning he used to write stories or short stories and essays which used to be published in various magazines including the prestigious Nan Paroon (nowadays) which used to be published from Delhi during the Second World War.Later on they were collected and published in a miscellany called Jawar Fikroona (deep thoughts).In 1937 he published his first major work on mysticism under the title Tajjaliate Mohammadia (the refulgence of Mohammad).It can truly be called a compendium on Sophism.In 1957 he published the accounts of his tour of Afghanistan.In 1958 he published a novel called Nawe Chape (new waves).
...
When the radio station was opened in Peshawar in 1935, along with Abdul Karim Mazloom and Samandar Khan Samandar, Hamza Shinwari was one of its pioneers in dramatics.
...
Hamza had played the role of the judge in that play.Soon he wrote his first play, Zamindar (the farmer) for the radio.This was followed by hundreds of plays and features over a life-long association with the radio.According to Farooq Shinwari, Hamza has written 200 plays for the radio.
...
Saifur Rehman Syed has dug up some 60 names of the plays of Hamza Shinwari, from the old diaries of the radio.
Hamza has also his ...
www.afghanwiki.com [cached]
Hamza has also his share in the decoration of Pashto, The coming generations will ever be conscious of this (Hamza Shinwari)
The death anniversary of great Pashto poet Hamza Shinwari is being observed on July 17.
...
Apart from Bach Jan, its founding fathers were Syed Rahat Zakheli as its president, Hamza Shinwari as its vice-president and Badshah Gul Niazi as its general secretary. After some time, the president-ship was entrusted to Hamza Shinwari to look after its affairs right up to 1950 when it was merged in a larger society called Olasi Adabi Jirga (National Literary Council).
...
It was in 1940 at one such Mushaira that Hamza was given the title of "The King Of Ghazal" now commonly referred to as "Baba-e-Ghazal", when he recited the poem of which I shall give here two couplets.
Translation: I am again invited by the Raqib It may only be a trap for revenge. Your dark eyes are bent on my heart The Moors are again poised for storming the Kaaba. (Hamza)
...
The moving spirit behind this August Jirga was Sanobar Hussain Kakaji with Hamza Shinwari and Dost Mohammad Kamil as its vice-president and general secretary.
...
Hamza was also the first major poet to have consciously created and carefully sustained a pervading literary consciousness throughout the Khyber. He raised a fresh crop of young, talented poets who were soon to yield a rich literary harvest ready for export to Afghanistan and the rest of the Pashto speaking world.
...
Here I shall compare Hamza Shinwari with each of these classical luminaries of medieval Pashto literature:
...
In the preface to Hamza Shinwari's book, Ghazawoone (Yawning), Qalandar Momand maintains, "The poetry of all the contemporary Ghazal writers; their expression, construction, style, imagery and even their diction have all been influenced by the Ghazal of Hamza. So, if the poetry of Hamza is to be discussed, it will necessitate the discussion of all the contemporary poets which is a difficult task".
Similarly, comparing Hamza to a light-house for the coming generations, Noor Mohammad Zigar has written, "It is a law of nature that every age is provided with such personalities as can determine the standard and keep the wheel of evolution turning.
...
Apart from his own time such a person can be like a light-house for the coming ages", Hamza has also been compared to a large tree with its roots deep down in the classical tradition, its trunk a source of strength for the present age while its tender, high boughs and the fruit therein is a symbol of hope and nourishment for the posterity. As compared to poetry, Pashto prose is rather poor. Many of our great writers, of course with a few fortunate exceptions, have paid this equally vital branch of literature; they have hardly ever wandered from the evergreen pastures of poetry. But on the contrary Hamza has written more prose than poetry, with great diversity and equally great depth. Starting with stories and essays he soon stepped into mysticism from where he took the highway to philosophy. Even in his last days he was writing a book on "Free will and Predetermination" or Jabar wa Ikhtiaar. He has also written a novel. Two volumes of travelogues, a biography and an autobiography. In the beginning he used to write stories or short stories and essays which used to be published in various magazines including the prestigious Nan Paroon (nowadays) which used to be published from Delhi during the Second World War. Later on they were collected and published in a miscellany called Zhawar Fikroona (deep thoughts). In 1937 he published his first major work on mysticism under the title Tajalliate Mohammadia (the refulgence of Mohammad). It can truly be called a compendium on Sophism. In 1957 he published the accounts of his tour of Afghanistan. In 1958 he published a novel called Nawe Chape (new waves).
Hamza Baba - Baba e Ghazal
www.khyber.org, 16 Sept 2005 [cached]
Hamza Shinwari is invariably called "The father of Pashto Ghazal". In this all his critics are unanimous. It is not because he is the exponent of the Ghazal form in Pashto litrature. The Ghazal is as old, in fact older than Pashto literature itself. It is because he has given it new dimensions and a new sense of perfection; which was somehow lacking in the entire Pashto Ghazal before him. As it might have been pointed out before, the Ghazal form as such came to Pashto via Persian.
...
Murad Ali Shinwari, Hamaz Shinwari's only son and a poet and writer in his own right, writes about Hamza Shinwari, "The poetic intuition of Hamza Shinwari and his inborn inclination towards Ghazal, could not tolerate that the scope ofGhazal should be so constricted that it could not express his national or patriotic feelings through it.
...
For a brief outline of the Pashto Ghazal and the place of Hamza Shinwari in it we should turn to Professor Yar Mohammad Maghmoom. He not only teaches Pashto literture but is also an admirer (if not a student as well as a disciple) of Hamza Shinwasri. He, however, explains, "The Roshanite Movement (of Bayazid Ansari) gave birth to a poet like Mirza Khan Ansari, who adopted Ghazal for his poetic effusions; and when this unbroken chain reached Kazim Khan Shaida, the Ghazal had somewhat come of age. Shaida undertook new experiments in Ghazal, which became the basis of its maturity. But Shaida undertook new experiments in Ghazal, which became the basis of its maturity. But with the Ghazal of Hamza Shinwari this maturity attains perfection.
...
If the characteristics of both the above poets could be combined in the Ghazal of one poet then it is Hamza and Hamza alone. It cannot duly define the Ghazal of Hamza if I call it Pakhtoon Ghazal because even the mysticism of our poet is Pakhtoon.
Pointing out the distinguishing characteristics of the Ghazal of Hamza, Noor Mohammad Zigar points out, "Hamza Baba has given to Ghazal new words and terms (and he has listed a number of them which we might as well overlook).
...
In this connection Tahir Kulachvi writes about Hamza Shinwari.
...
"It will not be out of place (here) if I call Hamza the Ghalib or Khwaja Hafiz of Pashto literature. He expresses even love and passion in artfully philosophical way. Perhaps that is the reason that his poetry is somehow above the common run; only the cultivated (or the initiated_) can appreciate it fully. It would be more proper to call him the poet of a particular taste. In the same, vein Dr. Raj Wali Shah Khattak maintains, "The art of Hamza is his poetry and particularly Ghazal in poetry. How far he has succeeded in the art of Ghazal can be judged from the fact that he is called the father of Ghazal. As the father of Ghazal he has taken Ghazal to perfection.
...
The credit of the perfection of the Pashto Ghazal goes to Hamza. So, Hamza is the perfect artist of Ghazal. His Ghazal carries all the requirements of Pashto Ghazal; rather he can be said to have created "The Pashto Ghazal" in Pashto.
This doesn't at all mean that Hamza has been influenced by either Urdu or Persian or both and that he has consciously or unconsciously tried to imitate their great poets to achieve a similar greatness for himself in Pashto. On the contrary he has been influenced by none. He has but limited study of both Urdu and Persian, although he has written books in Urdu and has also done extensive Urdu-Pashto translations. / Only among the Pashto poets he has been inspired, to a certain degree, by Khushal Khan Khattak and Kazim Khan Shaida which he himself admits. Yet even their influence on him is minimum, indeed invisible. He might, in the same way, have read all the great Urdu poets but has never been visibly influenced by an Urdu or Persian poet. Farigh Bokhari has pointed out this fact by saying; "A glaringly noteworthy characteristic of Hamza Shinwari is that he has been least influenced by Urdu or Persian poetry because of his very limited study thereof". It may well be an inborn greatness, attained by the compulsions of his own elemental genius, unadulterated by the undercurrents or crosscurrents of alien poetry or poetic traditions. It would not be out of place here to discuss them controversial issue of "art for art's sake" and "art for life", in the context of Hamza Shinwari's poetry. By coming across some of his new poems, some of his critics have mistakenly concluded that Hamza has also fallen a prey to the lure of art for art's sake. He is, therefore, branded as an idealist, a utopian or at best an escapist. I think it is a very wrong and self-deluding assumption. It is at best a rude irony because of all the Pashto poets Hamza is the least escapist; indeed if he abhors anything it is the inherent absurdity in the theory of art for art's sake. Once I turned his attention to this question and in his usual curt manner he replied indignantly, "If art is for art's sake then where does man come in.
...
Hamza has translasted two of Iqbal's works in Pashto verse.
...
"There was no purpose or object in Ghazal before Hamza; whether it was Persian Ghazal or Urdu Ghazal, its axis was beauty and its untiring praise from various angles, a mere gratification of the aesthetic impulse. Hamza did not adopt a contrary course from the main stream Ghazal and its inherent spirit but he did insert Pakhtoon elements into it".
...
Hamza felt that as long as it was not given a direction or a transfusion of an aim or object there could be no question of a healthy literature in Pashto. When he looked at Ghazal with the eye of an artist, he soon came to know that as long as the spirit of Pakhtoon was not infused with its spirit, it could not be called a Pashto Ghazal of Hamza."
It is interesting to see how Abdur Rahim Majzoob has compared Hamza Shinwasri with Khushal Khan, Rehman Baba and Ali Khan and has pointed out their certain shortcomings which he claims to have been rectified by Hamza. He writes, "In the Ghazal of Khushal Khan there is amorous pleasure, cheerfulness and romance; but his Ghazal sounds incomplete, imperfect and artificial.
...
On the contrary, the love and beauty that have been extolled in the Ghazal of Hamza Shinwari are pure and divine.
...
But this lack of mysticism on the part of Ali Khan was more than made up by Hamza.
...
It was Ghazal which bestowed upon Hamza this coveted title of Baba-e-Ghazal but only because it was Hamza who established Ghazal in Pashto literature so firmly that it sounds on more alien, a mere borrowed entity, encumbered with a host of artificial conventions. It now more than seems a part and parcel of pathan psyche, reflecting his own surroundings and his own inner urges in a forthright, faithful manner. He gave it such a perfect finish and such a glittering glass that it can now be said to have become the envy of both Urdu and Persian Ghazal. In this process he also happened to erase a recurrent inferiority complex from the mind of subsequent Pathan poets.
...
Whatever Hamza has done for Pashto Ghazal from technicasl point of view can not be denied by even a confirmed Hamza denier. He has more than proved that Pashto has vaster ground for Ghazal than all those languages which alone have been boasting about good Ghazal so far. Of course he means Urdu and Persian.
At the end, we will quote this highly amusing criticism of Hamza and the Ghazal form by Abdur Rahim Majzoob. He writes, "It was perhaps Hamza who stretched his old muscles in the beginning of the twentieth century.
...
Hamza is old; he is not to blame.
Amir Hamza Shinwari
www.khyber.org, 16 Sept 2005 [cached]
Hamza has also his share in the decoration of Pashto, The coming generations will ever be conscious of this (Hamza Shinwari)
The death anniversary of great Pashto poet Hamza Shinwari is observed on July 17 every year.
...
Apart from Bach Jan, its founding fathers were Syed Rahat Zakheli as its president, Hamza Shinwari as its vice-president and Bad Shah Gul Niazi as its general secretary. After some time, the presidentship was entrusted to Hamza Shinwari to look after its affairs right upto 1950 when it was merged in a larger society called Olasi Adabi Jirga (National Literary Council).
...
It was in 1940 at one such Mushaira that Hamza was given the title of "The King Of Ghazal" now commonly referred to as "Baba-e-Ghazal", when he recited the poem of which I shall give here two couplets.
...
The moving spirit behind this August Jirga was Sanobar Hussain Kakaji with Hamza Shinwari and Dost Mohammad Kamil as its vice-president and general secretary.
...
Hamza was also the first major poet to have consciously created and carefully sustained a pervading literary consciousness throughout the Khyber. He raised a fresh crop of young, talented poets who were soon to yield a rich literary harvest ready for export to Afghanistan and the rest of the Pashto speaking world.
...
Here I shall compare Hamza Shinwari with each of these classical luminaries of medieval Pashto literature:
...
In the preface to Hamza Shinwari's book, Ghazawoon (Yawning), Qalandar Momand maintains, "The poetry of all the contemporary Ghazal writers; their expression, construction, style, imagery and even their diction have all been influenced by the Ghazal of Hamza. So, if the poetry of Hamza is to be discussed, it will necessitate the discussion of all the contemporary poets which is a difficult task".
Similarly, comparing Hamza to a light-house for the coming generations, Noor Mohammad Zigar has written, "It is a law of nature that every age is provided with such personalities as can determine the standard and keep the wheel of evolution turning.
...
Apart from his own time such a person can be like a light-house for the coming ages", Hamza has also been compared to a large tree with its roots deep down in the classical tradition, its trunk a source of strength for the present age while its tender, high boughs and the fruit therein is a symbol of hope and nourishment for the posterity.
As compared to poetry, Pashto prose is rather poor. Many of our great writers, of course with a few fortunate exceptions, have paid this equally vital branch of literature; they have hardly ever wandered from the evergreen pastures of poetry. But on the contrary Hamza has written more prose than poetry, with great diversity and equally great depth. Starting with stories and essays he soon stepped into mysticism from where he took the highway to philosophy. Even in his last days he was writing a book on "Free will and Predetermination" or Jabar wa Ikhtiaar. He has also written a novel. Two volumes of travelogues, a biography and an autobiography. In the beginning he used to write stories or short stories and essays which used to be published in various magazines including the prestigious Nan Paroon (nowadays) which used to be published from Delhi during the Second World War. Later on they were collected and published in a miscellany called Jawar Fikroona (deep thoughts). In 1937 he published his first major work on mysticism under the title Tajjaliate Mohammadia (the refulgence of Mohammad). It can truly be called a compendium on Sophism. In 1957 he published the accounts of his tour of Afghanistan. In 1958 he published a novel called Nawe Chape (new waves).
...
When the radio station was opened in Peshawar in 1935, along with Abdul Karim Mazloom and Samandar Khan Samandar, Hamza Shinwari was one of its pioneers in dramatics.
...
Hamza had played the role of the judge in that play. Soon he wrote his first play, Zamindar (the farmer) for the radio. This was followed by hundreds of plays and features over a life-long association with the radio. According to Farooq Shinwari, Hamza has written 200 plays for the radio.
...
Saifur Rehman Syed has dug up some 60 names of the plays of Hamza Shinwari, from the old diaries of the radio.
Afghanan Dot Net
www.afghanan.net, 23 Mar 2006 [cached]
Hamza has also his share in the decoration of Pashto, The coming generations will ever be conscious of this (Hamza Shinwari)
The death anniversary of great Pashto poet Hamza Shinwari is being observed on July 17.
...
Apart from Bach Jan, its founding fathers were Syed Rahat Zakheli as its president, Hamza Shinwari as its vice-president and Bad Shah Gul Niazi as its general secretary. After some time, the presidentship was entrusted to Hamza Shinwari to look after its affairs right upto 1950 when it was merged in a larger society called Olasi Adabi Jirga (National Literary Council).
...
It was in 1940 at one such Mushaira that Hamza was given the title of "The King Of Ghazal" now commonly referred to as "Baba-e-Ghazal", when he recited the poem of which I shall give here two couplets.
Translation: I am again invited by the Raqib It may only be a trap for revenge. Your dark eyes are bent on my heart The Moors are again poised for storming the Kaaba. (Hamza)
...
The moving spirit behind this August Jirga was Sanobar Hussain Kakaji with Hamza Shinwari and Dost Mohammad Kamil as its vice-president and general secretary.
...
Hamza was also the first major poet to have consciously created and carefully sustained a pervading literary consciousness throughout the Khyber. He raised a fresh crop of young, talented poets who were soon to yield a rich literary harvest ready for export to Afghanistan and the rest of the Pashto speaking world.
...
Here I shall compare Hamza Shinwari with each of these classical luminaries of medieval Pashto literature:
...
In the preface to Hamza Shinwari's book, Ghazawoon (Yawning), Qalandar Momand maintains, "The poetry of all the contemporary Ghazal writers; their expression, construction, style, imagery and even their diction have all been influenced by the Ghazal of Hamza. So, if the poetry of Hamza is to be discussed, it will necessitate the discussion of all the contemporary poets which is a difficult task".
Similarly, comparing Hamza to a light-house for the coming generations, Noor Mohammad Zigar has written, "It is a law of nature that every age is provided with such personalities as can determine the standard and keep the wheel of evolution turning.
...
Apart from his own time such a person can be like a light-house for the coming ages", Hamza has also been compared to a large tree with its roots deep down in the classical tradition, its trunk a source of strength for the present age while its tender, high boughs and the fruit therein is a symbol of hope and nourishment for the posterity. As compared to poetry, Pashto prose is rather poor. Many of our great writers, of course with a few fortunate exceptions, have paid this equally vital branch of literature; they have hardly ever wandered from the evergreen pastures of poetry. But on the contrary Hamza has written more prose than poetry, with great diversity and equally great depth. Starting with stories and essays he soon stepped into mysticism from where he took the highway to philosophy. Even in his last days he was writing a book on "Free will and Predetermination" or Jabar wa Ikhtiaar. He has also written a novel. Two volumes of travelogues, a biography and an autobiography. In the beginning he used to write stories or short stories and essays which used to be published in various magazines including the prestigious Nan Paroon (nowadays) which used to be published from Delhi during the Second World War. Later on they were collected and published in a miscellany called Jawar Fikroona (deep thoughts). In 1937 he published his first major work on mysticism under the title Tajjaliate Mohammadia (the refulgence of Mohammad). It can truly be called a compendium on Sophism. In 1957 he published the accounts of his tour of Afghanistan. In 1958 he published a novel called Nawe Chape (new waves).
...
When the radio station was opened in Peshawar in 1935, along with Abdul Karim Mazloom and Samandar Khan Samandar, Hamza Shinwari was one of its pioneers in dramatics.
...
Hamza had played the role of the judge in that play. Soon he wrote his first play, Zamindar (the farmer) for the radio. This was followed by hundreds of plays and features over a life-long association with the radio. According to Farooq Shinwari, Hamza has written 200 plays for the radio.
...
Saifur Rehman Syed has dug up some 60 names of the plays of Hamza Shinwari, from the old diaries of the radio.
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